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Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away

DigiTrad:
ALL HAIL TO THE DAYS


Related thread:
Help: In Praise of Christmas (17)


BeauDangles 17 Sep 99 - 01:41 PM
hotspur 17 Sep 99 - 03:28 PM
MMario 17 Sep 99 - 03:30 PM
Bruce O. 17 Sep 99 - 04:37 PM
Matthew B. 17 Sep 99 - 06:32 PM
GUEST,L10 JON Boy. . . that's Elton John Boy . . t 09 Dec 04 - 03:43 AM
John in Brisbane 12 Jan 05 - 08:32 PM
Linda Mattson 13 Jan 05 - 03:13 AM
Jim Dixon 15 Jan 05 - 04:47 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Jan 05 - 06:02 PM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Jan 05 - 07:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Jan 05 - 10:58 PM
chico 17 Apr 05 - 02:11 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 17 Apr 05 - 04:22 AM
CapriUni 20 Dec 05 - 11:16 AM
CapriUni 23 Dec 05 - 02:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Dec 05 - 03:13 PM
CapriUni 23 Dec 05 - 04:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Dec 05 - 04:37 PM
chico 23 Dec 05 - 06:41 PM
chico 23 Dec 05 - 06:42 PM
CapriUni 23 Dec 05 - 10:35 PM
Joe Offer 22 Dec 10 - 03:37 AM
Mysha 27 Jan 13 - 05:12 PM
Mo the caller 27 Jan 13 - 05:46 PM
RTim 27 Jan 13 - 11:13 PM
GUEST,leeneia 28 Jan 13 - 12:25 AM
RTim 28 Jan 13 - 08:29 AM
GUEST,leeneia 28 Jan 13 - 09:50 AM
GUEST,sciencegeek 28 Jan 13 - 10:53 AM
RTim 28 Jan 13 - 01:27 PM
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Mo the caller 05 Feb 13 - 07:07 PM
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Subject: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: BeauDangles
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 01:41 PM

Hey guys,

I am looking for lyrics & chords to Robin Williamson's version of Drive the Cold Winter Away. It was on Winter's Turning. It is similar to two songs in the database, but not quite there. I had some trouble with his accent.

Any comers?

BeauDangles


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: hotspur
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 03:28 PM

I don't know that particular recording, but I do know a song by that name which begins:

All hail to the days that merit more praise Than all of the rest of the year And welcome the nights that double delights As well for the poor as the peer Good fortune attend each merry man's friend That doth but the best that he may Forgetting old wrongs in carols and songs (?) to drive the cold winter away.

If that's what you're looking for, it's in the Oxford Book of Carols.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: MMario
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 03:30 PM

I don't think I've heard two renditions of this song that were the same! There are so many variants....

MMario


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Bruce O.
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 04:37 PM

The song is of the 1620's. It's source is noted at ZN67 in the Broadside Ballad index at www.erols.com.olsonw. ABC's of two tunes for it are B126,126 in the broadside ballad tunes there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Matthew B.
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 06:32 PM

There's a version I have at home of works that Henry VIII took credit for writing, including this one, and it includes the stanza:

Cross out from thy books
Malevolent looks
Both Beauty and youth's decay
And boldly consort
With mirth and with sport
To drive the cold winter away

There's more, but that's all I can remember off the top of my head from the office.


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Subject: Chords Add: DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY
From: GUEST,L10 JON Boy. . . that's Elton John Boy . . t
Date: 09 Dec 04 - 03:43 AM

Cm          Cm/Bb    Cm/Ab      Eb/G
All hail to the days that merit more praise
    Fm                     G
Than all of the rest of the year,
    Cm          Cm/Bb       Cm/Ab    Eb/g
And welcome the nights that double delights
   Fm                      G
As well for the poor as the peer!
    Eb                  Fm      
Good fortune attend each merry man's friend
    Cm          Gm          Cm
That doth but the best that he may,
   Eb                      Fm
Forgetting old wrongs with carols and songs
   Cm             G      Cm
To drive the cold winter away.

