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print guitar chord thingies on music

leeneia 13 Apr 11 - 10:51 AM
theleveller 13 Apr 11 - 11:03 AM
Bounty Hound 13 Apr 11 - 11:04 AM
Stringsinger 13 Apr 11 - 11:30 AM
leeneia 13 Apr 11 - 12:06 PM
Jack Campin 13 Apr 11 - 12:20 PM
leeneia 13 Apr 11 - 12:31 PM
JohnInKansas 13 Apr 11 - 12:36 PM
GUEST,Peter (Guest) 13 Apr 11 - 12:36 PM
JohnInKansas 13 Apr 11 - 01:06 PM
leeneia 13 Apr 11 - 03:05 PM
Nick 13 Apr 11 - 03:12 PM
Nick 13 Apr 11 - 03:27 PM
Jack Campin 13 Apr 11 - 04:01 PM
PoppaGator 13 Apr 11 - 05:03 PM
PoppaGator 13 Apr 11 - 05:06 PM
JohnInKansas 13 Apr 11 - 06:45 PM
Little Robyn 13 Apr 11 - 09:36 PM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 12:09 AM
IvanB 14 Apr 11 - 12:34 AM
Rob Naylor 14 Apr 11 - 07:24 AM
McGrath of Harlow 14 Apr 11 - 07:45 AM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 10:00 AM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 10:30 AM
Bounty Hound 14 Apr 11 - 12:30 PM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 03:32 PM
JohnInKansas 14 Apr 11 - 04:24 PM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 04:36 PM
leeneia 14 Apr 11 - 06:26 PM
IvanB 14 Apr 11 - 11:54 PM
Little Robyn 15 Apr 11 - 12:02 AM
leeneia 15 Apr 11 - 08:46 AM
The Fooles Troupe 15 Apr 11 - 07:24 PM
Gurney 16 Apr 11 - 02:52 AM
Nick 16 Apr 11 - 08:17 AM
GUEST,leeneia 16 Apr 11 - 11:06 AM
JohnInKansas 16 Apr 11 - 05:54 PM
ripov 16 Apr 11 - 07:34 PM
Don Firth 17 Apr 11 - 02:28 PM
Lonesome EJ 17 Apr 11 - 02:34 PM
Don Firth 17 Apr 11 - 02:41 PM
The Fooles Troupe 17 Apr 11 - 07:15 PM
JohnInKansas 17 Apr 11 - 09:14 PM
GUEST,leeneia 17 Apr 11 - 10:11 PM
Lonesome EJ 17 Apr 11 - 10:19 PM
IvanB 17 Apr 11 - 10:58 PM
IvanB 18 Apr 11 - 11:24 PM
The Fooles Troupe 18 Apr 11 - 11:50 PM
GUEST,leeneia 19 Apr 11 - 09:33 AM
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Subject: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 10:51 AM

If you've been following the thread on sound systems, you'll know that my church has some new people.

One new member wants to play guitar with me when I play recorder. Trouble is, she told me she went through a windshield and has memory problems. So she wishes that our music could have those little drawings that show the guitar strings and have little dots for where fingers go.

This ought to be doable. Right?

Does anybody know how?

My plan is to print the music (sticks and dots) with Noteworthy and then run the paper through the printer once again, with the little charts at the bottom.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: theleveller
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 11:03 AM

Get ChordAlchemy - it's a brilliant program that lets your find chords and also make chord diagrams which you can then import into other documents. Try Googling it - you're sure to find it.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Bounty Hound
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 11:04 AM

Frets font for windows available for free download here:

http://www.dafont.com/frets-abc.font

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Stringsinger
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 11:30 AM

What about for Mac? All the above seems Window-based.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 12:06 PM

Thanks very much, Leveller and BountyHound.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Jack Campin
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 12:20 PM

Chances are she only needs half a dozen chords.

Why get some chord diagrams made into rubber stamps so they can be applied at the right point in the music?


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 12:31 PM

Well, let's see. I'm going to start typing what I consider common-or-garden chords.

