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Lyr Req: O cad e sin don te sin

Mían 20 Sep 99 - 07:50 PM
Mían 20 Sep 99 - 08:05 PM
Susan-Marie 21 Sep 99 - 01:14 PM
Philippa 21 Sep 99 - 06:42 PM
Mían 21 Sep 99 - 08:05 PM
jaguar 22 Sep 99 - 07:15 PM
Mían 22 Sep 99 - 07:58 PM
Susan-Marie 23 Sep 99 - 01:50 PM
Áine 23 Sep 99 - 02:07 PM
Mían 23 Sep 99 - 02:41 PM
Áine 23 Sep 99 - 03:34 PM
Susan-Marie 23 Sep 99 - 03:47 PM
Mían 23 Sep 99 - 06:01 PM
Áine 24 Sep 99 - 09:53 AM
GUEST,Diarmuid 09 May 11 - 12:51 PM
RunrigFan 09 May 11 - 03:31 PM
GUEST,InquisitiveFrog 02 May 13 - 08:06 AM
GUEST 22 Oct 13 - 04:13 PM
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Subject: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 20 Sep 99 - 07:50 PM

hmmmm, I thought fer sure that this would be posted somewhere.

o bhfuel.

Actually, besides lyrics, does anyone know of any other recorded versions besides that by Clannad (too slow) and Skarra Brae (too fast)?

goldilocks needs something just right. And perhaps with just vocals? (and/or a lighter accompaniment?)

grma (shorthand for thanks)

mían


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 20 Sep 99 - 08:05 PM

Re a version of lyrics, I found them under the starting words "caide sin..." at the following site:

http://www.jtwinc.com/clannad/main.html

I am still interested in other renditions.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 21 Sep 99 - 01:14 PM

Mian - Sang this last year in English because I wanted the listeners to understand the words. I think I learned it from an Altan CD, one of the more recent ones. This is basically their translation adapted by me to fit the tune better:

I went to the market and traded my cow
For five pounds in money and a gold guinea coin
If I drank all the money and the gold I gave away
Since its no-one's concern then no-one should care
If I drank all the money and the gold I gave away
O caide sin do'n te sin nach mbaineann sin do

If I go to the woods gathering berries and flow'rs
Picking apples from bowers and herding the cows
If I lie in the shade for an hour or more
Since it's no-one's concern then no-one should care
If I lie in the shade for an hour or more
O caide sin do'n te sin nach mbaineann sin do

If I go to ceilies to dance and to sport
To market, to races, and things of that sort
If I see people merry and their merriment I share
Since it's no-one's concern then no-one should care
If I see people merry and their merriment I share
O caide sin do'n te sin nach mbaineann sin do

People are saying I'm a cad gone astray
With no gold, no possessions, no cow and no cares
If it's my own desire to live this way
Since it's no-one's concern then no-one should care
If it's my own desire to live this way
O caide sin do'n te sin nach mbaineann sin do


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Subject: caidé sin, cad e sin
From: Philippa
Date: 21 Sep 99 - 06:42 PM

Dála an scéil (by the way), 'cad é' ( = what is) is the standard spelling of the two words, but 'caidé' more faithfully represents the pronounciation. It's sort of a contraction. Some Ulster Irish speakers say and write 'goidé', their pronounciation of 'cad e'.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 21 Sep 99 - 08:05 PM

I just located a sampling of the Altan rendition (on the NetRadio shopping site).

Any other renditions out there?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: jaguar
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 07:15 PM

The only ones I know are the Altan and the Clannad, but I'm sure there's at least one or two more, given all the various Celtic (fill-in-the-blank) compilation CDs out there. I could put up the Gaelic, but that's the first I've heard of the translation (thanks!).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 07:58 PM

BTW, "ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbainean sin do" means roughly, "oh, what is that to someone who doesn't gather such things to himself?" (or "...to someone who doesn't think about about such things?"

so now, would that be an attitude of "who cares?" or more like "tóg é go bog é (take it easy)"

m


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 01:50 PM

Altan's translation isn't strictly literal, but it seems to capture the meaning fairly well, and I've found that most literal translations aren't very singable.

