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Tech: Resetting cookie

The Maverick 11 Aug 11 - 03:54 AM
Newport Boy 11 Aug 11 - 05:18 AM
GUEST,Noreen 11 Aug 11 - 05:23 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 11 - 12:35 AM
JohnInKansas 12 Aug 11 - 03:28 AM
GUEST,suegorgeous 12 Aug 11 - 05:16 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 11 - 05:42 AM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 08:32 AM
JohnInKansas 12 Aug 11 - 09:58 AM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 12:14 PM
GUEST,suegorgeous 12 Aug 11 - 03:36 PM
catspaw49 12 Aug 11 - 03:57 PM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 03:57 PM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 11 - 04:51 PM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 05:01 PM
JohnInKansas 12 Aug 11 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 07:05 PM
GUEST,Jon 12 Aug 11 - 07:08 PM
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Subject: Resetting cookie
From: The Maverick
Date: 11 Aug 11 - 03:54 AM

Does everyonokie every day or is it just me?e have to rest their co


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: Newport Boy
Date: 11 Aug 11 - 05:18 AM

With a keyboard like that, I'm not surprised!!

No - I've not reset my cookie since I used this computer.

Phil


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Noreen
Date: 11 Aug 11 - 05:23 AM

Check your settings, maverick- you may be set not to allow cookies.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 12:35 AM

Hi, Maverick-
If you need to reset your cookie, it's almost always due to something on your own computer - a corrupted cookie, perhaps; or security settings that are too stiff. Cookies often disappear when you clear your browser cache - and I find I need to do that once a week or so so my browsers will run scripts like I have in Hotmail.
If you've forgotten your user name or password, contact me, joe@mudcat.org.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 03:28 AM

With some browsers, in some versions, if you don't show mudcat.org as a "trusted site" your browser will save a cookie only as a "temporary" one, and it will go away, usually when you shut down the browser.

Some browsers can also be set to "clear history" when you close the browser. "Advanced users" learn how to clear what's necessary only when they've visited embarassing places, but it could be a default setting for some who "don't care who knows."

A few anti-malware programs may delete cookies - and "other stuff" - in unknown and unpredictable ways. Most such have settings that let you control them, but there are no consistent methods that are generally applicable.

If you use a "Disk Cleanup," especially via some add-on junkware, you may lose cookies unexpectedly.

The Disk Cleanup in Windows Operating Systems should show you a list of objects to be deleted so that you can check or uncheck individual kinds of things for deletion. If you've checked "cookies" (intentionally or inadvertently) the program will continue deleting them on subsequent runs, until you change the check mark.

A "Disk Cleanup" shortcut in the Tools for some IE versions doesn't pause to let you check things and may give unpredictable results. Recent IE versions don't delete cookies from "trusted sites" but that may vary depending on the version used. Other browsers might require you to specify what to do.

Closing IE and using the Cleanup you get by right-clicking your System Drive (usually C:\) in Windows Explorer, clicking Properties, and then the button on the General tab is recommended, since no cleanup utility can delete any open file. Running the cleanup while IE is open can leave trash that IE was still using, although usually not much.

John


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,suegorgeous
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 05:16 AM

I constantly get a message that asks me if I want to continue running scripts. Sorry if it's obvious, but what are scripts? (in plain English please!) :)

thanks.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 05:42 AM

I don't know enough to give you a complete answer, Sue; but one way of understanding it would be to say that scripts are the coding that allow Web pages to DO something, rather than simply displaying information. That's a pretty simplified answer. It will be interesting to see what others say.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 08:32 AM

I think that type of message can be displayed when there is an error in a client side script (a computer program that is run by your web browser) such as JavaScript on the web page.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 09:58 AM

The "scripts" referred to in the warnings are almost always "Java" scripts. There are other kinds, and Windows programs generally have a scripting utility built-in or easily added that they call "Power Shell" that Microsoft claims is "a replacement for Java but better than anything."

