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Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary

DigiTrad:
BARBAREE
HIGH BARBAREE


Related threads:
Tune Req: High Barbary (The Three Bums - Kent) (13)
Folklore: How Barbary Pirates Learned Their Trade (44)
Lyr Req: Lily of Barbary (Pete Scrowther) (4)


Nigel Parsons 19 Feb 11 - 08:58 PM
GUEST,Tim 19 Feb 11 - 09:40 PM
GUEST 19 Feb 11 - 09:44 PM
MGM·Lion 19 Feb 11 - 11:39 PM
GUEST,Richie 06 Jan 14 - 12:46 PM
Don Firth 06 Jan 14 - 02:03 PM
Richie 06 Jan 14 - 02:16 PM
Steve Gardham 06 Jan 14 - 02:56 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Jan 14 - 04:46 PM
Richie 06 Jan 14 - 05:25 PM
Richie 06 Jan 14 - 05:32 PM
Lighter 06 Jan 14 - 06:56 PM
Steve Gardham 07 Jan 14 - 11:38 AM
Steve Gardham 07 Jan 14 - 11:42 AM
GUEST 07 Jan 14 - 11:55 AM
Steve Gardham 07 Jan 14 - 02:18 PM
Richie 07 Jan 14 - 02:53 PM
Richie 07 Jan 14 - 03:07 PM
GUEST,MCP 07 Jan 14 - 03:22 PM
Richie 07 Jan 14 - 03:43 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Jan 14 - 04:25 PM
Richie 07 Jan 14 - 05:10 PM
Steve Gardham 07 Jan 14 - 05:34 PM
Lighter 07 Jan 14 - 07:53 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Jan 14 - 12:52 PM
Steve Gardham 08 Jan 14 - 03:44 PM
Steve Gardham 08 Jan 14 - 03:52 PM
Lighter 08 Jan 14 - 04:33 PM
GUEST 23 Aug 14 - 08:34 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 19 Feb 11 - 08:58 PM

THE COASTS OF BARBARY.

There were two ships from England set sails,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
The King of Prussia and the Prince of Wales,
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary.

There's naught ahead, sirs, nothing astern,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
But a lofty vessel to windward would turn,
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary.

Then hail her, the captain call'd o'er the side,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
Be you a privateer, then he cried,
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary?

I am a privateer, sirs, to-day,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
A saucy privateer, sirs, after prey,
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary.

Then broadsides on the gallant vessels go,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
Away her mainmast did we English blow.
Cruising: down the coasts of Barbary

For mercy then how the rascals cried,
Blow high ! Blow low! And so sailed we.
The mercy shown was to sink them in the tide,
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary.

With cutlass and gun, they fought hours three,
Blow high ! Blow low! And so sailed we.
The ship their coffin, their grave the sea.
Cruising down the coasts of Barbary.

NP

Having searched for this by both title, and distinctive line. This version appears not to be in the DT
This version is from:
"English Folk-Songs for Schools" (Curwen Edition 6051)
collected and arranged by S Baring Gould, M.A. and Cecil J. Sharp, B.A.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: GUEST,Tim
Date: 19 Feb 11 - 09:40 PM

ALso knpwm as Wild Barbary/Barbaree


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Subject: ADD versions: High Barbary
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Feb 11 - 09:44 PM

http://books.google.com/books?id=YIIeEY3voUkC&pg=PR22&dq=There+were+two+ships+from+England+set+sails,+Blow+high!+Blow+low!+And+s

http://books.google.com/books?id=PimT8EQd5dkC&pg=PA17&dq=There+were+two+ships+from+England+set+sails,+Blow+high!+Blow+low!+And+s

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/High_Barbary.htm


HIGH BARBARY

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

2. "Aloft there, aloft there"
Our jolly bosun cried
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
"Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an' a-lee"
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

3. "There's naught upon the stern, sir
There's naught upon our lee
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
But there's a lofty ship to wind'ard
An' she's sailin' fast and free"
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

4. "Oh hail her, oh hail her"
Our gallant captain cried
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
"Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?" cried he
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

5. "Oh, I'm not a man-o-war
Nor privateer," said he
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
"But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee"
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

6. For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
'Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate's mast away
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

7. "Oh quarter, oh quarter"
Those pirates they did cry
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank 'em in the sea
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary



2 more

http://www.yarmcentral.ednet.ns.ca/sailing_ships/shanties/high_barbaree.htm


HIGH BARBARY

call: There were two lofty ships from old England set sail;
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: One was the Prince of Luther and the other Prince of Wales.
reply: All a-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: "Aloft, there, aloft," our bully bos'n cried.
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: "Look ahead and look astern and look a-windward and a-lee."
reply: A-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: "Well, there's naught upon the stern, boys, there's naught upon the lee."
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: "But there's a lofty ship a-windward and she's sailin' fast and free."
reply: A-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: "Oh, hail her, oh, hail her!" our gallant captain cried.
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: "Are you a man-of-war or a privateer?" cried he.
reply: All a-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: "No, I am not a man-of-war or privateer." cried he.
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: "But I'm a saltsy pirate and I'm lookin' for my fee."
reply: All a-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: For broadside, for broadside they lay all on the main;
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: Until the Prince of Luther blew the pirate's mast away.
reply: All a-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.

call: "Oh, quarter, oh, quarter!" those salty pirates cried;
reply: Blow high, blow low, and so sail we.
call: But the quarter that we gave them was to sink them in the sea.
reply: All a-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree, High Barbaree.
          A-cruisin' down the coast of the High Barbaree.


http://www.shf.org.au/JCraig/Chanty.html




HIGH BARBARY
Traditional

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin' down the coast
Of High Barbary

"Aloft there, aloft there"
Our jolly bosun cried
"Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an' a-lee"

"There's naught upon the stern, sir
There's naught upon our lee
But there's a lofty ship to wind'ard
An' she's sailin' fast and free"

"Oh hail her, oh hail her"
Our gallant captain cried
"Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?" cried he

"Oh, I'm not a man-o-war
Nor privateer," said he
"But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee"

For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
'Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate's mast away

"Oh quarter, oh quarter"
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank 'em in the sea


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 19 Feb 11 - 11:39 PM

In DT as High Barbaree ~~ the version I have always known, to a tune similar to the second one given there.

♫~Michael~♬♩


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: GUEST,Richie
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 12:46 PM

Several researchers including Shay and Coffin attribute "The Coast of Barbary" ("High Barbaree") to Charles Didbin, however I can find no ballad by Didbin that it is based on.

Anyone know the name of Didbin's ballad?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Don Firth
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 02:03 PM

I sing the same version that's in DT, give or take a note or two. I learned it from Walt Robertson back about 1953 or so. I subsequently found it in "The Burl Ives Songbook" (paperback).

Perhaps one of the first examples of what, during WW II was known as a "Q ship" (never did find out what the "Q" stands for).

Barbary pirates were wreaking all kinds of havoc on the shipping of all countries. They would block merchant ships, then if they offered no resistance, loot them, then let them go on their way. Sort of an early protection racket. If the merchant ship resisted, the usual battle took place in which the merchant ship usually lost.

Fed up, the English navy sent out two ships fixed up to look like merchant ships, but were actually men o'war. They were "trolling" for pirates. If approached by a pirate, they would seem to cooperate, then when they sailed in alongside, sucker-punch them with a broadside.

During the Second World War, before the United States got into it, they were shipping stuff to England on the "Lend-Lease" program. German U-boats would attack any merchant ships heading for England, but would avoid destroyers or sub-chasers. When the U-boat came in close, assuming it was easy pickings, the "merchant ship's"—Q ship's—guns and/or depth charge launchers would suddenly go into action and blow the U-boat out of the water.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 02:16 PM

I put the US broadside from the 1700s on my site entitled "Coast of Barbary." http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/us--canada-versions-285-the-high-barbaree.aspx

I wonder what the date is? It's from The Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society: 1639-1800. Barry in 1929 says that's it's a very old broadside.

TY Don for that info,

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 02:56 PM

The date of the actual event is 1594, but the earliest version I have a copy of is dated 1655-58. There will be other printings though. The extended volume of Rollins would probably have the date of its first registration, although it's not in my abridged version.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 04:46 PM

Blow High, Blow Low was credited to Charles Dibdin by W. S. Braiithwaite, 1909, "Book of Georgian Verse.," This has been copied by many including Bartleby.

"Blow high, blow low, let the tempest steer The mainmast by the board....
In hopes once more to be on shore Safe moored with thee."

The Bodleian credits the above to Charles Dibdin; others say "traditional, revised by C. Dibdin.
I cannot find it in the Admiralty edition of "Songs by Charles Dibdin, 1875, with poems also by T. Dibdin and C. Dibdin Jr.

Steve, what are the lyrics of the 1665-version?
Did the ships Prince of Luther and Prince of Wales appear in a version before the 1890s??


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 05:25 PM

Steve- Just wondering about info regarding the date, Chappell (Roxburghe) has 1590 for the first part and 1994 for the second part.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 05:32 PM

typo--second dates is 1594


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Lighter
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 06:56 PM

In his 1836 autobiography, the Rev. Thomas F. Dibdin, credits the "1909" song to his uncle Charles, saying it was the elder Dibdin's "first sea-song."