My take on the attitude is that it's something like "to each his own" or, as I said when I sang the song, it's a traditional Irish expression of "mind your own business"!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Áine
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 02:07 PM

A chairde,

The meaning of "cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó" is: "what's that to the person that it doesn't concern."

If you're not going to sing the song in it's native language, why bother? The words and tune were crafted together in Gaeilge, not in English, and more is lost than just the 'meaning' of the words when it is performed in English. If you're going to perform this song in front of an English-speaking audience, just give a general explanation of the background and meaning or 'feel' of the song and sing it in Irish. Give the people some credit – they'll be able to 'get' the song without knowing what every single word means.

Le meas, Áine


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 02:41 PM

didn't mean to give a wrong impression - i was trying to have fun with the words, is all :-)

a.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Áine
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 03:34 PM

A Mhían,

Sorry -- let me climb down from my soapbox (or should that be my 'high horse') and apologize. Since you've been to my page, you probably noticed that I'm a member of the Conradh na Gaeilge. It's true what they say -- we're the 'serious' ones. Sometimes I let my passion take over my common sense. Please accept my apology. Le meas, Áine


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 03:47 PM

Aine - To each his own - I don't agree that songs shouldn't be translated, but I'll allow that it's a valid point of view. Translation could be considered analagous to songs becoming "elevator music". I'm a member of Conradh na Gaeilge too, and I do sometimes sing entire songs in gaelic, after painstakingly checking the pronounciation with a native speaker, but knowing even then that I'm probably mangling it. However, I think a general audience loses interest after the third verse of a language they don't understand, so I look for good translations and I alternate gaelic and English verses. Works for me, works for the listeners, keeps the folk music alive in some form. I think the world needs both purists and improvisers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Mían
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 06:01 PM

A Áine,a dheirfiúr bheag, ní mór an rud is é sin.

My personal view is that sean nós is the most beautiful singing in the world (and possible elsewhere, i do tend to think of angels when i hear some of the singers' voices). And so far I find myself rather indifferent to translated renditions. For example, there is a perfectly fine version of Droimeann Donn Dilis that has alternating Irish & English verses and when i hear it i feel... um. ? er. well, i wish the whole thing could be in Irish.

I do like to make translation studies of my own for the beauty of understanding as much about the song as I can. I suppose some (including my poor husband) would think i get carried away because i get surrounded with piles of dictionaries and history books and maps. Then, when i feel i have understood as much as i can, i calligraph the song in Irish only into a little songbook i am making and i retire the word studies into archives. how's that for ritual? (big grin). (don't ask about the feasting that accompanies such events, hee hee)

mían


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ó cad é sin don té sin
From: Áine
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 09:53 AM

A Mhían, a chara chóir,

Thanks for the support! Of course we should translate the songs to better understand them; however, I still stand by my opinion of performing them in English. If the Irish language is to survive into the next century, we should promote the use of it and not make it easier on ourselves by substituting English instead. In my experience, the exposure to songs in Irish has inspired many folks to explore the language and take classes to learn it. When I've asked beginning students in my classes what made them want to learn Irish, several usually respond with a version of "I wanted to know what they were singing about."

I do agree with Susan-Marie that it can become boring for an English-speaking audience to listen to several songs in Irish in one performance (unless that's what they came for in the first place). I think her idea of alternating English and Irish in a song is a good one for a general audience; however, it goes against my 'purist' grain. I still think it better to cut a few verses off a long song, to give a general description of the song, and to sing it entirely in Irish.

Case in point -- Would a performance of La Boheme or Madame Butterfly be as enjoyable if it were done in English? Have you ever heard an opera in English? It sounds ridiculous – Italian is one of the most 'musical' languages in the world and the opera world has never seen the need to translate these wonderful works of art into English. A little description in the program and the performance is appreciated and understood in its native tongue.

A Mhían, I applaud your arduous study and it's nice to know that someone is driving their spouse crazy with books, etc. all over the place. We should swap recipes for our favorite 'study bash'!! Maith thú a chailín!