A problem with "scripts" is that they can "tell your computer" to do just about anything, and as a result they've been frequent carriers of "malicious instructions." (Redirects to fake malicious sites have been a common use.) They fall in the general classification of "Add Ons" and you may find a whole list of "Add Ons" somewhere in your browser where you can turn them on or off, some can be deleted, and you can put in others that you "get somewhere." (In IE, Tools|Internet Options|Programs tab|Manage Add-ons button.)

Recent versions of IE have added increasingly strict control of scripts, and are likely to reject any that aren't confirmed safe. People who write valid scripts can submit them to Mickey for "proofing" and have them "certified," and they'll almost always be accepted and will work just fine. MOST scripts that carry an embedded "certificate of origin" that identifies who made them are fairly likely to be accepted by IE, unless they contain specific "instructions" frequently used in malware. Nearly all scripts that have no identification for who wrote and/or distrubutes them probably will be rejected, with default browser settings.

You may be able to "lower the security level" a step and get a few more scripts in past the new filters, but you need to be careful about how casual you get.

Until fairly recently, Java was about the only script form seen much on the web. Microsoft provided a Java version you could download from their update site, or you could "go to the source" and get "plain vanilla Java" from Sun Microsystems (who owned the copyright).

Obviously, the increasing rejection of "scripts" - especially in Microsoft products - has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO with Sun having won their copyright suit and forced Microsoft to cease distribution any version of Java.

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

NOTHING
AT ALL.

I suppose.

I haven't found any particularly useful "work arounds" for rejected scripts, but a properly constructed web page should load okay without the add-on (script) but may be missing things like linked-in ads (i.e BULLSHIT you probably don't care about anyway). Some sites have been using scripts recently to "call up" remotely stored videos and open and start your video viewer (or their own) and in this case you may be unable to view the "movies." While the script failure doesn't, in itself, tell you that the site is dangerous, it should, at least sometimes, tell you that whoever wrote the script wasn't proud enough of his/her work to put a name on it.

Until a little more is known about what the flap is about, you're best option probably is to accept whatever your browser recommends. The "OK" button probably should be named the "WHATEVER - WHO CARES" button but it's the one you're going to want to use unless you're willing to search out what's being blocked in each individual case. Most times it's not going to be worth a quibble.

John


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 12:14 PM

I think JavaScript rather than Java, John.

I don't know anything about PowerShell but Microsoft have had 2 client side scripting languages used in Web pages that I can think of. JScript (which I think is very similar to JavaScript) and VBScript.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,suegorgeous
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 03:36 PM

*confuddled* (though your simplicity appreciated, Joe!)

It's probably best I actually get a non-jargon-speaking tekky round to talk it through and ask questions.

But why am I suddenly getting these "script" messages, when I never used to get any at all? (it might be since I updated to a newer version of IE - could this have a bearing?).

thanks to all for your efforts! :)


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: catspaw49
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 03:57 PM

Yeah it could........but y'all messed up somewhere or another.(;<))


Spaw


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 03:57 PM

Seems it might have something to do with script debugger settings in IE. Try tools/internet options/advanced tab and see if you can switch something off there.

Firebug has not found any errors for me on the Mudcat pages I've tried though.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 04:51 PM

John and Jon, do you have any idea why Internet Explorer 9 won't print for me? Every time I try to print, I get a message saying "an error occurred in the script on this page." I see that script debugging is turned off on my browser, which is apparently the default setting.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 05:01 PM

I'd have to go through Google searches...

One thing I suppose you could try is turning debugging on just in case it produces an error message that is understandable or might narrow a search for help.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 06:58 PM

For those mystified by the "error" in my previous post, the hint is that text changes colors when you highlight it.

I haven't seen any of the script blocking warnings on mudcat.

In the simplest terms I can think of, a "script" is a list of instructions that tells your computer to do something.