A AM B BM C D DM E EM F F# F#M G
A7 B7 C7 D7 E7 G7

That's 19. Though F# might not be considered common. I have needed it on occasion.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 12:36 PM

I haven't used Noteworthy enough to know all its features, but every other scoring program I've used has been able to insert fret diagrams and/or chord names above the staff with lyrics below, so that only one printing is needed. The programs come with the "fret diagram fonts" necessary.

None of the programs we use regularly were free, but none were particularly expensive if you're intending to do any significant amount of simple scoring; and I'm sure there are freeware programs available with that capability.

If your player really needs the fret diagrams, it's likely that the conventional score is of little use to that player, so you may be able to just type the lyrics with the fret diagrams appropriately above for the guitar player. If you use a monospaced font like Courier to type everything except the diagrams, and change to the appropriate fret font just where you insert a chord diagram, spacing alternate lines in Word should be fairly simple, although the "more elegant" solution I'd use would be to use the Word "array field" to line them up precisely with each other and avoid the "twiddling" otherwise needed.

FretsA, FretsB, and FretsC are names of fonts commonly distributed with programs, and you should be able to snatch them - or something very similar - off the web. If you get a TrueType font, once they're copied into your Fonts folder in Windows, the "Character Map" should show you what the characters look like. Other font types usually will show there, but I can't offer assurances about all the diffeent varieties.

A problem with typing the fret diagrams into text (or onto scores) just by selecting a different font is that most such fonts use a significantly different "scaling" than common letter fonts, so a legible fret picture may need to be at something more like 30 to 50 point "size" to match 12 or 14 point letter characters, and that blows away the linewise spacing. You'll need to select a font and do some trial-and-messy experimenting to see whether this will be a problem, if you choose that method.

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: GUEST,Peter (Guest)
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 12:36 PM

Cajun musician: "You need at least three chords for Cajun music - G, D, and I've forgotten the other one!"


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 01:06 PM

Of course you can use the old-fashioned pre-compute-everything method.

Find a frets font1 and print the ones you need, spaced well apart so you can separate them. If you need a dozen different chords, I'd suggest at least a half dozen of each on your "master page," suitably labelled for easy selection. Size them before printing to match the size you want on the scores.

(Note that there are multiple fingerings for common chords, so it might be a good idea to ask your player which are preferred.)

Make several prints.

Cut the picture you want out of the printed sheet. An X-Acto knife works okay but I have a 30 year old pocket knife that works better 'cause I sharpened it properly. You can also use scissors if you have a sharp pair.

Paste the little pictures on the score. (I prefer rubber cement for easiest removal of smeared goop.)

Scan and print the "paste-up."

A common problem is that the edges where you cut the "pasties" out may show in the scan. Paint the cut edges with "whiteout" or "liquid paper" after gluing them down and they can usually be made to disappear in the scan; but be sure that the whiteout is completely dry before you scan/copy it or you'll really mess up the scanner/copy machine. Believe it or not office supply stores still stock the stuff, although most office workers today have no idea what it's for. I use it mostly for labelling plastic tools that are too "rubbery" to engrave, and to make illegible markings stand out clearly.

1 With this method you could just copy (or scan/print) pages out of a music book that has the right chord diagrams, and cut the pasties out of the copies.

(This method worked for at least 40 years down at the office before I managed to steal even a typewriter to work with.)

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 03:05 PM

Hi, John. I looked at the list of fonts on my program, and I don't see any font that sounds like a frets font.

The woman who wants to play with me has had twelve years of piano. She's just lost confidence since going through a windshield. (See first post.)

I'm not interested in putting the diagrams above the music. Even at the gracious pace we play, she couldn't decode them fast enough. The goal is to put diagrams below the music where she can check them beforehand and build up her confidence.

I am hoping that chords will come back to her, sort of like knitting. It never really goes away.

Bounty Hound gave me a link to a site:

http://www.dafont.com/frets-abc.font

but I can't figure out how to scan it to make sure it's safe. I looked at my antivirus software, but no soap.

Any suggestions?