This is Loreena's version at least. I just figured it out, may not be right, but its more than i found online. visit my site at www.angelfire.com/la2/barte/xmas.htm . . theres no chords there just stop by!


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Subject: Tune Add: DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 12 Jan 05 - 08:32 PM

Here'an ABC for the tune in Dm:

X: 1
T:Drive the cold winter away
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:3/8=110
F:http://jc.tzo.net/~jc/music/abc/Scotland/jig/DriveTheColdWinterAway.abc 2005-01-13 01:24:37 UT
K:Dm
D|"Dm"F>ED "Dm"A2d|"F"c>BA "F"f2F|"Gm"G2A "Bb"B>cB|"F"A6 ||
"Dm"d|"F"c>BA "F"c2c|"Gm"B>AG "Bb"B2B|"F"A>GF "Am"E2D|"F"f3-"Dm"f2d
|"F"c>BA "F"c2c|"Gm"B>AG "Bb"B2B|"F"A>GF "Am"E>DE|"Dm"D3-D2||

Regards, John


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Linda Mattson
Date: 13 Jan 05 - 03:13 AM

I don't know if the versions are the same, but John Roberts and Tony Barrand sing the stanza supplied two messages back, plus the following:

'Tis ill for a mind to anger incline
To think of small injuries now
If wrath be deceit do not lend to thy cheek
Nor let it inhabit thy brow
Cross out of thy books malevolent looks
Both beauty and youth decay
And wholly consort with mirth and with sport
To drive the cold winter away

This time of the year is spent in good cheer
When neighbors together do meet
To sit by the fire in friendly desire
Each other in love for to greet
All grudges forgot, are put in the pot
All sorrows aside as they lay
The old and the young doth carol this song
To drive the cold winter away

-Linda Mattson


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Subject: Lyr Add: ALL HAIL TO THE DAYS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Jan 05 - 04:47 PM

ALL HAIL TO THE DAYS
[with modernized spelling]

1. All hail to the days
That merit more praise
    Than all the rest of the year!
And welcome the nights
That double delights
    As well for the poor as the peer!
Good fortune attend
Each merry man's friend
    That doth but the best that he may,
Forgetting old wrongs
With carols and songs
    To drive the cold winter away.

2. The Court in all state
Now opens her gate
    And bids a free welcome to most:
The City, likewise,
Though somewhat precise,
    Doth willingly part with her cost;
And yet, by report,
From City and Court
    The country doth get the day:
More liquor is spent,
And better content,
    To drive the cold winter away.

3. The gentry there
For cost do not spare;
    The yeomanry fast in Lent;
The farmers and such
Think nothing too much
    If they keep but to pay their rent.
The poorest of all
Do merrily call
    (Want bears but a little sway)
For a song, or a tale,
Or a pot of good ale,
    To drive the cold winter away.

4. Thus none will allow
Of solitude now,
    But merrily greet the time,
To make it appear
Of all the whole year
    That this is accounted the prime:
December is seen
Apparel'd in green,
    And January, fresh as May,
Comes dancing along
With a cup and a song
    To drive the cold winter away.

5. This time of the year
Is spent in good cheer;
    Kind neighbours together meet
To sit by the fire
With friendly desire
    Each other in love to greet;
Old grudges, forgot,
Are put in the pot,
    All sorrows aside they lay;
The old and the young
Doth carol his song
    To drive the cold winter away.

6. To mask and to mum*
Kind neighbours will come
    With wassails of nut-brown ale,
To drink and carouse
To all in this house,
    As merry as bucks in the pale*;
Where cake, bread and cheese
Is brought for your fees
    To make you the longer stay,
At the fire to warm
Will do you no harm
    To drive the cold winter away.