It was in print anonymously but complete with melody as early as 1788 in "The New Vocal Enchantress."

Except for the phrase in question, Dibdin's song has nothing to do with the Child ballad.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 11:38 AM

Q
Price of Luther & POW appear on a Deeming, Boston, Mass. broadside of about 1840. On the earlier Swindells and Batchelor broadsides c1820 they have King of Prussia and POW.

Of course these are not names in the 16-17th century versions.

Richie,
Chappell is somewhat confusing. He keeps referring to 'the second part' and there are several second parts. When he refers to 'the second part' in his introductory note I think he means the whole traditional ballad which of course itself has 2 parts. There was apparently another first part partially given in the play 'The Noble Kinsmen'. This would imply that the ballad as it was registered in 1594 was the one reprinted in the 1650s, and the one registered in 1590 was the first part not included in the later printings and having a different format without the refrains.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 11:42 AM

Q
You can see a copy of 'The Saylor's Onely Delight' at Bodleian Rawlinson (183). If you can't decipher the black letter it's also in Child. ESPB 285


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 11:55 AM

The text in The Two Noble Kinsmen can be seen here: Two Noble Kinsmen - The George Alow:

Enter Gaoler's Daughter, and sings.

  The George alow came from the south,
  From the coast of Barbary-a;
  And there he met with brave gallants of war,
  By one, by two, by three a.
  Well hail'd, well hail'd, you jolly gallants!
  And whither now are you bound-a?
  O, let me have your company
  Till I come to the Sound-a!
  There was three fools fell out about an howlet;
  The one said it was an owl
  The other he said nay,
  The third he said it was a hawk,
  And her bells were cut away.


Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 02:18 PM

Mick
Those last five lines are from a separate song still sung today, 'Three Jolly Welshmen'. In the 17thc it was called 'Choice of Inventions'.

What is the date of TNK?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 02:53 PM

The English source according to Hugill and Harlow is apparently "broadside in Patterson's Anthology," which I assume is the "Salcombe Seaman." There are copies of it- seems to be fairly recent. Any info?

A Mr. Bullen says the name of the ship is: "George a' Looe" Any chance than this is the correct ship.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 03:07 PM

A broadside by Yeats dated 1910 was published in Dublin, the same text was published earlier by Masefield in 1906:

Masefield Sailor's Garland 1906

THE SALCOMBE SEAMAN'S FLAUNT TO
THE PROUD PIRATE

A Lofty ship from Salcombe came,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
She had golden trucks that shone like flame,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"Masthead, masthead," the captains hail,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"Look out and round; d' ye see a sail?"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"There's a ship what looms like Beachy Head,"
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"Her banner aloft it blows out red,"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"Oh, ship ahoy, and where do you steer?"
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"Are you man-of-war, or privateer?"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"I am neither one of the two," said she,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"I'm a pirate, looking for my fee,"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"I'm a jolly pirate, out for gold :"
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"I will rummage through your after hold,"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

The grumbling guns they flashed and roared,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
Till the pirate's masts went overboard,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

They fired shot till the pirate's deck,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
Was blood and spars and broken wreck,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

"O do not haul the red flag down,"
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
"O keep all fast until we drown,"
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

They called for cans of wine, and drank,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
They sang their songs until she sank,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

Now let us brew good cans of flip,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
And drink a bowl to the Salcombe ship,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

And drink a bowl to the lad of fame,
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we;
Who put the pirate ship to shame,
On the bonny coasts of Barbary.

Sharp's version is from 1914 but he does not give an English antecedent- only the quote by Mick above- referencing the George Aloe.

Rcihie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: GUEST,MCP
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 03:22 PM

Steve

According to wiki article TNK was entered in Stationers Register in 1634, but references to it in other sources suggest it may have been written and performed as early as 1613-1614.

I saw the two songs in the quote, but that's how it appears in the copy - run together. This later (1897) edition separates the stanzas and also has the first line as The George, holla!, came from the South! : The Two Noble Kinsmen - 1897 ed

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 03:43 PM

Steve, Leonard Deming only printed at that address in Boston from 1831-1836 so c.1840 is not accurate. (Deming broadside at LOC)

Do you have a copy or text of the "J. Swindells" broadside circa 1820s?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 04:25 PM

Lyr. Add: COAST OF BARBARY
Deming (Boston) broadside, c. 1831-1836

Two lofty ships from Old England came,
Blow high and blow low and so sailed we;
One was the Prince of Luther and the other Prince of Wales,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary

Up aloft, up aloft, the jolly boatswain cries,
Blow high and blow low, and so sailed we;
Look ahead, look astern, look the weather and the lee,
Look along down on the Coast of Barbary.

