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Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare

Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:11 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:18 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:21 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:23 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:30 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:33 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:34 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:37 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:39 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:40 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 11 - 11:44 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Aug 11 - 12:24 AM
Chris in Portland 17 Aug 11 - 11:01 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Aug 11 - 10:44 PM
Jim Dixon 19 Aug 11 - 01:23 PM
Jim Dixon 19 Aug 11 - 02:28 PM
Jim Dixon 19 Aug 11 - 05:28 PM
Jim Dixon 19 Aug 11 - 06:58 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Aug 11 - 12:54 AM
Jim Dixon 20 Aug 11 - 08:15 PM
Jim Dixon 21 Aug 11 - 07:33 AM
Chris in Portland 21 Aug 11 - 11:29 AM
Jim Dixon 21 Aug 11 - 03:24 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Aug 11 - 12:29 AM
Jim Dixon 22 Aug 11 - 05:15 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Aug 11 - 07:22 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Aug 11 - 11:37 AM
Jim Dixon 23 Aug 11 - 12:40 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Aug 11 - 09:27 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Aug 11 - 11:55 PM
Jim Dixon 24 Aug 11 - 12:26 AM
Jim Dixon 24 Aug 11 - 08:20 AM
Jim Dixon 29 Aug 11 - 08:18 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 07:15 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 08:22 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 01:59 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 07:44 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 11 - 10:00 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 10:49 AM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 03:44 PM
Artful Codger 31 Aug 11 - 06:38 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 11 - 11:13 PM
Artful Codger 01 Sep 11 - 01:37 AM
Artful Codger 01 Sep 11 - 02:36 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 11 - 08:04 AM
Jim Dixon 02 Sep 11 - 09:51 AM
Artful Codger 02 Sep 11 - 06:26 PM
Jim Dixon 06 Sep 11 - 06:15 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 12:49 AM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 06:18 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 11 - 10:08 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM
Jim Dixon 08 Sep 11 - 11:12 AM
Artful Codger 08 Sep 11 - 11:04 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 01:01 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 03:11 PM
Artful Codger 14 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Sep 11 - 06:59 PM
Artful Codger 14 Sep 11 - 08:35 PM
Artful Codger 01 Jul 14 - 02:15 AM
Jim Dixon 02 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 12:38 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 07:35 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 14 - 08:17 AM
GUEST 17 Oct 15 - 04:03 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: AS A PORCUPINE PINES FOR ITS PORK
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:11 PM

Here's how I spent some of my spare time while Mudcat was down: I transcribed songs by some of my favorite singers.

The songs I plan to post today all came from The Internet Archive:

Spoken patter is in italics.

I have indicated with a dash where there is a change of speaker in the patter, but I have not done so in the singing parts, although Jones and Hare often sing alternate lines. In fact their arrangement often turns a song into a dialog, even when it was written as a monolog, so to speak. Thus they often change pronouns from "I" to "you" or "we." I trust that, if you want to sing these songs, you can work out the appropriate pronoun for yourself.


AS A PORCUPINE PINES FOR ITS PORK (THAT'S HOW I PINE FOR YOU)
Words by Art Walsh. Music by A Paganucci.
New York: Joe Morris Music Co., ©1925.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) accompanied by Dave Kaplan on piano.

—Say, Bill, shall we sing that crazy porcupine song?
—Yes, Ernest. I just feel crazy enough to sing it.
—Then we'll both be crazy. All right, Dave.


1. Porcupines are all full of quills.
Kiss them and you're sure to get thrills.
Weeping willows like to weep,
Just like I weep for you.
As a porcupine pines for its pork,
That's how I pine for you.
As a grasshopper hops on the grass,
I'll hop right after you.
As an eggplant plants its egg,
I'll plant myself near you.
Not a woodchuck would chuck wood
As I would chuck my love at you.

—Say, Bill, what's the difference between a rich man and a dog's tail?
—A dog's tail keeps a-waggin', and a rich man keeps an automobile!


2. Alligators come through the gate,
But goodbye, leg, if you get away late.
Lollies always like to pop.
I'll pop the question too.
As a porcupine pines for its pork,
That's how I pine for you.
As a woodpecker pecks at the wood,
I'll always peck at you.
As a Pekinese peeks at the knees,
I'll always peek at you.
All the oil cans can their oil,
But I can tie the can to you.

—Say, Bill, we've got a new dog down at my house.
—What's his name, Ernie?
—Why, Ginger.
—Does Ginger bite?
—No, Ginger snaps!


3. As a butterfly flies at the butter,
I'll fly right after you.
As a mouse trap traps the mouse,
That's just how I'll trap you.
As the lipstick sticks to the lip,
I'll always stick to you.
As the earring rings the ear,
I'm going to put a ring on you.

—Tell me, Ernest, how do you produce sawdust?
—Produce sawdust? Why, uh, let me see, uh—
—Come, come! Use your head!
—Oh, Will!


4. If they find the guys who wrote this song,
They'll not be here for long.
As the sharpshooter likes to shoot,
We'll shoot those crazy goofs.
Every nutcracker has its nuts,
And nuts from trees do fall,
But of all the nuts and crazy mutts,
They are the worst of all!

—Bill, what do cannibals do with the heads of their victims?
—I guess they make noodle soup out of them, Ernie!


5. If we don't sing another chorus,
We hope you'll still be for us.
We bought dictionaries by the score,
But we can't find no more.
Just buy yourself a ukulele,
And while you're strumming gaily,
Sing your own words to this crazy song.
They're all right if they're wrong.


[The following verses come from a different and longer recording (#2 at the Internet Archive page) with an orchestra accompaniment, and no patter.]

3b. As the penholder holds the pen,
That's just how I'll hold you.
As the soupspoon spoons with the soup,
That's how I'll spoon with you.
As the Sunkist kissed the sun,
I'll keep on kissing you.
As the lemon squeezer squeezes lemons,
That's just how I'll squeeze you.

3c. Every old rubber tire tires,
But I'll not tire of you.
As the fruit punch punches the fruit,
That's just how I'll punch you.
As the fish-hook hooks the fish,
Believe me, I'll hook you.
As Mary Pickford picks a Ford,
That's just how I picked you.

3d. As the coal heaver heaves his coal,
I'll heave my love at you.
As the earache aches for the ear,
My poor heart aches for you.
As the broomstick sticks to the broom,
I'll always stick to you.
As the bull's-eye eyes the bull,
I'm going to keep an eye on you.


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Subject: Lyr Add: COLLEGIATE (Moe Jaffe/Nat Bonx)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:18 PM

COLLEGIATE
Words and music by Moe Jaffe and Nat Bonx.
New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co. Inc., ©1925.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Say, Bill, d'ja notice that I had my college colors on today?
—No I didn't notice, Ernest. What are your college colors?
—Why, Black and White!* Ah! You can't wear your college colors, can you?
—No, I can't, but I have some.
—Tell the people what they are.
—Orange and gin!


Valentino's famous on the movie screens,
And Mister Heinz is known because of pork and beans.
Don't think me and the boyfriend envy either one.
They've got dough, but, oh, ain't we got fun?