7. When Christmastide
Comes in like a bride,
    With holly and ivy clad,
Twelve days in the year
Much mirth and good cheer
    In every household is had;
The country guise*
Is then to devise
    Some gambol of Christmas play,
Whereat the young men
Do best that they can
    To drive the cold winter away.

8. When white-bearded Frost
Hath threatened his worst
    And fallen from branch and brier,
Then time away calls
From husbandry halls*
    And from the good countryman's fire,
Together to go
To plow and to sow,
    To get us both food and array;
And thus with content
The time we have spent
    To drive the cold winter away.

[From The New Oxford Book of Carols
    "We give eight of the twelve verses comprising 'A pleasant Countrey new Ditty: Merrily shewing how To drive the cold Winter away', from a broadside in the Pepys Collection. The broadside was printed in the early seventeenth century, though the ballad may predate it."
[*Mum = to act or mime in plays or games (hence "mummer"); pale = enclosed field; guise = custom; husbandry halls = barns and stables.]

[Besides the 8 given in the Oxford book, the only other verse I can find is the following one.]

'Tis ill for a mind
To anger inclined
    To think of small injuries now.
If wrath be to seek,
Do not lend her your cheek,
    Nor let her inhabit thy brow.
Cross out of thy books
Malevolent looks,
    Both beauty and youth's decay,
And wholly consort
With mirth and with sport
    To drive the cold winter away.

[The song is known by various titles. allmusic lists
18 recordings as DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY,
3 as TO DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY,
2 as DRIVE THE COLD WINTER,
2 as ALL HAYLE TO THE DAYES (the title used in the Oxford book),
1 as ALL HAIL TO THE DAYS,
3 as PRAISE OF CHRISTMAS, and
1 as IN PRAISE OF CHRISTMAS.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Jan 05 - 06:02 PM

The version in the DT (sung by Lorena McKinnitt) is in "The Hymns and Carols of Christmas," version 1, "words by Tom Durfey (1653-1723) and Others." The music is said to be 18th c., midi provided.

A version 2 contains verses 1, 5 and 7 of those posted by Jim Dixon. These three appear in the sheet music of Carol # 23, by Martin Shaw and Percy Dearmer, "The English Carol Book, First Series (London; A. R. Mowbray & Co., Ltd. 1913).
A dreary midi is given in the link, below:
All hail


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Jan 05 - 07:57 PM

Roxburghe Ballads (ed. William Chappell, I, 84-88) prints 12 verses as issued by Henry Gosson during the second quarter of the 17th century. Chappell descibes this a reprint of a 16th century piece. He also gives the text, with tune, in Popular Music of the Olden Time (1855, I, 193-195), with more on its history; it becomes clear there than his dating of the song to the C16 rests on a "sacred parody" appearing in A Compendious Book of Godly and Spiritual Songs (1567) which has the same rhythm and a similar occasional refrain.

Thomas D'Urfey (Pills to Purge Melancholy, 1719-1720, IV, 241-242) prints tune and 5 verses (as A New Song. The Good Fellow), variant in some details from those quoted earlier. The tune Drive the Cold Winter Away (which appeared in Playford, Dancing Master, 1651-c.1728) derives its title from the song, for which Gosson's broadside prescribes When Phoebus did rest, which is apparently an earlier form. Simpson (British Broadside Ballad and Its Music, 1966, 197-199) goes into further detail, quoting music from Starter's Friesche Lust-Hof, 1621, and from Playford. See the late Bruce Olson's earlier post in this thread for references to those two tunes, in abc format on his website (currently only available online via the Internet Archive).

Both DT files (see links above) are effectively identical, though for some reason they have been given different titles. They may have been copied from The Oxford Book of Carols (which uses 4 verses of the D'Urfey text, a little edited) or perhaps from the McKennitt record (I think OBC was her source). There isn't much to choose between them: the first is laid out in 4-line stanzas (should be 8 lines each), while the second contains uncorrected typos.