Java is a "language" and a JavaScript is a list of instructions in that language.

VB (Visual Basic) is another language in which scripts can be written.

Power Shell is the current name for Microsoft's latest "Java-like" language, and scripts can be written in that language as well.

Less simple:

In the context of what a script is, and what it does, html source coding is a script, as is a DOS batch file. Nobody refers to these as scripts since they're used only with programs where they're universally understood, and they're already well-known by more specific names.

Scripts are used quite frequently on servers, but since the server will always be equipped with any language implementations necessary for the script to be "executed" on the server a "server-side" script should never produce a script blocking warning in your browser.

A "script" can be embedded in the html sent to your browser, and your browser "reads the instructions" in both the html and the "script" in order to "print the page" on your monitor. If the "script" is in a language that your browser doesn't automatically understand, a "browser add-in" may be needed before the browser can follow its instructions.

If the browser can't read the "script" because there's an error in the script or because the browser doesn't have the necessary add-in, the script may be blocked. This means only that the "actions requested by that script" aren't going to happen in your browser, so some part of the intended page will be "missing." You can "continue running scripts on this page" if you like, since another script that doesn't have errors might come through, or IE at least lets you just "ignore all scripts" on the page.

Where it gets messy:

Microsoft provides a number of "approved add-ins" for IE that are installed along with the Operating System. You can turn these on or off, but you can't delete them.

You can add other add-ins that you get from elsewhere, and any that you add can be turned on, turned off, or deleted.

Until quite recently, you could get the Java add-in directly from Microsoft, under what Microsoft claimed was "an agreement" with Sun Microsystems.

Microsoft was sued by Sun Microsystems, and the suit was continued more aggressively after Sun was sold to Oracle. Microsoft was recently fined (IIRC 200 million dollars) for "copyright violations" and was ordered to cease distributing the Java/JavaScript add-in. You cannot get the Java add-in from Microsoft now. I haven't determined whether Microsoft has removed existing ones that they previously delivered, but they could have done so as part of a recent update(?).

There are numerous other add-ins that may cause problems with your browser, but Java and JavaScript are widely used and very powerful so they can be used to provide useful features, but can also be used maliciously to cause a lot of damage.

Malicious scripts alone are dangerous enough, but it's also possible for an "altered add-in" to enable instructions that "clean Java" wouldn't recognize. The malevalent instructions could be in "any language," possibly one that only the programmer who made the alterations to the add-in knows, making it extremely difficult for malware filters to recognize and block the malicious intent.

Since Microsoft is prohibited from giving you a Java/JavaScript add-in that they have verified, and there are lots of other places where you can get "lookslike Java add-ins" with unknown "features," IE, and to a limited extent other browsers, have "tightened the rules" on add-ins.

One specific change recently made in IE, with default security level settings, is rejection of nearly any add-in that lacks a "digital signature" clearly indicating who wrote and distributed it. The digital signature also is (theoretically) invalidated by any alteration made after the signature is attached.

In some cases, IE still allows you to override the browser recommendation to block adding an add-in, but in other cases it's - - at least very difficult. It appears that Microsoft has a list of some "trusted distributors" who are allowed, at least to some extent, to ignore the digital signature requirement(?).

The most recent Java add-in that I downloaded from Sun was "unsigned." It installed, and apparently runs some JavaScripts but rejects others, presumedly because they're "malformed" in some way.

(I've had no problems with any of the "scripts" embeded in html at mudcat.)

John


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 07:05 PM

Java is a "language" and a JavaScript is a list of instructions in that language.

I'm sorry John but Java and JavaScript are different languages. They are not connected.


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Subject: RE: Resetting cookie
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 12 Aug 11 - 07:08 PM

An extract from my second link on the naming of JavaScript.

The change of name from LiveScript to JavaScript roughly coincided with Netscape adding support for Java technology in its Netscape Navigator web browser. The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized by many as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new web-programming language.


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