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Nick
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 03:12 PM

Try Will Fly (PM perhaps?) - (if he doesn't mind being asked) - he does it very well and I think helped the last person who asked


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Nick
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 03:27 PM

C purl2 F slip2 G and knit 6 till the vocals come in

It's a new world


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Jack Campin
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 04:01 PM

You could make some fret diagrams using the online generator at

http://sniff.numachi.com/~rickheit/pm/chord/chord

then save them in some graphic file format, copying the ones you want. Keep them handy somewhere and copy/paste into your staff notation file.

(I know how to do that on a Mac - does Noteworthy generate an editable image file?)

Rubber stamps would be a lot quicker if each score page is a one-off.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: PoppaGator
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 05:03 PM

Will your friend really need the diagrams, rather than just the (one- or two-letter) names of the chords?

I would think that she would know the shape of a "C" or an "Am"; if not, I don't see how she would have time to "read" the little dots on the chord diagrams. Maybe I'm wrong, and a quick glance would be enough to remind her how to make a "C" or "D" or "G7" or whatever.

Either way, you only have to do this to accommodate one person, so an ability to print multiple copies is not really necessary. The idea of having a little rubber-stamp made for each chord is interesting, and would do the trick, but the cost might be prohibitive.

The digital equivalent of a set of rubber-stamps would be a set of little graphics files ~ <.jpg>s or <.bmp>s, etc. Scan 'em in, size 'em appropriately, save them under their chord-names, and then -- in your Word document or whatever -- insert a line above each existing line of "dots" and simply , with wordspaces before and after, each plce that requries a chord symbol. The wordspaces can be in any type size you wish without affecting the size of the picture files; you'll need to be consistent, and will probably want to stick with the same size that's in effect for the rest of the document.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: PoppaGator
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 05:06 PM

My bad ~ I used brackets inappropriately, and part of what I typed was omitted because it was seen as html code:

...and simply , with wordspaces before and after, INSERT ONE OF YOUR GRAPHICS AT each place that requires a chord symbol....


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 06:45 PM

leenia -

My Norton Internet Security gives dafont a clean bill. No threats, no trackers, no malware, and no annoyances.

Site Rating: Safe
Status: OK

dafont.com

Summary
Norton Safe Web found no issues with this site.
•Computer Threats: 0
•Identity Threats: 0
•Annoyance factors:   0
   
Total threats on this site: 0
   
•Community Reviews:   4

The Norton rating is a result of Symantec's automated analysis system. Learn more.
The opinions of our users are reflected separately in the community rating on the right

Threat Report
Total threats found: 0

Viruses (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Drive-By Downloads (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Malicious Downloads (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Worms (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Suspicious Applications (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Suspicious Browser Changes (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Security Risks (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Heuristic Viruses (what's this?) Threats found: 0
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Trojans (what's this?) Threats found: 0
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Information Stealers (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Dialers (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Downloaders (what's this?) Threats found: 0
Embedded Link To Malicious Site (what's this?) Threats found: 0


It's still remotely possible that an individual file you might download could be infected with something, but your own AV should block anything like that before it can do any harm. Scan before you open, copy, or install, if you have any doubts.

Norton shows the site as "known" and "clean" so far as can be determined without "search and destroy" methods.

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Little Robyn
Date: 13 Apr 11 - 09:36 PM

'Mozart' will do it for you too.
But maybe she just needs a guitar chord chart sitting beside her as a prompt.
I've taught a collegue the chords for various songs and he always pauses when I say F#minor or C# or Bminor etc so on his copy of the songs I've quickly drawn a little box with the chord shapes and he's happy. He knows all the straight forward basic chords and can play anything in A or D or G but now he's good in E or B..... as long as he has a prompt for the tricky chords.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 12:09 AM

thanks very much for checking that, John. I appreciate it.

Poppagator, I should mention that the hopeful guitarist has not been playing for a while. She needs a refresher and a little extra confidence. My theory is that she will refer to the diagrams while practicing for the service to come.

She did tell me that she does more than strum, so that's a good sign.

Playing in church (we will be doing the offertory) is not like playing on the front porch. There is no beer, and everybody's paying attention. This can be daunting. So if she asks for the diagrams and it's not too much trouble, why not do it?