Slán, Áine


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O cad e sin don te sin
From: GUEST,Diarmuid
Date: 09 May 11 - 12:51 PM

I am not a member of Connradh na Gaeilge and I do object to what one poet described as (and ironically I translate) as "our culture being looted". Our culture is being mined and looted for its jewels and if people want to sing them these songs they should learn to sing them in Irish. Many classic songs from many languages are sung to international audiences in the original without protest. But this is not just a matter of translation from the original, but of translation from the original which is under threat into the very language that is threatening it.
As for adding some verses in English that's fine but it doesn't work for all songs. I sing one verse in English at the end of Sliabh na mBan. It is true that many people who don't understand Irish lack the patience to hear the song through in Irish -- so why sing it to them? They will miss out on it -- their loss. I suspect that singers who are intent on singing translations do it for their own reasons that have fundamentally nothing to do with our culture, the song's message or even the audience.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O cad e sin don te sin
From: RunrigFan
Date: 09 May 11 - 03:31 PM

Cassidys

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/cassidys/cad.htm

Chuaigh mé 'un aonaigh is dhíol mé mo bhó
Ar chúig phunta airgid is ar ghiní bhuí óir
Má ólaim an t-airgead 's má bhronnaim an t-ór
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

I went to the fair and I sold my cow
For five pounds in silver and a guinea in gold
Should I drink all the money and hand out the gold
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Má théim go coill chraobhach ag piocadh sméara nó cnó
'Baint úllaí de ghéaga nó 'bhuachailleacht bó
Má shíním seal uaire faoi chrann ag déanamh só
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

I could go to the woods and pluck berries or nuts
And apples from branches, even herding the cows
Should I lie 'neath the trees for some hours in repose
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Má théimse chuig airneál is rince is spórt
Chuig aonach is rásí's gach cruinniú den tsórt
Má chím daoine súgach 's má bhím súgach leo
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

I'd visit the neighbors for dancing and fun
Markets, the races, and gatherings galore
If I see merry people then merry we'll be
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Deir daoine go bhfuil mé gan rath is gan dóigh
Gan earra gan éadáil, gan bólacht ná stór
Má tá mise sásta 'bheith' mo chónaí i gcró
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

They say I'm a waster and down on my luck
No goods or fine clothing, no stock or no store
Should I live in a stable contented and free
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Tá aithne agam ar chailín deas cheasta is cóir
A píob mar an eala 's a leacain mar rós
Má bhíonn sí is mise un inid faoí sheol
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

I know this girl, she's kind and she's fair
Her neck like the swan and her cheek like the rose
Should we set out together for a far-distant shore
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Chuaigh mé 'un aonaigh is dhíol mé mo bhó
Ar chúig phunta airgid is ar ghiní bhuí óir
Má ólaim an t-airgead 's má bhronnaim an t-ór
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?

I went to the fair and I sold my cow
For five pounds in silver and a guinea in gold
Should I drink all the money and hand out the gold
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Má ólaim an t-airgead 's má bhronnaim an t-ór
Ó cad é sin don té sin nach mbaineann sin dó?x2

Should I drink all the money and hand out the gold
It's nobody's business, let them leave me alone

Órla's version

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/fallon/cad.htm

Clannad's version

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/caide.htm

Altan's version

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/altan/caide.htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O cad e sin don te sin
From: GUEST,InquisitiveFrog
Date: 02 May 13 - 08:06 AM

Years ago I discovered the Clannad version of this song (still my favorite to this day) and felt the urge to know what the lyrics said.
So I grabbed an Irish-English dictionary and hammered out a translation that was somewhat patchy. Yet, as I later learned on finding a proper English translation on the internet, I wasn't that much off—I had got it 90% right. Not bad considering I am 110% clueless in Gaelic and English isn't my first language either (French born and bred).
I'm not posting this to blow my own trumpets, just to make this point : anyone curious and respectful of other cultures and languages can find their way through a foreign song with a little effort.
I was rewarded with getting to sing along or hum the song to myself and still know what it says, & I agree that it sounds better in Irish.
That is not to say you can't adapt a given song in another language; in fact I've heard some French songs that sounded awesome in Spanish, for instance; though it had a lot to do with the singer's own talent. But if one is to translate a song, they really should make sure they fully understand what it's all about in its original version.

Slán agaibh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: O cad e sin don te sin
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Oct 13 - 04:13 PM

I realize it would be tough to do this, but can anyone put the pronunciation of each word next to the original lyrics? I would love to learn this song in the original celtic but the words obviously are pronounced different than they are spelled. It would be a great help, thanks!


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