Collegiate, collegiate, yes we are collegiate.
Nothing intermejate, no, ma'am.
Trousers baggy and our clothes are raggy,
But we're rough and ready, yea!
Garters are the things we never wear,
And we haven't any use for red-hot flannels.
Very, very seldom in a hurry,
Never, ever worry.
We're collegiate, rah, rah, rah!

Douglas Fairbanks picked a Pickford for a wife,
And he should worry if the peas roll off his knife.
What's one girl in a million when you're in our shoes?
We've got lots and lots and lots to choose.

Alpha (alpha), beta (beta), delta, gamma, theta,
Lambda, chi, omega, my gal!
Le' me (le' me), gi' me (gi' me), one-a half a dollar.
Wear a Arrow collar, no!
Sigma (sigma), kappa (kappa), tap a half a keg.
That's the Greek for all the lodges we belong to.
Soccer, soaker, dealt a hand o' poker.
Eats at ev'ry smoker.
We're collegiate, rah, rah, rah!

—Say, Bill, give 'em your college yell.
—Hurrah for Harvard! Hurrah for Yale! We gained our knowledge through the mail! Correspondence!


Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Virginia,
Dartmouth, Pennsylvania, milkshake!
Salami, pastrami, baloney, and spumoni,
Chow Mein mit spaghetti, yea!
Bryn Mawr (Bryn Mawr), Vassar (Vassar), chocolate frappe, wow!
These are all the colleges that we belong to.
Diet varies maraschino cherries,
S.O.S. and berries.
We're collegiate, rah, rah, rah!

[* Apparently a reference to a brand of Scotch whiskey.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: CUT YOURSELF A PIECE OF CAKE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:21 PM

CUT YOURSELF A PIECE OF CAKE (AND MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME)
Words and music by Billy James
New York: Leo. Feist, Inc., ©1923.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

My friend Jonesie he got married just the other night.
I hear he's a man who has an awful appetite.
Well, his wife went to cooking school but only learned to bake.
He must kick about his meals. She says, "John, for goodness' sake,
Just cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.
I'm sorry that I can't cook steak, but cake is so high-tone.
You'll get corns and bunions
From eating Spanish onions,
So cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home."

Once a week at Jonesie's house the poker players meet.
After playing cards I'll bet that they all want to eat.
"One more deal and then we'll eat." they hear his wifie say.
They expect a lovely spread but almost pass away
When she says, "Cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.
I'm sorry that I can't cook steak, but cake is so high-tone.
Ev'ry social leader
Today is a cake-eater,
So cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.

"In summer you should diet,
So start in now and try it.
Just cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.

Jones came home the other night and said, "I've lost my job.
He said he couldn't pay the rent unless some bank he'd rob.
The landlord said he'd call that night because the rent was due.
Jonesie's wife said, "I'll fix him!" She knew what to do.
She told him, "Cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.
I'm sorry that I can't cook steak, but cake is so high-tone.
You swore by stars above, dear,
That you could live on love, dear,
So cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.

"From eating fried calf's liver,
A man jumped in the river,
So cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home.
There's apple cake and orange cake
And angel cake and choc'late cake
And raisin cake and nutty cake,
So cut yourself a piece of cake and make yourself at home."


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Subject: Lyr Add: DOWN WHERE THE SOUTH BEGINS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:23 PM

DOWN WHERE THE SOUTH BEGINS
Words by Sam M. Lewis and Joe Young; music by Russel Robinson.
New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder Co., ©1924.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

1. I'm going to take you home with me.
How are we gonna get there?
Back home is where we ought to be.
Where will we dig up the fare?
Stop kidding! I'm so blue and you're asking me riddles.
Do you think you'll get home on talk?
I'll have you meet my ma and pa.
Say, I just hate to walk.

CHORUS: It's the end of roaming.
I'm home-sweet-homing
Down where the south begins.
It's the end of yearning
'Cause I'm returning
Down where the south begins.
Boy, oh, boy, your ... were a-smiling
When you went away.
Instead of joy, my troubles kept a-piling
More and more each day.
Who do you always want to see?
Where do you always want to be
When you're all alone?
Who do you keep remembering?
Why do I always want to sing,
"There's no place like home"?
There's a hush-a-bye-ing
Old lady crying
To wash away your sins.
It's the end of worryin',
No more hurryin',
Down where the south begins.

2. Why do we think the world is gay
Further and further away?
And why do we always long to stray
Further and further away?
When the short little miles become longer.
Then you think of that last goodbye.
I've known a million homesick pains.
That's just why I sigh: CHORUS TWICE

[There is another song with the same title:

DOWN WHERE THE SOUTH BEGINS
Words by Gus Kahn; music by Walter Donaldson.
New York: Donaldson, Douglas & Gumble Inc., ©1932.

First line of verse: I'm gettin' weary, I'm gettin' cold.
First line of chorus: You'll find the smiles a little pearlier.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: GID AP, GARIBALDI
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:30 PM

GID AP, GARIBALDI (1927)
Words by Howard Johnson and Billy Moll; music by Harry Warren.
New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co., ©1927.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Gid-ap-a, Garibaldi! Nice stromberries, pinanos, peenappleses. Whoa, Garibaldi! What you want, lady?
—You got a nice-a fresh-a veg'tabells?
—I got-a nice-a radicchio, a cappucia, a spinaci, carroote. What do you want, lady?

—I don't care for something today.

Tony has a pony what you call-a nice-a the horse.
With a wagon he would sell the vegetables, o' course.
Now Garibaldi, he's the name of Tony's nice-a the pony.
Tony drove him all around in Little Italy,
And when the lady she's-a refuse to buy,
Tony he's-a get mad and start to cry:

—What's the matter, Mariuch?
—I no like-a you cabuche.
—No? —No. —Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
What's the matter, Antoinette?
—I no like-a you spaghetti
—No? —No. —Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
Up-a-town, down-a-town, he's-a go all day,
And, Sacramento! He give-a the stuff away!
—What's the matter Isabelle?
—How's you garlic? She's-a smell?
—Oh! Gid-ap, Garibaldi.

Tony knew the first-a name of every lady he'd meet.
He would yell at all o' them as he's-a go down the street,
And when they'd poke-a fun at Garibaldi, Tony said,
"Don'-a holler 'Oats!' to him or else he's drop-a dead."
And when the veg'tabells commence to rot
Tony cried this job is good for naught.

—What's the matter, Josephine?
—I no like-a the string-a-bean.
—No? —No. —Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
What's the matter, Rosemarie?
—I no like-a the green-a peas.
—No? —No. —Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
One day I saw-a Marianna
Squeeze-a big bunch o' bananas.
Tony look an' holler, "Please,
Try coconuts to squeeze."
—What's the matter Marguerite?
—I no like-a your stuff to eat.
—Whoa! Gid-ap, Garibaldi.

Oh, oh, oh,
The business is-a slow.
La-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.
La-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.
Hey, hey, hey,
Ev'rybody walk away.
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
If you no like-a the stromberry, the gooseberry, the blackberry,
If you no like-a no berry, I give you the raspberry!