There's none upon the stern, there's none upon the lee,
Blow high and blow low, and so sailed we;
But there is a ship at windward, a lofty ship at sea,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary.

Oh hail, Oh hail, that lofty tall ship,
Blow high and blow low and so sailed we;
Are you a man of war or privateer, said she,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary.

Oh, I am no man of war, or privateer, said she,
Blow high and blow low, and so sailed we;
But I am a jolly Pirate, a looking for my fee,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary.

Broadside and broadside, a long time they lay,
Blow high and blow low and so sailed we;
Till the Prince of Luther shot all the Pirate's masts away,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary.

Oh quarters! Oh quarters! these Pirates did cry;
Blow high and blow low, and so sailed we;
But the quarters that we gave them, we sunk them in the sea,
Cruising down on the Coast of Barbary.

Similar to the version posted by Guest.
Copied from the broadside at American Memory.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Richie
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 05:10 PM

The British Coast of Barbary broadside referenced by Steve are in the Madden collection

Coast of Barbary.
Batchelor, T., 14 Hackney Road, Crescent.
First line: There were two ships from England.
    Reel: 06, Frame 4389

Coast of Barbary.
Swindells, Manchester.
First line: It was in the summer time, all in the.
    Reel: 09, Frame 6147

Anyone have access- or a link to broadsides?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 05:34 PM

Richie,
I thought c1840 off the top of my head was pretty good for 1831-36 but there you go. That little c. means approximately. It's not meant to be accurate.

Yes, I have a copy of the Swindells text. It's from the Madden Collection as is the Batchelor copy. I'll scan it and email tomorrow.

I agree with you re Salcomb song. It is rather too poetic to have come from tradition and is very likely from Masefield's pen. I certainly can't find any earlier copies.

Yeats was also noted for rewriting ballads from tradition.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Jan 14 - 07:53 PM

Steve, could you scan one for me too?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Jan 14 - 12:52 PM

It would be nice to have it posted here at mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 08 Jan 14 - 03:44 PM

Okay
They're actually quite different now I hold them both together.

Swindells, Manchester

Coast of Barbary

It was in the summer time, all in the month of May,
Blow high and blow low, and so sail'd we;
I saw the King of Prussia, likewise the Prince of Wales
Cruizing down all on the coast of Barbary

Up aloft, up aloft, our jolly captain cries, &c.
I saw a ship to windward, and a lofty sail to lee, &c.

O hail her, O hail her, our jolly captain cries,
Are you some man of war, or some privateer, said he

I am no man of war, nor privateer, said he,
But I am that jolly pirate that's seeking for my prey,

If you are that jolly pirate, seeking for your prey,
Come you English lads point your guns and show them British play,

Then broadside to broadside these two vessels did lay,
Till this British man of war shot this pirate's mast away,

For quarter, for quarter, this pirate he did pray,
All the quarter we afford them we sunk them in the sea

So now to their end came these jolly pirates brave,
The ship it was their coffin, and the sea it was their grave,

(Almost as poor as Masefield's offering! Too many jollys and braves.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 08 Jan 14 - 03:52 PM

I much prefer this offering of T Batchelar, Hackney Road Crescent, London

Coast of Barbary

There were two ships from England set sail,
Blow high, blow low, and so sail'd we,
One was the King of Prussia, & the other Prince of Wales,
Cruising down the coast of Barbary.

There was nothing a-head, and nothing a-stern,
But a lofty ship to windward and toward us bearing way,

Then hail her, oh, hail her, our noble captain cried;
Are you a man of war, or a privateer? said he,

I am no man of war, or a privateer, said he;
But I am that saucy pirate that is seeking for my prey,

O then broadside to broadside these two ships did go,
Till at last the saucy English the pirates mast did blow,

For mercy, for mercy, the daring rascals cried;
But the mercy that we show'd them was to sink them in the tide,

For better than two hours this battle lasted as you see,
The ship was their coffin, and their grave was the sea,


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: Lighter
Date: 08 Jan 14 - 04:33 PM

Thanks, Steve. In this case, I might accept the view that the broadside (Swindell's) came almost straight from a traditional singer.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Coasts of Barbary
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Aug 14 - 08:34 AM

Coming in late here, but a version of this song is to be found on SBG manuscript exL1x taken down from a tramp in North Devon (UK) in 6/8 time and changed by SBG to 4/4 time in 1894 - probably the earliest collected version of the 'George Allo(w) and the Sweepstake' story registered as a ballad in 1595? See Full English website of the EFDSS.


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