The Oxford comment "the first two verses are by Tom Durfey" is wrong, incidentally (they were in print before he was born); though he may well have altered them a bit.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Jan 05 - 10:58 PM

Comparing Jim Dixon's eight against the twelve printed by Chappell in "Popular Music of the Olden Time," the missing verses are 2, 3, 8, 9; five is somewhat different and the odd word is changed in the others.

2. Let misery pack, with a whip at his back,
To the deep Tantalian flood;
In Lethe profound, let envy be drown'd,
That pines at another man's good;
Let Sorrow's expanse be banded from hence,
All payments of grief delay,
And wholly consort with mirth and with sport
To drive the cold winter away.

3. 'Tis ill for a mind to anger inclin'd
To think of old injuries now;
If wrath be to seek, do not lend her thy cheek,
Nor let her inhabit thy brow.
Cross out of thy books malevolent looks,
Both beauty and youth's decay,
And spend the long nights in honest delights,
To drive the cold winter away.

4. The court in all state---

5. Our good gentry there, for cost do not spare,
The yeomanry fast not till *Lent;
The farmers, and such, think nothing too much,
If they keep but to pay for their rent.
The poorest of all do merrily call,
When at a fit place they can stay,
For a song or a tale, or a pot of good ale,
To drive the cold winter away.

6. Thus none will allow---

The Second Part

7. This time of the year---

8. Sisley and Nancy, more jocund than any,
As blythe as the month of June,
Do carol and sing, like birds of the Spring,
(No nightingale sweeter in tune)
To bring in content, when summer is spent,
In pleasant delight and play,
With mirth and good cheer, to end the old year,
And drive the cold winter away.

9. The shepherd and swain do highly disdain
To waste out their time in care,
And Clim of the Clough** hath plenty enough
If he but a penny can spare,
To spend at the night in joy and delight,
Now after his labours all day,
For better than lands is the help of his hands,
To drive the cold winter away.

10. To mask and to mum---

11. When Christmas's tide comes in like a bride, ---

12. When white-bearded frost ---

"Boldly and not too fast, Song in Praise of Christmas," 6/8, music provided.
Footnotes- *For the support and encouragement of the fishing towns, in the time of Elizabeth, Wednesdays and Fridays were constantly observed as fast days, or days of abstinence from flesh. **Clim of the Clough- Clement of the Cleft (a noted archer, in old ballads).
William Chappell, 1855 (Dover 1965), "Popular Music of the Olden Time," vol, 1, pp. 193-195.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: chico
Date: 17 Apr 05 - 02:11 AM

My take with my chords:

      Am          C       G          Am
All hail to the days that merit more praise
    Dm       F          E
Than all the rest of the year,
    Am          C          G       Am
And welcome the nights that double delights,
   Dm             F          E
As well for the poor as the peer!
       C       G          Dm          F
Good fortune attend each merry man's friend,
      Am            E          G (7)
That doth but the best that he may;
    C            G            Dm         F
Forgetting old wrongs, with carols and songs,
    C             E    Am
To drive the cold winter away.

Let misery pack, with a whip at his back,
To the deep Tantalian flood;
In Lethe profound, let Envy be drown'd,
That pines at another man's good;
Let sorrow's expense be banded from hence,
All payments have greater delay,
We'll spend the long nights in cheerful delights,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

'Tis ill for a mind to anger inclined,
To think of small injuries now;
If wrath be to seek, do not lend her thy cheek,
Nor let her inherit thy brow.
Cross out of thy books malevolent looks,
Both beauty and youth's decay,
And wholly consort, with mirth and with sport,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