—What's the matter, Rosabelle?
My peenapple she's-a swell.
No? Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
What's the matter, Carmentine?
Try-a the lemon. She's-a sweet.
No? Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
And when the pony's ribs they stick out from-a the side,
They cry, "Hey, Tony, give-a the horse a nice-a big-a ride!"
Then-a Tony he's-a called
"I sell-a the horse but he's-a sold."
No? Gid-ap, Garibaldi.
Whoa! Stop! Back! Hop! Hey, wop!* What do you say?
No? Gid-ap, Garibaldi.


[I assume the horse was named after Giuseppe Garibaldi, and the name was correctly spelled on the record, but misspelled by whoever posted the MP3 at the Internet Archive.

[* At least, that's what I think I hear. The word "wop" would be unacceptable by today's standards.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: HOKEY POKEY DIDDLE DEE RUM
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:33 PM

HOKEY POKEY DIDDLE DEE RUM
Words & music by Cliff Hess and Wendell Hall.
Chicago: Forster Music Pub., ©1925
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1926.

Hokey pokey diddle dee rum.
Derby, that's where we came from.
It's a town way down in Tennessee.
Some folks think it's mighty slow.
Still it has its push and go,
And it's plenty fast enough for me.

There was a man in Derby town as strong as any ox.
They say the reason was because he'd never change his—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, he never changed his mind.
He said, "I'm strong because I'm always drinking pickle brine."

The folks in Derby have their freedom, though it may sound queer.
A man can step in anywhere and get a glass of—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, perhaps you think I lie,
But every man in Derby has a twinkle in his eye.

We have a dentist in our town for whom I'd like to vouch.
When he extracts your tooth, why, all you do is holler—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, which proves what I have said:
The only painless dentist is a dentist who is dead.

I kicked a little dog one day; you should have heard him wail.
Where did I kick him, sir, you say? Oh, thereby hangs a—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, oh, thereby hangs a tale.
I kicked him without conscience and I kicked him without fail.

Hokey pokey diddle dee rum.
As a town that makes things hum,
Derby takes the cookie every time.
Talk about your money's worth!
There's no other place on earth
You can have as much fun on a dime.

The circus came to Derby and I saw the old giraffe,
And when I saw the monkeys, why, it really made me—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, I laughed, I tell you, friend,
To see the dog-gone elephant with a tail upon each end.

We have a dog named Michael and he loves to bark at night,
But I am not afraid because a barking dog won't—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, I mean he wouldn't snap.
Why, every time he wags his tail, he gives himself a slap.

—Say, Bill, you know one thing—it appears to me that this song has a lot of words to it.
—I don't mind that, Ernie.
—No?
—Say Ernie, do you know I can sing two different voices, tenor and bass?
—Oh, Bill, you can't sing bass.
—Yes, I can sing bass, any time I want to. Any time I want to! In fact, do you want to hear me sing?
—Yeah, go ahead, Bill.
—I don't want to, Ernie.
—Well, let's sing these other thousand choruses.
—All right.


In Derby our police force says he never goes to bed,
So there's no fear of bandits hitting you upon the—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, which means in accents wild,
When you are held up, all you yell is "Fireman, save my child!"

There was a hen in Derby town that had a wooden leg.
One day we fed her sawdust and she laid a wooden—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, and so is your old man.
I never eat tomatoes till I first remove the can.

The boy stood on the burning deck when all but he had fled.
A seagull laid a hard-boiled egg and dropped it on his—
Hokey pokey diddle dee rum, with whiffletrees and sand.
Oh, Mama, Johnny started singing "Ain't the gravy grand!"


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Subject: Lyr Add: I CAN'T SLEEP IN THE MOVIES ANY MORE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:34 PM

I CAN'T SLEEP IN THE MOVIES ANY MORE
Words and music by Arthur Fields, Fred Hall, and Bert Van Cleve.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1929.

—Hey, Bill, what's the idea of squinting your eyes like you're doing?
—Well, I've had a lot of trouble with my eyes lately.
—Had trouble with them?
—Yes.
—Well, you'd have more trouble without them, wouldn't you?
—Oh ho, yes I would.
—You know, my eyes have been troubling me.
—Is that so?
—I blame it on moving pictures. You know, movies hurt my eyes.
—Movies used to hurt my eyes, but now they hurt my ears.
—You know, they used to say that movie actresses were dumb.
—Yeah, now I wish they were, Ernie.


VERSE 1: Folks all rave about the good old days, they do,
And we both agree with them, we're telling you.
We used to love the good old picture show
The way we used to see them years ago.
Then the silent drama held its sway okay.
Now they squeak and squawk; that's why we say:

CHORUS 1: I'm so sad and I'm so blue,
And I'm feeling that way, too.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
When the star with baby face
Shouts out in a voice that's bass,
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
Our dozing days are ended.
No more the organ plays.
To mellow tones it rendered,
We could sleep for days and days.
When our wife becomes a pest,
Now we have no place to rest.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.

VERSE 2: Talkies are a great invention, we agree.
Knocking isn't our intention, no siree.
But if you loved a nap the way we do,
It's ten to one you'd be complaining too.
Now we have to keep awake through twenty reels,
Listening to sneezes, squawks, and squeals.

CHORUS 2: When church scenes are shown today,
They're so real, we start to pray.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
Now the pickaxe we hear pick,
Even hear the crickets crick.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
The sheik is from the ghetto.
I thought he came from Spain.
His voice is high falsetto,
And he sounds like he's in pain.
And a theme song there must be
Just to torture him and me.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.

CHORUS 3: Lions roar; we shake with fright.
We can almost feel them bite.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
Buildings burn upon the street,
And we even feel the heat.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.
When wifie gives her hubby
A wallop on the dome,
They really get so clubby,
It makes us think that we're at home.
If by chance our eyes should close,
Then the villain blows his nose.
We can't sleep in the movies any more.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I LOVE TO DUNK A HUNK OF SPONGE CAKE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:37 PM

I LOVE TO DUNK A HUNK OF SPONGE CAKE
Words and music by Clarence Gaskill.
New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder Co., ©1928
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Hello, Ernie. How are yous today?
—Oh, my goodness! Don't you know you shouldn't say "yous"? You ain't got no education nohow.
—What's that? My father spent thousands of dollars on my education.
—Thousands of dollars?
—Yes, sir.
—It's funny. Money don't go very far these days.
—Is that so?
—If he spent so much money on your education, tell me this: what is bacteria?
—Bacteria?
—Yes.
—That's the back door of a cafeteria. But you know—


I don't go in for botany, astronomy, and such.
No, you're not an art collector, 'cause you don't like that much.
No, but still I have a hobby. Holy mackerel, gosh, gee whiz!
Well, I know I'll never get it, so please tell me what it is.
I love to dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake,
Because it holds more coffee than the rest.
You never dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of crumb cake,
Because the crumbs all linger on your vest.
Now ladyfingers are nice, I know,
But too weak to stand the test.
You love to dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake,
Because it holds more coffee than the rest.

—Oh, I love to dunk.
—Oh, I do too.


I don't go in for painting, 'cause I never held a brush.
No, you're not so fond of music, though you sing just like a thrush.
Well, I'm not a connoisseur when it comes to making love.
You only have one weakness; it's the one you're speaking of.
I love to dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake
Because it holds more coffee than the rest.
You never dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of cheesecake,
And cream puffs make an awful mess.
Now pies and crullers are nice, I know,
But, dunkers, let me suggest:
Why don't you dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake
Because it holds more coffee than the rest.