Ya know, in my time spent playing music with friends, I have come to realize that musical education can be very patchy. I had a friend who could play Bach and Beethoven on his guitar, but he didn't know any chords.

Another friend can improvise rock in 5/4 time on the harp but has a bad time reading a simple Renaissance dance.

Another can play recorder but doesn't know the names of the notes. To her, the second space from the bottom = two fingers. She doesn't know it's an A.

Another guitarist knows every chord there is and has a veritable battery of special effects, yet she couldn't play even the simplest tune WITH anybody. It was a big day when we all ended at the same time. (Orff got us past that one.)

So a person who's had 12 years of piano lessons but has gone through a windshield should right in.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: IvanB
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 12:34 AM

The frets fonts at dafont.com are fine, but be aware they don't provide the chord names with the individual fret diagrams. Thus, to use them, you'll have to determine the chord you want, find a fret diagram for it from some standardized chord chart, then look it up in the frets font and enter the corresponding character code onto your page.

If you use Open Office, you could open its drawing program while you have an online guitar chord chart up (it must be one which uses an individual file for each chord rather than one which uses one file for a whole group of chords). A good one I found is at http://www.guitarchords247.com/

There's a small chart of a few basic chords on the page linked, but in the top banner note a listing labeled "Browse by Root Note" with a list of the 12 notes of the scale. Clicking on any of those will give a large number of chords with the chosen root. Scroll down to find the chord you want, right click on it and choose "Copy Image." Then activate OO Draw, right click on the page and choose "Paste" Draw defaults to pasting the image in the center of the page, but you can easily drag it to the bottom of the page. Using this method you could pretty easily do customized chord sets for each piece of music you perform together. Alternatively, you could choose any number of chords, save them in a Draw file and use this file to pick and choose your chords for later use.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Rob Naylor
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 07:24 AM

Hmmm, this could all end in tears:

The Trial of Ralph McTell


:-)


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 07:45 AM

Ended in a 404 message...

I think many guitarists might find chord names easier to follow than chord diagrams.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 10:00 AM

The chord names will be there, rest assured. The fret diagrams will be an aide memoire. I hope

Ivan, thanks for the observation. I realized that, but I have no trouble recognizing the most famous chords - you know, A, D, G and E.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 10:30 AM

Okays, guys! No more philosophy. I need a little help.

I downloaded the file that John had checked for me. It is called frets_abc.zip and it's in My Documents.

I went to WordPad and opened it, and all I get is a mass of symbols. Little squares and such. That's no help.

What exactly was I supposed to do after downloading it?

(It occurs to me that if I could get it to show up on my list of fonts, then I could get Noteworthy to use it as a 'User Defined' font.)


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Bounty Hound
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 12:30 PM

What you need to do is to click on the zip file to open it in the same way as you would open any other folder. You will then see in the menu on the left 'extract all files' click on this and a wizard appears, follow the instructions in the wizard and it will create a new unzipped folder with the extracted files. You then open that new folder, and in there you will find the three font files. these you need to move or copy to the folder called 'Fonts' in your windows system folder. you will then find they will appear in the list of fonts in your word processor and any other programme that uses fonts.

Hope that helps

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 03:32 PM

I'm halfway there. I've got the files unzipped and displayed in a window.

I can't find "the folder called Fonts in my windows system folder." When I looked in My Computer and clicked on Windows it said, "These files are hidden so you can't mess them up."

I did a search, and my computer claims that there is no file or folder named Fonts. Yeah, right.

Could you explain a bit more about finding "the folder called Fonts in my windows system folder" ?


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 04:24 PM

Fonts is at C:\Windows\Fonts in my Vista.

If you click on the C:\ drive in Windows Explorer, the toolbar at the top should show a "Tools" button.

On the drop-down Tools menu, there should be a "Folder Options" choice.

At Folder Options there should be a View tab.

On the View tab there should be a list of choices, that includes "show hidden and system files" or something like that. On some versions it showed "hide hidden and system files."

Check or uncheck that box, whichever is appropriate to show them, and you should be able to see the Fonts folder.

Note that in the above the term "should" means:

"It's been about five years since I've looked at WinXP, and hardly anybody can find anything in Vista, and I've never seen Win7, but that's where I think it oughta be."