The Court in her state, now opens her gate,
And gives a free welcome to most;
The city likewise, though somewhat precise,
Doth willingly part with her roast;
But yet by report, from city and court,
The country will e'er gain the day;
More liquor is spent, and with better content,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Our good gentry there, for cost do not spare,
The Yeomanry fast not till Lent;
The farmers and such, think nothing too much,
If they keep but to pay for their rent.
The poorest of all now do merrily call,
When at a fit place they can stay,
For a song or a tale or a cup of good ale,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Then none will allow of solitude now,
But merrily greets the time,
To make it appear, of all the whole year,
That this is accounted the prime;
December is seen, apparel'd in green,
And January fresh as May
Comes dancing along, with a cup and a song,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

          THE SECOND PART

This time of the year is spent in good cheer,
And neighbours together do meet,
To sit by the fire, with friendly desire,
Each other in love to greet;
Old grudges forgot, are put in the pot,
All sorrows aside they lay,
The old and the young do carol this song,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Sisley and Nanny, more jocund than any,
As blithe as the month of June,
Do carol and sing, like birds in the spring,
No Nightingale sweeter in tune,
To bring in content, when summer is spent,
In pleasant delight and play,
With mirth and good cheer, to end the whole year,
And drive the cold winter away.
               And drive, &c.

The shepherd, the swain, do highly disdain
To waste out their time in care,
And Clim of the Clough hath plenty enough,
If he but a penny can spare
To spend at the night in joy and delight,
Now after his labours all day,
For better than lands is the help of his hands,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

To mask and to mum kind neighbours will come,
With wassels of nut-brown ale,
To drink and carouse, to all in the house,
As merry as bucks in the dale;
Where cake, bread and cheese, is brought for your fees,
To make you the longer stay
At the fire to warm, will do you no harm,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

When Christmas's tide comes in like a bride,
With holly and ivy clad,
Twelve days in the year, much mirth and good cheer,
In every household is had;
The country guise is then to devise
Some gambols of Christmas play,
Whereat the young men do the best that they can
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

When white bearded frost has threatened the worst
And fallen from branch to briar,
Then time away calls from husbandry halls,
And from the good countryman's fire,
Together to go to plow and to sow,
To get us both food and array,
And thus with content the time we have spent
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

As printed by W. H. Logan, The Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and Songs, pp. 293. Reprinted from a Black Letter Copy in the Pepysian Collection; 'Printed at London by H. G.' -- [Henry Gosson.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 17 Apr 05 - 04:22 AM

Just a note about Malcolm's reference to Bruce Olson's website. You no longer need to go to the Internet Archive to get it, the site is available on Mudcat through the Quick Links dropdown at the top of the page (as I had pointed out to me recently, having overlooked its presence myself).

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: CapriUni
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 11:16 AM

I heard this song once, I think it was on a folk music radio special, but I forget which station or show. It certainly deserves to be beard more often.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: CapriUni
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 02:27 PM

Old grudges forgot, are put in the pot, [. . .]

You know, I'd always thought this referred to a cooking pot, but then, last night, the idea occurred to me that this referred to chamber pot.

No one of sane mind would want to feast on old grudges, but flushing them into the river where they will be seen no more is rather apropriate. . . . Don't you think?

And I think, anyone who chooses to end the year by harping on old grudges deserves a certain name that I will not repeat here in polite company.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 03:13 PM

Intriguing thought.

My take is that it refers to 'a pot of good ale' in the First Part, the idea being to drink away old grudges with the ale.

Chappell, in his "Popular Music...," says the song is "a pleasant country new ditty; merrily shewing how to drive the cold winter away. To the tune of "When Phoebus did rest" (footnotes), black-letter, printed by H(enry) G(osson)." Too bad that the author is unknown.
By 'countrey', I presume it did not originate in London.
As well as being a song, the 'ditty' recites well. A great one!


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: CapriUni
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 04:13 PM

By 'countrey', I presume it did not originate in London.

Yes. Especially in context with the slightly derogatory lines:

The City, likewise,
Though somewhat precise,
Doth willingly part with her cost;


Seems that the nature of beaurocracy will never change, no matter how many centuries pass.