I have dunked with doughnuts, just like any dunker would,
And I've tried pumpernickel, but I find it not so good.
I've had chocolate éclairs and I think they're very cute.
Ah, but when you bite into them, you don't know which way they'll shoot

"Dunk, dunk, dunky-dunk," says Mary Jane and Doris.
When they start to dunk it sounds like The Anvil Chorus.
Hooray! (Hooray!) Hey, hey! (Hey, hey!)
That's why we're here to say:
We love to dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake
Because it holds more coffee than the rest.
It's nice and yellow and it's often mellow.
We like the way it lingers on our vest.
Apple pie has an awful crust,
And crackers get in my eye.
We love to dunk, dunk, dunk a hunk of sponge cake
Because it holds more coffee than the pie.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I'M GONNA BRING A WATERMELON TO MY GIRL..
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:39 PM

I'M GONNA BRING A WATERMELON TO MY GIRL TONIGHT
Words by Billy Rose; music by Con Conrad.
New York: M. Witmark & Sons, ©1924
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

All the boys love Mary, little Mary Brown,
But she's so contrary when they come around.
Only Tommy Tucker ever gets a kiss.
When the fellows corner him, he tells them this:

When I brought an apple, she let me hold her hand.
When I brought an orange, we kissed to beat the band.
When I brought bananas, she hugged me all her might.
I'm gonna bring a watermelon to my girl tonight.
When I brought an onion, she said it made her cry.
When I brought a grapefruit, it squirted in her eye.
When I brought muskmelons, she said, "I cantaloupe."
I brought her garlic; now I'll find her in the dark, I hope.

Listen, California: watch your orange groves.
Mary's friends, I warn ya, will come out in droves.
They'll attack each orange and they'll stew each prune.
They all dance in fruit stores now to Tommy's tune.

When I bring her oolong, it suits her to a tea.
When I bring her cocoa, she always flirts with me.
When I bring her coffee, we play a kissing game,
And when I bring her my home brew, she tells me her right name.
When I brought a rowboat, she kissed me on the cheek.
When I brought a sailboat, she booked me for a week.
When I brought a tugboat, she sure did treat me right.
I'm going to bring a battleship up to my girl tonight.

When I brought a goldfish, she cuddled up to me.
When I brought a polly, she laughed right out with glee.
When I brought a bulldog, she shouted with delight.
I'm gonna bring an elephant up to my girl tonight.
I brought Thomas Meehan(?); she didn't like his style.
I brought Charlie Chaplin; he didn't make her smile.
Valentino bores her, no matter how he tries,
But she adores Ben Turpin 'cause he has such dreamy eyes.


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Subject: Lyr Add: IT DON'T DO NOTHING BUT RAIN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:40 PM

IT DON'T DO NOTHING BUT RAIN
Words and music by Phil Cook
New York: Triangle Music Pub. Co., Inc., ©1926
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

Weather man, weather man, can't you see we're blue?
Weather man, change your plan; make that sun shine through.
We've heard the folks all croonin' 'bout 'tain't gonna rain no mo',
But ev'ry time that we step out, it starts right in to po'.

We get all dressed in our Sunday best and it don't do nothin' but rain,
Our pants all pressed with our coat and vest, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
It's hard to smile when skies are black
And the rain keeps ticklin' down your back.
Yes, we were born with our rubbers on, 'cause it don't do nothin' but rain.

Want to knock 'em flat in my new straw hat, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
Get a brand new suit so I look real cute, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
It's a darn good suit for the shape it's in,
But the pants ...(?) in my very skin.
They've got wet, I've found; now I can't sit down, 'cause it don't do nothin' but rain.

You can't make love 'neath the skies above when it don't do nothin' but rain.
There ain't no spark in a public park when it don't do nothin' but rain.
It cramps the style; can't do much stuff
When the rain comes oozin' from out o' my cuffs.
How can lovers pet on a bench this wet, and it don't do nothin' but rain?

Take my gal outside for an auto ride, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
Now you can't go far in an open car when it don't do nothin' but rain.
I stopped the car; we talked and talked.
I knew she couldn't get out and walk,
But the sweet young thing carried water wings, and it don't do nothin' but rain.

You take a trip down to Florida, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
You wish that you hadn't gone so far, 'cause it don't do nothin' but rain.
You buy a lot and think you're set.
Later on you find that your lot's all wet,
So you paid for land; it's a swamp you get, 'cause it don't do nothin' but rain.

You go to dine with your baby-mine, and it don't do nothin' but rain.
And then you jaunt to a restaurant, but it don't do nothin' but rain,
And as the waiters round you group,
Then you start in orderin' like a goop,
But you kick yourself when you order soup 'cause it don't do nothin' but—
Rain (rain), rain (rain), rain (rain), rain, don't do nothin' but—
Don't do nothin' but rain.


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Subject: Lyr Add: IT WON'T BE LONG NOW
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:44 PM

IT WON'T BE LONG NOW
Words by Howard Johnson, music by Irving Bibo
New York: Bibo, Bloedon & Lang, ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Did you notice, Bill, that I'd stopped biting my fingernails?
—Yes, I did, Ernie, and they look very good.
—Say, Bill, do you file your nails?
—No, no, Ernie. No, no, I just cut them and throw them away.
—It won't be long now, Bill. You know it appears to me that you feel happy today.
—Very happy.
—Well, bet you I can guess.
—Guess what?
—Come on, Bill. Confess.
—Confess what?
—Why there's a reason why you're feeling gay.
—Certainly there's a reason. I've got no more blues. Just got dandy news.
—Yes.
—But I'm here to say—
—Say it. Say it.


It won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Somebody said we're gonna be wed real soon.
Yes, it won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Life'll be sunny after your honeymoon.
We'll build a bungalow and we'll pay for it on installments.
A dollar a week, you certainly can't go wrong.
No, sir! And if we're able, we'll buy a cradle.
Giddyap, Father Time. It won't be long.

—You know, Bill, time just drags along.
—Yes.
—Everything seems wrong—
—Well—
—When you want a thing that you can't get.
—Yes, it does. But the time just flies, and smiles light up your eyes.
Then you're sure to bet—


It won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Hundreds of years ago someone sang these words.
Yes, it won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Strange as it seems, 'twas used by those ancient birds.
You know, a fellow named Samson loved a girl named Delilah.
His head of hair so long made him very strong,
But Lila craved it, and when she shaved it,
She was the first to sing, "It won't be long."

It won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Soon we'll be finished singing this song to you.
It won't be long now. It won't be long now.
Maybe you'll feel so happy when we are through.
For you may think that this ditty we have just sung is novel,
And we'll be very glad if you like our song,
For then you'll strum it, and then you'll hum it.
Giddyap, Father Time. It won't be long.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Aug 11 - 12:24 AM

Some other songs recorded by The Happiness Boys (Billy Jones & Ernest Hare) that have been posted in other threads:

ALL BY YOURSELF IN THE MOONLIGHT

BARNEY GOOGLE

BRIDGET O'FLYNN (WHERE'VE YA BEEN?)