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 04:36 PM

Thank you, Bounty Hound and John!

I did it!


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 06:26 PM

I just printed a set of the cutest little diagrams for D,G,A and E. I added the proper letters below. It looks like 'All Things Bright and Beautiful' is going to fly!

But there's a snag. Where are the 7th chords among the diagrams?

Here's the site:

fret pics

I can find only one common-or-garden 7th chord, and that's a D7 in the second row from the bottom. It's marked with an e with an umlaut and 0235. How does that work? The 0235 is on a chart somewhere, right?

And if anybody has any idea on how to find A7, G7, and E7, would you please let me know.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: IvanB
Date: 14 Apr 11 - 11:54 PM

If you hold down the Alt key and press the four digit code on the number pad, the diagram will appear on your page at the cursor position.

As for the second part of your question, I tried A7 and didn't find it. Gave up with that.

Just a query: how do you get the symbols to print at the bottom of your NWC printout? I haven't found any way to change the page layout to any great extent and the only things NWC prints at the bottom of the page seem to be the copyright notice/all rights reserved.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Little Robyn
Date: 15 Apr 11 - 12:02 AM

The site Jack Campin gave earlier has allsorts including the 7ths - just type in the chord you're looking for and you'll find more than you'll ever need.
Check this out.

Robyn


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Apr 11 - 08:46 AM

Hello, Ivan. Thanks for explaining about the alt key.

"how do you get the symbols to print at the bottom of your NWC printout?"

I have to use two programs. I use Noteworthy to print the music.

After I got the Frets fonts into my fonts, I made a document that has all the chords I'm likely to use. Then I typed their names (A,G, Em, etc) under them.

After the music has been printed by Noteworthy, I go to the Notepad doc select the chord diagrams needed. I got to Page Layout and set the top margin at about 9 inches (or as needed) and run the page through the printer again, printing the diagrams below the song.
========
Robyn, I will check your link. Thanks.

It's a little trouble, but I think it's worth it to coax a person to get the guitar out from under the bed. We had our first practice last night, and she was nervous but game to keep trying.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 15 Apr 11 - 07:24 PM

"But there's a snag. Where are the 7th chords among the diagrams?"

If know enough music theory sufficient to know the difference between the V & V7 chords - a little practice thinking about it will improve your abilities! :) - you can modify the diagrams by hand as needed to 'move a note around' ... :-)


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Gurney
Date: 16 Apr 11 - 02:52 AM

There's a site called Incompetech that does all sort of graphs, including guitar necks, free. You'd have to put in your own dots.
Very useful site, sometimes.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Nick
Date: 16 Apr 11 - 08:17 AM

You might try Power Tab Editor which I used to use

It is extinct now but it's free and downloadable from Power Tab

It has loads of chord diagrams and might do what you want if you put a littl learning in


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 16 Apr 11 - 11:06 AM

Gurney and Nick, thanks for the links. I'll look into them when I get the taxes done.

Gurney, I was actually wishing for a diagram with no dots so I could make my own. As a mediocre player, I use a number of custom (i.e. feeble) fingerings.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 16 Apr 11 - 05:54 PM

I have a font named "Anastasia" on my computer that includes two pairs of blank guitar fret diagram grids. I don't know where that font came from but suspect it was included with one of my several notation programs. If it's not on your machine, you might be able to find it by searching the web(?), although without a known source the same name often appears on fonts with different character sets.

In my Anastasia, Hex character number 008E has a heavier bar at the top indicating the nut, so would be useful only for "1st position" chords, but hex char 008F has all the horizontals the same weight. You'd number the top one to show what fret it locates on (or where to put the capo).

A peculiarity of the Anastasia font is that when you type an E or F in Word with that font set it immediately changes to something else. Thus you can't enter those glyphs by typing the Hex char number with Anastasia set as the font. You can, in Word, use the decimal equivalents with the Alt-Numpad method to insert them, using 0142 for the one with the nut and 0143 for the one without.