One of the many reasons why I think this song should be brought back into popular circulation... Although the nature its "homemade" cheer is not like to win the hearts of commercial retailers...at least, not publicly.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 04:37 PM

If I remember my Samuel Johnson, the only thing he found worth regard in the uncouth areas outside of London was Stilton cheese.


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Subject: Lyr Add: TO DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY
From: chico
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 06:41 PM


      Am          C       G          Am
All hail to the days that merit more praise
    Dm       F          E
Than all the rest of the year,
    Am          C          G       Am
And welcome the nights that double delights,
   Dm             F          E
As well for the poor as the peer!
       C       G          Dm          F
Good fortune attend each merry man's friend,
      Am            E          G (7)
That doth but the best that he may;
    C            G            Dm         F
Forgetting old wrongs, with carols and songs,
    C             E    Am
To drive the cold winter away.

Let misery pack, with a whip at his back,
To the deep Tantalian flood;
In Lethe profound, let Envy be drown'd,
That pines at another man's good;
Let sorrow's expense be banded from hence,
All payments have greater delay,
We'll spend the long nights in cheerful delights,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

'Tis ill for a mind to anger inclined,
To think of small injuries now;
If wrath be to seek, do not lend her thy cheek,
Nor let her inherit thy brow.
Cross out of thy books malevolent looks,
Both beauty and youth's decay,
And wholly consort, with mirth and with sport,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

The Court in her state, now opens her gate,
And gives a free welcome to most;
The city likewise, though somewhat precise,
Doth willingly part with her roast;
But yet by report, from city and court,
The country will e'er gain the day;
More liquor is spent, and with better content,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Our good gentry there, for cost do not spare,
The Yeomanry fast not till Lent;
The farmers and such, think nothing too much,
If they keep but to pay for their rent.
The poorest of all now do merrily call,
When at a fit place they can stay,
For a song or a tale or a cup of good ale,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Then none will allow of solitude now,
But merrily greets the time,
To make it appear, of all the whole year,
That this is accounted the prime;
December is seen, apparel'd in green,
And January fresh as May
Comes dancing along, with a cup and a song,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

          THE SECOND PART

This time of the year is spent in good cheer,
And neighbours together do meet,
To sit by the fire, with friendly desire,
Each other in love to greet;
Old grudges forgot, are put in the pot,
All sorrows aside they lay,
The old and the young do carol this song,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

Sisley and Nanny, more jocund than any,
As blithe as the month of June,
Do carol and sing, like birds in the spring,
No Nightingale sweeter in tune,
To bring in content, when summer is spent,
In pleasant delight and play,
With mirth and good cheer, to end the whole year,
And drive the cold winter away.
               And drive, &c.

The shepherd, the swain, do highly disdain
To waste out their time in care,
And Clim of the Clough hath plenty enough,
If he but a penny can spare
To spend at the night in joy and delight,
Now after his labours all day,
For better than lands is the help of his hands,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

To mask and to mum kind neighbours will come,
With wassels of nut-brown ale,
To drink and carouse, to all in the house,
As merry as bucks in the dale;
Where cake, bread and cheese, is brought for your fees,
To make you the longer stay
At the fire to warm, will do you no harm,
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

When Christmas's tide comes in like a bride,
With holly and ivy clad,
Twelve days in the year, much mirth and good cheer,
In every household is had;
The country guise is then to devise
Some gambols of Christmas play,
Whereat the young men do the best that they can
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

When white bearded frost has threatened the worst
And fallen from branch to briar,
Then time away calls from husbandry halls,
And from the good countryman's fire,
Together to go to plow and to sow,
To get us both food and array,
And thus with content the time we have spent
To drive the cold winter away.
               To drive, &c.