CRAZY WORDS - CRAZY TUNE

DOES THE SPEARMINT LOSE ITS FLAVOR ON THE BEDPOST OVERNIGHT?

DON'T BRING LULU

A GAY CABALLERO

HARD BOILED ROSE

HENRY'S MADE A LADY OUT OF LIZZIE

HOW DO YOU DO?

HOW'S YOUR FOLKS AND MY FOLKS?

I MISS MY SWISS (MY SWISS MISS MISSES ME)

I WISH I WAS IN PEORIA

IF YOU KNEW SUSIE (LIKE I KNOW SUSIE)

IN THE LITTLE RED SCHOOL HOUSE

IT AIN'T GONNA RAIN NO MORE

MISTER GALLAGHER AND MISTER SHEAN

SINCE HENRY FORD APOLOGIZED TO ME

TEN LITTLE FINGERS AND TEN LITTLE TOES (DOWN IN TENNESSEE)

THAT OLD GANG OF MINE

THE FARMER TOOK ANOTHER LOAD AWAY

YOU TELL HER—I STUTTER


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Chris in Portland
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 11:01 PM

Great job, Jim!!

The reference in the great watermelon song is to Thomas Meighan, whose website refers to his involvement with 2 scandals:
"Meighan was involved in some of the more scandalous moments of silent film history; albeit as a helping hand. On October 25, 1916 in New Jersey he was the sole witness to Jack Pickford and Olive Thomas' secretive wedding.[5]"

"In March 1923, Douglas Gerrad, in need of help bailing his friend Rudolph Valentino out of jail for bigamy, called up a fellow Irishman named Dan O'Brien who happened to be with Meighan at the time. Meighan barely knew Valentino but put up a large chunk of the bail money, and with the help of June Mathis and George Melford, Valentino was eventually freed.[6] "

Perhaps, the Boys knew of this. There is a great dvd bio of Olive Thomas and her sad end - recommended highly.

Chris in Portland


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Subject: Lyr Add: IT'S IN THE BAG (C Tobias, A Sherman)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Aug 11 - 10:44 PM

This time I figured I should identify who sings what.

IT'S IN THE BAG
Words by Charles Tobias, music by Al Sherman, 1927
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

[EH] Say, Bill, I feel immense; I've got confidence.
[BJ] And when you've got confidence, you must feel immense.
[EH] Not a bit in doubt what it's all about.
[BJ] Now, if I mention someone's name— [EH] You're gonna hear me shout:

[EH] It's in the bag; my baby loves me now.
[BJ] It's in the bag; that means you're sure, and how!
[EH] One time she had me worried that there was someone else.
[BJ] Now you don't fear; the coast is clear. [EH] Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
It's in the bag; her mama said okay.
[BJ] And did her pa say, "Don't let it drag"?
I'll bet you feel satisfied [EH] and you won't hear me brag
Till I hear the parson say: [BOTH] "It's in the bag."

[BJ] Say, you must be bright. [EH] Well, I'm not a fool.
[BJ] Where'd you get your wisdom from? [EH] I got it all in school.
[BJ] Ah, you're in love with she? [EH] And she's in love with me.
[BJ] Well, do you love each other? [EH] Why, it's plain as A-B-C!

[EH] It's in the bag; she's got a hundred thou.
[BJ] It's in the bag; how can I use some now?
[EH] Well, I'm not the kind that's selfish. [BJ] After you are wed,
Will you get half? [EH] Don't make me laugh! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
It's in the bag; [BJ] you'll buy a bungalow
[EH] That I will pay for [BJ] with all her dough,
[EH] And maybe in a year or so, [BJ] the stork will write a tag.
[BOTH] Near the package he will say: "It's in the bag."

[BOTH] Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Now take a politician; he'll tell you with a grin:
"I know who'll win; I'll let you in."
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
[BJ] We know who'll be elected, and we don't mean to brag:
[EH] A republican or democrat! [BOTH] Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! It's in the bag!


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAFF IT OFF / LAUGH IT OFF (Kalmar/Ruby)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Aug 11 - 01:23 PM

LAFF IT OFF!
Words and music by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby.
New York: Henry Waterson, ©1924.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

It doesn't pay to worry; it doesn't pay to fret.
If you lose or win, always wear a grin.
All you can get from worry is wrinkles on your brow.
We found a way to live long; let's tell the folks just how:

If your bankroll is bent, laugh it off.
When they call for the rent, laugh it off.
When a fellow borrows ten,
And you lend it to him when,
All you can do is whistle "Till We Meet Again."
If you feel on the bum, laugh it off.
If you're caught selling rum, laugh it off.
If your wifie runs away
And they bring her back next day,
Laugh it off, O brother, laugh it off.

If your new shoes are tight, laugh it off.
If your wife snores at night, laugh it off.
If someone tells you to go
Where there is no ice or snow,
Don't get excited, brother; you don't have to go.
If you're down in the dumps, laugh it off.
If your kids have the mumps, laugh it off.
If you're sick and Doctor Quack
Puts a plaster on your back,
Laugh it off, O brother, laugh it off.

No matter how it's breaking, don't let them see you frown.
If the road is rough, always throw a bluff.
If you wake up some morning with nothing in your purse,
Don't go around complaining; tomorrow may be worse.

If your hair's falling out, laugh it off.
If your wife's getting stout, laugh it off.
When the world looks black and blue,
Think of this because it's true:
Graveyards are full of guys who'd gladly change with you.
If you slip on a peel, laugh it off.
If you choke on a meal, laugh it off.
If the doctor says you're dead,
Never argue; keep your head.
Laugh it off, O brother, laugh it off.

If your gas bill is steep, laugh it off.
If you toss in your sleep, laugh it off.
If your car is out of gear
And you bump somebody's rear,
Phone your insurance man and sing "I'm Sorry, Dear."
If you lose at the track, laugh it off.
If you sit on a tack, laugh it off.
If you accident'ly trip
And break something on your hip,
Laugh it off, O brother, laugh it off.

If you ha-ha-ha-ha, laugh it off.
If you ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
If you ha-ha-ha-ha, laugh it off.
If you ha-ha-ha-ha, laugh it off.
Have your fun; don't be a dunce.
They can only kill you once.
Laugh it off, O brother, laugh it off.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ME NO SPEAK-A GOOD ENGLISH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Aug 11 - 02:28 PM

ME NO SPEAK-A GOOD ENGLISH
Words and music by Harry Pease, E.G. Nelson and Moe Schenck.
New York: Leo. Feist, ©1923.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1924.

[EH] Tell me, Tony, why the people nickname you The Cheat.
[BJ] That's-a just-a what I am.
[EH] They say you have a diff'rent girl for each day in the week.
[BJ] I'm just a wop, great big ...(?).
[EH] Well, you must spend lots of money. [BJ] No, I never have to pay.
[EH] But when you get the gimmies, tell me what you have to say.

[BJ] Hey, me no speak-a good English. [EH] You mean you don't understand?
[BJ] No, I no like-a this-a bus'ness. [EH] You mean when they're holding your hand?
[BJ] Sure! Me no long in this-a country. [EH] But you're a wise Italian man.
[BJ] I'm a wise-a wop! I please-a them, I tease-a them, I squeeze-a them like that!
[EH] But when they say, ah, sweet papa, your baby needs a hat,
[BJ] Hey! Me no speak-a good English. [BOTH] I no can understand.