Since Anastasia is a "non-text" font, it may not show in Word's font selection box even if it's properly placed in C:\Windows\Fonts, so you may have to type the name there, with the characters you want to format selected, and hit enter. If the font is in C:\Windows\Fonts Word will use it, even though it doesn't show in the font selection box.

Character Map shows an identical pair in Anastasia at 488E and 488F, but since I have a real (Unicode compliant) font with those character numbers, and those numbers are outside the range used by Office font pages, I haven't figured out how to get them to display the Anastasia glyphs since it "reverts" to the Chinese font that Unicode assigns the numbers to.

Since you may not be able to find the same Anastasia that I have, the "how to" of getting it into Word is mostly to suggest that you may encounter similar difficulties with any font you find that has the character picture you want, since the available fonts will have the pictures translated to numbers normally assigned to other glyphs. Windows Character Map will tell you what the Hex Character Numbers are for any character in the font, but for numbers that convert to decimal values with four or fewer digits the Alt-NumPad method may work better.

Unicode assigns the hex character number 1D11C (decimal 119053) to an empty 6-string fretboard and 1D11D (decimal 119054) to a four string one, but no common font that I know of includes characters in that range (above about Hex FFFE = Decimal 65534).

The FretsA, FretsB, and FretsC that likely are the most common ones used for fret diagrams in notation programs do not include a blank fret box in the versions I have - which is somewhat surprising.

Simplify:

Draw the diagram you want. Scan to jpg. Scale as desired. Make a sheet with a dozen or two of them on it and print. Cut and paste onto music pages as needed. Make a copy if you're afraid the paste won't hold it together.

Or take the picture in and have a rubber stamp made.

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: ripov
Date: 16 Apr 11 - 07:34 PM

To print chord shapes across the bottom of the page in Noteworthy (which I think is what you want?) go to "page setup>fonts>page small text". Click "modify", and choose your fret font, and size 72. Go back to the main programme, go to "file>info", delete the first copyright message, and enter the diagrams you want here. (I can't help you with this bit, never could play guitar! but try entering "a" "b" "c", and then close page setup and hit print review, you'll get the idea).
I use "Font Explorer" from Moon Software (free) to see the characters (about 180 of them in "FretsA"), maximised this gives a better view than windows' built in viewer, and you can copy from it and paste into NWC or Windows notepad. If you open a normal font as well you'll see which letter corresponds to which shape.

good luck

Tony


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Don Firth
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 02:28 PM

Leeneia, if push comes to shove, you don't really need 7th chords.   One can play perfectly adequate accompaniments without ever playing a 7th chord and the vast majority of people, including most trained musicians, won't even notice their lack.

A 7th chord contains a diminished fifth, or "tritone." At one time, this was considered "the Devil in music" and it was a big "No-no!!" The first time it was used, and the composer got away with it, was by Monteverdi, in a madrigal arrangement of "Sumer is a-comin' in." At the very ending, one voice, as it was descending, was on the fourth note of the scale and another voice, ascending, was on the leading tone (half step below the tonic). The two notes formed an interval of a diminished fifth, which is dissonant. It creates musical tension and tends to pull the notes involved in two different directions, thus alleviating the tension. In the madrigal arrangement, the upper voice dropped a half-step to the third of the scale, and the lower note moved up to the tonic.

The point (and the basic point of all 7th chords) is to create a momentary dissonance or tension—the triton—that the ear subconsciously wants to hear resolved—as in, "Drop the other shoe!"

You could accompany something in the key of G, for example, with G, C, and D, without using the D7 at all (using a straight D instead of a D7), and it would take a fairly sophisticated ear to even notice.

In fact, when Monteverdi's arrangement was first performed (the first "official," i.e., historically documented, use of a seventh chord by a recognized composer), one critic was absolutely outraged, saying "The human ear will never grow to tolerated such dissonance!" Wrong! The tritone is the famous "flatted fifth" in jazz.

But a Dominant 7th chord is not essential for correct harmony. The straight Dominant (no triton in the chord) is all that's necessariy. The triton is sort of like adding a subtle touch of spice to the stew.