As printed by W. H. Logan, The Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and Songs, pp. 293. Reprinted from a Black Letter Copy in the Pepysian Collection; 'Printed at London by H. G.' -- [Henry Gosson.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: chico
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 06:42 PM

Different Key

      Dm          F       C          Dm
All hail to the days that merit more praise
    Gm       Bb          A
Than all the rest of the year,
    Dm          F          C       Dm
And welcome the nights that double delights,
   Gm             Bb          A
As well for the poor as the peer!
       F       C          Gm          Bb
Good fortune attend each merry man's friend,
      Dm            A          C (7)
That doth but the best that he may;
    F            C            Gm         Bb
Forgetting old wrongs, with carols and songs,
    F             A    Dm
To drive the cold winter away.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: CapriUni
Date: 23 Dec 05 - 10:35 PM

Well, it is true that few things in this world can top a good Stilton, as Wallace and Grommit can testify.

And, to bring this slightly back on topic, a great example of the contrast between Court and Country life (albeit in the hyperbolic and metaphoric tone of the fairy tale) can be seen in Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale -- just compare the paranoid, insane aura of the Court in the first half of the play to the extended view of the Shepherds' feast day in the sendond half (which, btw, has some rather funny parodies of contemporary broadsides, imnsho).


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Dec 10 - 03:37 AM

For December 18: Drive the Cold Winter Away, recorded by Johnny Coppin, is the song for the Properganda Alternative Advent Calendar. The melody sounds modern, but I've heard it from a number of sources. Anybody know the source of this melody?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Mysha
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 05:12 PM

Hi,

I was just given a copy of the "First part" lyrics. Does anyone know what this division in two parts is about?

Bye,
                                                                  Mysha


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Mo the caller
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 05:46 PM

You've reminded me that it is also a Playford Dance (1650) Drive the Cold Winter away

After Friday when I spent most of the Burn's night gig watching the snow falling, and wondering about the journey home, I might use that and In the Fields in Frost and Snow (Playford 1718) next time I call at club.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: RTim
Date: 27 Jan 13 - 11:13 PM

It is also a great tune to Morris Dance to.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 28 Jan 13 - 12:25 AM

Hello, Joe. I have that tune in my book 'English Country Dance Tunes,' collected by Peter Barnes. Barnes wrote 1650 on it, so I assume that it's from Playford's 'Dancing Master,' which was first published in that year.

I wonder if one can still buy this book. I recommend it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: RTim
Date: 28 Jan 13 - 08:29 AM

Hi Again -
I know Peter and the book is still available, and I believe there is now also a Book 2.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 28 Jan 13 - 09:50 AM

Thanks for the info, Tim.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 28 Jan 13 - 10:53 AM

the group Rose Ensemble has a fine recording of this and others on their CD with lyrics :

"And Glory Shown Around: Early American Carols, Country Dances, Southern Harmony Hymns, and Shaker Spiritual Songs".


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: RTim
Date: 28 Jan 13 - 01:27 PM

Here is a link to the Barnes Books, etc..

http://mysite.verizon.net/~peterabarnes/books.htm

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Mysha
Date: 05 Feb 13 - 07:08 AM

Hi,

As a playford dance, could it maybe be no longer then six verses? If so, that would be a reason for splitting it in two.

Bye
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Drive the Cold Winter Away
From: Mo the caller
Date: 05 Feb 13 - 07:07 PM

The Playford dance would be done to the tune, played as many times as needed, without any words.

Actually the dance is rather odd. It says it is for as many as will but there is hardly time, if you play the music as it would be sung, to do it for 4 couples. More than that you would certainly need to play the B extra times.

A lot of Playford dances come in 3 parts. The A music is standard introduction (leading, siding, or arming) and the B music is either a chorus or 3 different figures.
In this the same figure is done by 1st man, then 1st woman, then 1st man again.
And it has been suggested that they would have got the 1st man to the bottom and repeated the 1st figure for each man etc.

So the tune would be played 3 x the number of couples.
I decided not to bother with it - too many questions.
If you want to reconstruct it yourself click the link I gave, click Browse Index of Titles, then scroll down the D page.


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