[EH] How about that girlie with the fascinating eye?
[BJ] I think she's make a very good-a loving bride.
[EH] You took her out and when she didn't try to make you pay,
[BJ] I just-a act-a more than satisfied.
[EH] But soon she got the gimmies. [BJ] Sure! I put her to the test.
[EH] And then you had to tell her just like you told all the rest:

[BJ] Hey! Me no speak-a good English. [EH] But I guess you understand.
[BJ] Yes, but I no like-a dis-a funny business, you know. [EH] Ah, please let me hold your hand.
[BJ] Hey! What's a matter? Me no long in this-a country. [EH] But you're a wise Italian man.
[BJ] You told 'em! I treat 'em fine on red wine. I spent-a ev'ry cent.
[EH] But when they start to cry and say they haven't got room rent,
[BJ] Hey, me no speak-a good English. [BOTH] I no can understand.

[EH] You pick the mountain; you take them back.
[BJ] I take-a them any-a-where.
[EH] But when they tell you that they must take a cab,
[BJ] I tell-a them take-a the air.
[EH] If they want to make love, you never refuse.
[BJ] I give-a them all-a they wish.
[EH] But when they tell you that they need new shoes,
[BJ] That's just when I no capisc'
[EH] You get a license if they want to wed. [BJ] I open a barber shop.
[EH] But when they tell you that they don't like spaghett', [BJ] they no want-a marry a wop.

Hey! [BOTH] Me no speak-a good English. I no can understand.
What this monkey business when you hold-a the hand.
Me no long in this country. I'm a poor Italian man.
[BJ] They tell-a me they marry me, and they're a merry wid',
[EH] But when you find out that they have a half-a-dozen kids,
[BJ] Hey! [BOTH] Me no speak-a good English. I no can understand.


[Note: the word "wop" would be unacceptable today, and the ethnic stereotyping is in questionable taste, but the theme of male-female relations is universal and still current. I hope someone can find a way to salvage this song by judiciously changing the words. If not, just consider it an interesting portrait of life in an earlier era.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: MR. HOOVER AND MR. SMITH (Magidson/King)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Aug 11 - 05:28 PM

This is not exactly a parody, but it seems to hark back to a song called MISTER GALLAGHER AND MISTER SHEAN, which Jones & Hare recorded in 1922. Lyrics to MISTER GALLAGHER AND MISTER SHEAN have been posted in a thread called Burlesque/vaudeville joke routines.


MR. HOOVER AND MR. SMITH
Words by Herb Magidson; music by Robert King.
New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co., ©1928
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1928.

—You know, I had a dream the other night; I saw two famous men.
—Where did they meet, upon the street? —Yeah, they shook hands and then
They started talking in a friendly way.
—Well, well! Won't you tell me what they had to say?

—Yes. Who is the grandest, greatest man this country ever knew?
—Oh, it's you, Mister Hoover. —No, it's you, Mister Smith.
Excepting Georgie Washington; he was a good man, too.
—He's not running, Mister Hoover. —Well, what a break, Mister Smith!
Are you dry? —I can't remember. —No?
—But I'll know, know, know in November.
—Well anyhow, you'll get one vote, because I'll vote for you.
—Be yourself, Mister Hoover! —Keep the change, Mister Smith!

I've heard the politicians say that you have got technique.
—What's technique, Mister Hoover? —It's the bunk, Mister Smith.
Why don't you bring your family to visit me next week?
—Great idea, Mister Hoover. —Bring your lunch, Mister Smith.
Do you trust in your supporters?
—I did once but now I use garters.
—I'm feeling kind of hoarse today. Why, I can hardly speak.
—Try some oil, Mister Hoover. —No, I'm cured, Mister Smith.

—That was a funny dream. —Wasn't it though?
You know this dream was such a funny sight. It certainly was queer.
—Well, tell me, did they crack a smile? —No, they were both sincere.
I listened and I didn't miss a word.
—Well, well, now, let's hear some more of what you overheard.

—All right. How will you treat the farmers if they put you in the chair?
—Once a week, Mister Hoover. —Applesauce, Mister Smith!
I think you'll like the capital. They give you lots of air.
—Hot or cold, Mister Hoover? —Just hot air, Mister Smith.
Oh, I hear you're from the East Side.
—No, you're wrong, old tup. It's the "wet" side.
—What will you give the people who have done more than their share?
Vacuum cleaners, Mister Hoover. —Why not cough drops, Mister Smith?

I've got some new ideas that I'd like to use next fall.
—Hope you do, Mister Hoover. —Yes, you do, Mister Smith.
I hear you've got some wrinkles up your sleeve, and that ain't all.
—Lots of wrinkles, Mister Hoover. —Press your pants, Mister Smith.
You look swell in your brown derby.
—Shows I'm not high-hatting you, Herbie.
—Well, anyhow, I've got to go. I hear my party call.
—Reservoy, Mister Hoover. —Skip the gutter, Mister Smith.

[BOTH] Let us harmonize a bit and exercise our throats.
—Yo-de-o-lady, Mister Hoover. —Sole Mio, Mister Smith.
[BOTH] Now that's the way to do it; shows we really know our oats.
—You sing bass, Mister Hoover. —Very base, Mister Smith.
Now we might sing Annie Laurie.
—Yes, we might, but we might be sorry.
[BOTH] We'd better quit this singing if we want to get more votes.
—You're a genius, Mister Hoover. —You're another, Mister Smith.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NO ONE KNOWS WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Aug 11 - 06:58 PM

NO ONE KNOWS WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
Words & music by Billy Rose & Harry Woods.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1924.

Why do men and women love each other?
And should they take a chance or should they not?
When they marry, will they face
Heaven or the other place?
Which is which and who knows what is what?
I don't know; you don't know; he don't know; she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.
Boy and girl try their luck.
Preacher man earns a buck.
They go in, but they can't get out.
Now married life, married life, sweeter than fudge,
Ah, but some day, will they say, "Good morning, judge"?
Well, I don't know, and you don't know, and he don't know, and she don't know,
And no one knows what it's all about.

Ev'ry man who's hungry for the White House
Says the other party is a fake.
Democrats, republicans,
Put each other on the pan.
After all, what diff'rence does it make?
Well, I don't know; you don't know; he don't know, and she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.
Why do wise little guys
Marry gals twice their size?
That's the thing I can't figure out.
What a life when your wife towers above!
What the deuce do they do when they make love?
I don't know; you don't know, and he don't know, and she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.

[Operatic passage in Italian, apparently, ending in laughter]

—What are you laughin' at?
—Why, I'm laughin' at the same thing you're laughin' at, Bill.
—Well, I'm singin', Ernest.
—You're singing? Well, what are you singing about?

I don't know; you don't know; he don't know; she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.
Never steal just a dime.
If you do, you'll do time.
Steal some oil and they'll let you out.
Our police never cease closing cafés.
How do cops drive their own autos these days?

Well, I don't know; you don't know, and he don't know, and she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.
I don't know; you don't know; he don't know; she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.
Tell a joke; sing a rag; give them hope; tell a gag.
We don't know what it's all about.
Sing it fast; sing it slow; now sing it hot.
Well, do the folks think that we're funny or not?
I don't know; you don't know; he don't know, and she don't know.
No one knows what it's all about.


