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Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'

GUEST,Laura Plummer 02 May 11 - 05:23 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 02 May 11 - 09:19 PM
Artful Codger 02 May 11 - 09:39 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 03 May 11 - 02:15 AM
Artful Codger 03 May 11 - 03:01 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 03 May 11 - 04:05 PM
Artful Codger 03 May 11 - 11:46 PM
GUEST,Grishka 04 May 11 - 09:55 AM
GUEST,Grishka 04 May 11 - 03:12 PM
GUEST,BigDaddy 04 May 11 - 03:17 PM
GUEST,Laura Plummer, N Ireland 08 Jul 11 - 09:51 AM
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Subject: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,Laura Plummer
Date: 02 May 11 - 05:23 PM

does anyone know the history of this song Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'or it's translation?
I have lyrics and sheet music but no translation or background information

Voro voro Ivanicci, voro voro Ivanicc

Jestofar, jestofar, voro Ivanici
Jestofar, jestofar, voro Ivanic


Marie, Maria, Marie, Maria
Marie, Marusch kaia


many thanks

Laura P


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 02 May 11 - 09:19 PM

Apparently it's spelled Ivanicki. Also Ivanicky. Ivanicki is a place-name in, I believe, the Ukraine, as well as a surname form the area. It's pronounced eevaneetchkee. Maruschka (or Marushka) is a woman's name and an Eastern European variant of Mary, Maria (as in the Virgin Mary). It appears that the song is also known as "Whatever It May Be." Check your spelling of the lyrics. I'll see what more I can find. I suspect it's an old folk song honoring the Blessed Virgin.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: Artful Codger
Date: 02 May 11 - 09:39 PM

It seems mostly sung by Czech choirs (listed as "Voro Ivaničky", and most of their repertoire lists indicate simply "folk", even when they denote the nationality of other folk songs. However, judging by my knowledge of both Czech and Russian, while Ivanička and Maruška are typical diminutives of the names Ivana and Maria, neither "voro" nor "jestofar" translate. One Czech choir clearly categorizes it as a foreign song, and elsewhere it is attributed as Estonian, Bulgarian or Ukrainian, though online translators do not recognize voro or jestofar in these languages either. The song often bears a translated title of "Whatever it may be" (or are they referring to the nationality of the song?) Having the full lyrics would help.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 03 May 11 - 02:15 AM

There's a lovely performance by a Hungarian choir known as Serenus conducted by Margit Brusznyai in Vác, Hungary, available on YouTube (http://youtu.be/_4_Vyzg26JY). Apart from that, ditto, Artful Codger. There's a lovely article by Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés that may relate to this song where she says, "My grandmother said that if you listened to stories about Mother Maria for nine weeks straight without interruption ... or if you said the rosary for nine days straight without your mind wandering once ... or if you walked to one of Mama Marushka's shrines in the woods for nine nights in a row -- nine being the number of months Blessed Mother carried the living Christo before giving birth to the Light of the world -- that if you would do any of these, that Blessed Mother would appear to you and answer any question you might have about how to live on earth fully ensouled."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: Artful Codger
Date: 03 May 11 - 03:01 PM

Isn't that called "brainwashing"? It's certainly a form of self-hypnosis. I imagine the same technique would work to experience an alien abduction.

Earliest mention I found for this song was in a book (unviewable) written in 1984, even though all the clips appear to use the exact same (and presumably recent) choral arrangement. A couple of the repertoire lists had this song listed as a "Humorous song"; I didn't notice it ever being grouped with carols, aside from appearing on several Christmas programs. Nor does the music strike me as typical for religious songs. And Maria is a common name; many Marias in song bear little resemblance to their namesake in character.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 03 May 11 - 04:05 PM

I defer to you, oh Artful Codger...I have no particular religious drum to beat. Just speculating. It's a pretty song (at least as sung by the aforementioned choir) and I'd like to know its lyrics and meaning. If we could get the lyrics as they are supposed to be spelled, we'd probably get somewhere with this.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: Artful Codger
Date: 03 May 11 - 11:46 PM

Don't defer; every scrap of information helps, and I may be wildly wrong.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,Grishka
Date: 04 May 11 - 09:55 AM

In the comment of this YouTube from Maribor in Slovenia, it is called an "invented song", maybe a parody of typical folk songs (love songs, hence the hilarity). However, "voro" does not seem to be a Slovenian word either. There are several Russian songs starting "Voro-, voro-", which have nothing to do with Ivanički (definitely not Russian!).

Summary: probably a panslavic joke by some choral composer / choirmaster. More information or guesswork is required.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,Grishka
Date: 04 May 11 - 03:12 PM

At second listening, I think the hilarity is due to an additional verse invented by the choir, uttering some slogan about their Department of Medicine at Maribor University. But also in the Czech performances the song as such is presented as funny.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,BigDaddy
Date: 04 May 11 - 03:17 PM

Here's another YouTube version that certainly makes it seem it is humorous: http://youtu.be/ixs9oDiOhpA


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Subject: RE: Origins: Russian song 'Voro Voro Ivanicci'
From: GUEST,Laura Plummer, N Ireland
Date: 08 Jul 11 - 09:51 AM

many thanks to everyone who has posted info/comments re my original request. will keep singing it with our folk choir regardless of its origins or meaning as we love it so much!!


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