Hmm! Just occurred to me. If the two of you will be performing in a church service (offeratory), it might be historically appropriate to omit "the Devil in music" from your performance.   {:-)

Good luck! Have fun!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 02:34 PM

Leenia, I admire your courage!


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Don Firth
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 02:41 PM

That should read "tritone" (as in "tri-tone"), not "triton" (which is the largest moon of Neptune, named after a minor Greek god of the sea). Damned Microsoft Word autocorrect feature!

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 07:15 PM

I totally support Don's comment about not really 'needing' 7ths chords.

In fact I mention in the Accordion for Recycled Musos thread - intended for those who already play an instrument and know some music theory to play the piano accordion in a short time.

Indeed, for folk music, some of the smaller accordions that have a 7th row in the Bass side, usually do not have the sub-bass row - a great pity as it would make the instruments far more playable in a wider range of music.

As I said in that thread, if you really NEED that note in that chord, either somebody else in the group is already playing it, or the melody itself (even if just the singer) contains it.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 09:14 PM

An old, and probably seldom observed now, rule of "composing" was that successive chords should have a note in common. i.e. don't change all the notes when you change chords. The common chord progressions pretty much follow this "overlapping chords" notion in much of our music.

The 7th of the chord you're playing is most appropriately used when it "suggests" what chord comes next, especially for leading into a key change. It's especially appropriate to ignore the 7th in the chord if the note is present, or can be "graced in," in the melody or counterpoint lines.

It would seem that chords include the 7th fairly often now only because the guitar player gets lost if there's no place to put that extra finger. It's usually harmless, and most of us are so accustomed to it by now that it's not noticed if it's there or elsewhere. And it's not very necessary to "lead" if everybody knows where they're going.

In more "free form" sessions, it can be essential unless you like listening to multiple players doing simultaneous different tunes in an assortment of keys. And even in cases of that sort, pulling it all back together can be a lot of fun; and all you have to do is say "we were trying out a new jazz riff."

John


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 10:11 PM

Thanks, Lonesome EJ. But it's not so much courage as doggedness that gets the job done.

ripov, thanks for the tips. That will save me time.

As for the 7th chords, I rarely use them. Today, for example, we had harp, autoharp, guitar, and two flutes/recorders playing in small living room, which has a hardwood floor. If there's a C in the melody and the guitarist is playing a D chord, the dissonance happens naturally. The room is so live that adding more dissonance is too much. As John said, the note is already present in the melody.

And yet I arranged a little postlude for guitar and violin, and I concluded that it just has to have an A7 chord in the next-to-last measure. However, we're talking a much bigger space here.

We did 'Kingsfold' (Star of the County Down) today. I wrote an alto part, so we did a duet for silver flute and tenor recorder. Halfway through it, soft chords began to come from the vicinity of the grand piano. Mysterious!

The woman who went through a windshield brought her guitar, but she didn't get it tuned in time. Ah well, it's Palm Sunday and we had the neighborhood march to the park, so things were not quite normal. Or maybe it was cold feet. We shall see.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 10:19 PM

OK, I admire your doggedness too.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: IvanB
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 10:58 PM

leenia, I've been looking for chord diagram programs that allow some creative freedom when doing "custom" diagrams. One I found is QuikChord, found here: http://www.qwikchord.com/portal/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=30&Itemid=10

If you want to have complete creative freedom, Inkscape is a free drawing program that I used to create a chord diagram template with a set of drag and drop elements for creating chords, showing open or muted strings, etc. If you want to give it a try, it's here http://inkscape.org/download/

BTW, I've sent you a PM, so you may want to log in and retrieve it.


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: IvanB
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 11:24 PM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 11:50 PM

"Halfway through it, soft chords began to come from the vicinity of the grand piano"

Not magic - it's normal and called 'resonance' ... unless you get deafened by 10,000 watts of amplification :-)

If you have all tuned your instruments to A=440, then it also proves that the piano is in tune ... :-)


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Subject: RE: print guitar chord thingies on music
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 19 Apr 11 - 09:33 AM

Actually, it was our violinist, who couldn't bear to be left out of something so lovely. She was improvising.

Ivan B, thank you. I'll check out QuikChord and Inkscape.


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