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH, GEE! OH, GOSH! OH, GOLLY, I'M IN LOVE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Aug 11 - 12:54 AM

The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music has this song. This provides a fine opportunity to show how Jones & Hare arranged songs to turn them into dialogs.

First the sheet-music version:

OH, GEE! OH, GOSH! OH, GOLLY, I'M IN LOVE!
Words by Olson and Johnson. Music by Ernest Breuer.
New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder Co., ©1923.
"Eddie Cantor's Big Song Hit in Ziegfeld Follies"

VERSE 1. A boy and girl were walking,
Oh, walking, yes, walking,
And as they stood there talking,
He stole a little kiss.
The girlie started giggling,
Oh, giggling, yes, giggling,
And as the boys stood wiggling,
He shyly told her this:

CHORUS 1: Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly, I'm in love!
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh, it's you I'm thinking of!
I love to hold your teeny weenie hand in mine.
I get a piggly-wiggly feeling down my spine.
Oh, me! Oh, my! Oh, how I'd love to kiss!
I swear that home could never be like this.
You've got all my nerves unstrung.
Let's be foolish while we're young.
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly, I'm in love!

VERSE 2. He went home to his mother,
His mother his mother;
They looked at one another,
And then he bowed his head.
She said, "You look suspicious,
Suspicious, suspicious,
What ails you Aloysius?"
He raised his eyes and said:

CHORUS 2: Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly, I'm in love!
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh, it's you I'm thinking of!
I love to feel her hairnet on my manly chin.
No wonder I use Cuticura for my skin.
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, how I'd love to fly,
And float among the clouds up in the sky!
When the preacher says, "You're one,"
Holy Gee, won't we have fun?
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly, I'm in love!

*
And here's the version sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys):


OH, GEE! OH, GOSH! OH, GOLLY I'M IN LOVE.

VERSE 1. —Last night I saw you walking.
What, walking? —Yes, walking.
I had to do some talking
To get a little kiss.
Oh, say, I heard her giggling.
What, giggling? —Yes, giggling.
And she can do some giggling!
Say, I heard her tell you this: —What, Bill?

CHORUS 1: —Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —It's true! —It's true! —It's love I'm thinking of.
—I saw her rest her hairnet on your manly chin.
That's why I'm using Cuticura for my skin.
—Oh, me! —Oh, me! —Oh, my! —Oh, my!Her kisses must be bliss!
—I swear that home could never be like this.
She'll have all your nerves unstrung.
Well, we'll be foolish while we're young.
Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!

CHORUS 2: [2 lines tacit]
—I love to hold her teeny-weenie hand in mine.
You get a piggly-wiggly feeling down your spine.
[2 lines tacit]
She'll have all your nerves unstrung.
Well, we'll be foolish while we're young.
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!

VERSE 2. —I went home to her mother.
Her mother? —Yes, her mother.
We looked at one another.
—And I'll bet you bowed your head.
She really looked suspicious.
—Suspicious? —Yes, suspicious.
She called me Aloysius.
And you raised your eyes and said:

CHORUS 3: —Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee —It's true! —It's true! —It's love I'm thinking of.
Why all the merry garden on your shirts and ties?
You cannot help but get them when you smell so nice.
—Oh, me! —Oh, me! —Oh, my! —Oh, my!Her kisses must be bliss!
—I swear that home could never be like this.
Why? Does her ma come along?
I don't know. She don't belong.
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!

CHORUS 4: —Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —It's true! —It's true! —It's love I'm thinking of,
I hear that you're a caveman when you're in the dark.
With me they're just as helpless as a German mark.
—Oh, me! —Oh, me! —Oh, my! —Oh, my!Her kisses must be bliss!
—I swear that home could never be like this.
Soon the preacher'll make you one.
—Holy gee, ain't we got fun?
—Oh, gee! —Oh, gee! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, gosh! —Oh, golly, I'm in love!


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD KING TUT (Jerome/Von Tilzer)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Aug 11 - 08:15 PM

OLD KING TUT
Words, William Jerome. Music, Harry Von Tilzer.
New York: Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., ©1923.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Hey mister!
—Yes?
—Can you tell me where King Toot-Toot-and-Come-In's tomb is?
—Ha-ha! Why, tut, tut, tut, my boy! You mean King Tutankhamen's tomb.
—Aye, that's the man. Do you know anything about him?
—Do I know anything about him? Why, you just listen to me:

VERSE 1: Three thousand years ago,
In history we know,
King Tutankhamen ruled a mighty land.
He ruled for many years
'Mid lots of song and cheers.
He made a record that will always stand.
Why, they opened up his tomb the other day and jumped with glee.
They learned a lot of ancient history.

CHORUS 1: In old King Tut-Tut-Tutankhamen's day,
Beneath the tropic skies,
King Tut-Tut-Tut was very wise.
Now old King Tut-Tut-Tut was always gay.
Cleopatra, see,
Sat upon his knee.
Hat(?), that's where she sat.
The girls would dance for him and ev'ry move a treat.
They'd move and move and move but never move their feet.
A thousand girls would dance each day
With lots of hip, hip, hip hooray
In old King Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut, King Tutty's day.

VERSE 2: His tomb instead of tears,
Was full of souvenirs.
He must have traveled greatly in his time.
The golden silverware
That they found hidden there
Was from hotels of ev'ry land and clime.
While going through his royal robes they found up in his sleeve
The first love letter Adam wrote to Eve.

CHORUS 2: In old King Tut-Tut-Tutankhamen's day,
The dances then in style
Would even make the old sick smile.
In old King Tut-Tut-Tutankhamen's day,
On the desert sands,
Old King Tutty's band
Played while maidens swayed.
They danced for old King Tut 'neath moonlit skies for warmth.
They wore such happy smiles and were in perfect form.
They danced for him both fat and thin.
He didn't care a darn what shape they were in,
In old King Tut-Tut-Tut, King Tutty's day.

CHORUS 3: In old King Tut-Tut-Tutankhamen's day,
There was no Mister Heinz
With fifty-seven diff'rent kinds.
In old King Tut-Tut-Tutankhamen's day,
Peaches of that land,
They were never canned,
Pears left(?) anywhere.
Why, Sam from Alabam' would not run one, two, three.
Oh, what a mark he'd be for old Mark Antony!
Why Valentino as a sheik,
He wouldn't last a half a week
In old King Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut-Tut, King Tutty's day.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ON MY UKULELE (TRA LA LA LA LA)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Aug 11 - 07:33 AM

ON MY UKULELE (TRA LA LA LA LA)
Words and music by Mitchell Parish, Mike Morris and Lou Herscher.
New York: Joe Morris Music, ©1924
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

Now I love people north and south, people east and west,
But of all the people in the world you love yourself the best.
There's nothing ever worries me; nothing makes me blue.
When trouble knocks upon your door, tell me what you do.
On my ukulele, on my ukulele,
I keep strumming gaily, tra-la-la-la-la-la-la!

Now you were sitting on the fence. What do you think of that?
A bulldog came right up behind and bit me where I sat.
My girl is pretty as can be; she's got the cutest bob.
You're going to be married soon, as soon as she gets a job.
On my uke, on my uke,
On my uke, tra-la-la-la-la-la-la!

A boy stood on the burning deck; his hands were full of blisters.
His pants got burned and I just learned he had to wear his brother's.
I called upon my girl one night; her dad came home real late.
You asked him for his daughter's hand; he handed you the gate.
On my ukulele, ya-ha-ha-ha-ha!
On my ukulele, ya-ha-ha-ha-ha!

The Prince of Wales met sister once, ran out and bought a ring,
But she said, "You can talk to me when they crown you king."
Now there's a certain guy I know, a most conceited chap.
When I looked up his fam'ly tree, I found he was the sap.
On my ukulele, on my ukulele.
I keep strumming gaily, tra-la-la-la-la-la-la!

I feel so awfully sore today; I'm lit up like a lamp.
For two cents you'd go out right now and lick a postage stamp.
We couldn't find the baby once while sitting in the park.
But since you feed him garlic now, you find him in the dark.
I bought myself a radio; it's wonderful, by gosh!
But the neighbors use your aerial to hang up all their wash.
On my ukulele, yoodle-yoodle-yoodle-yoodle-you-do!
On my ukulele, yoodle-yoodle-yoodle-yoodle-you!

My brother is a plumber, and oh, how he can plumb!
He plumbs by day and plumbs by night; I'd say that's plumbin' some.
A girl I know fell down the stairs and got some awful thumps.
Now she's got water on the knees; that's why she's wearing pumps.
If rain makes all things beautiful, it's sure some recipe!
I'm goin' out some stormy night and let it pour on me.
On my ukulele, ya-ha-ha-ha-ha!
On my ukulele, ya-ha-ha-ha-ha!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Chris in Portland
Date: 21 Aug 11 - 11:29 AM

Loving this - imagine Mitch Parish could write Stardust and then the Uke Song!

"I bought myself a radio; it's wonderful, by gosh!
But the neighbors use your aerial to hang up all their wash."

My mother told how the family first put the crystal radio in the punch bowl to get better sound, and then how her brother started stinging wire across the backyard for an aerial. Good times if you had a Ford!

But I'd still take Dead Egyptian Blues over the Tut song.
Chris in Hot Hot Portland


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Subject: Lyr Add: PASTAFAZOOLA (Van & Schenck)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Aug 11 - 03:24 PM

PASTAFAZOOLA (1927)
Words & music by Gus Van & Joe Schenck, ©1927
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Good morning, paisan.
—Ah, buongiorno, signore. Come stai?
—Oh, I'm fine. Come stai to you, paisan.
—Oh, molto bene.
—Hey, what are you doin' anyhow? You workin'?
—Work-a? Oh, boss, I got a fine-a job now.
—Yeah?
—I'm a politish'.
—What do you mean, you're a politish'?
—Oh, I got a swell-a job. I politish' the boulevard. Yeah, paisan. Say, I tell you something. You know where's a restaurant?
—Why Joe, what kind do you want?
—Oh, a nice-a place. You capisce? Where they make Italian dish?
—Well now, there's Tony's. Do you see?
—Where?
—Two blocks down the street.
—All right. Goodbye. That's the place for me.
—Well, what are you going to eat?

—Pastafazoola. —Will you tell me what you mean?
—Sure I tell. Pastafazoola. That's-a noodle and-a navy bean.
—First antipasto. —I must order it some time.
—And then you must-o have Italian wine.
Pastafazoola make-a weak-a man-a strong.
Pastafazoola make you live-a very long.
You want-a be a great big sheik? —Yes.
—Make-a women bite-a you cheek? —Sure.
—Well, don't be a fool; eat pastafazool.
He's-a very good. He make you feel fine, you know?
Now paisan, want-a something great?
—Sure. Come on, I'll have a plate.
—I'll bet you my barber shop.
—Well, I'll take one bite and then I'll stop.
—Hey waiter, waiter, come on, make-a hurry up!
—Don't be so foolish!
—Well now, what-a you want? You ask-a me what to eat.
Just bring us one big dish.

[To the tune of Finiculi, Finicula:]
La-la, la-la, la-la-la-la-la
La-la, la-la, la-la-la-la-la
La-la-la-la, La-la-la-la, la-la-la-la.

Pastafazoola, it's-a very good to eat.
—Say what makes Babe Ruth hit a home run?
—And what-a Mister Rockefeller make a lot o' mon'?
—What makes Jack Dempsey think he can fight?
—Pastafazoola, 'cause he eats him ev'ry night.
—Well, what makes McCormick sing a high note?
—And what made Christopher Columbo take a boat?
What's-a make-a Mussolini boss of Italy?
—And what made Lindbergh fly across the sea?

Pastafazoola! We will tell you what we mean.
Pastafazoola! Noodle and-a navy bean.
First antipasto, you must order it sometime.
And then you must-o have Italian-a wine.
Pastafazoola! Make-a weak-a man-a strong.
Pastafazoola! Make-a live-a very long.
—And if you want a great big chest,
—Push the buttons off-a you vest,
—Don't be a fool. Eat pastafazool.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SERGEANT FLAGG & SERGEANT QUIRT
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Aug 11 - 12:29 AM

The name is misspelled "Quirk" at the Internet Archive web site.


SERGEANT FLAGG & SERGEANT QUIRT
Words and music by Lou Klein & Billy Moll.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

You're in the army now.
You're in the army now.
You'll never get rich by diggin' a ditch.
You're in the army now.
Company, halt!

—Well, it's about time.
—What's the idea? What do you mean by talkin' in rank?
—Well, because I got some'n' to say.
—Well, if you want to talk to me, write me a letter.
—Well, if I did, you couldn't read it.
—Says you!
—Says me!
—If I had a face like yours, I'd walk backwards.
—Yes, and if I had a physog like yours I'd grow whiskers. Ha-ha-ha!
—Who did that? I'll find out. I'll tell the cockeyed world,

—We are two men upon the screen,
—The biggest laughs you've ever seen.
—We're two marines who fight in peace or war.
—Why, you never saw such hard-boiled guys.
—For cussin' we could take a prize.
—And here is how we make the people roar:
—Hey, Sergeant Flagg!
—Yeah, Sergeant Quirt!
—Why, you horse marine, you need a manicure.
—Is that so? You're gooey.
—Who?
—Oh, you're gooey!
—Who? Not one percent of half of you is pure.
—Say listen, Quirt.
—What is it now?
—You know, I notice no mosquitoes bother you.
—Yes, they fly right past me bunk.
—That's because they know you're punks.
—Says you!
—Says me! I'll tell the cockeyed world.

—[Sound of machine-gun fire]
—Wait a minute! Wait a minute! Who fired that machine gun?
—I did.
—And what for?
—Me foot's asleep and I want to wake it up.
—Ah, you're asleep all over.
—Yes, well, I'm not the only one.
—Meanin' me?
—Meanin' you!
—I suppose you'd like to put me to sleep?
—Yeah, with a spade.
—Says you!
—Says me!

—We guys have fought in ev'ry war,
—And over ev'ry girl we saw.
—We've asked a million girls to be our wives.
—So I will say I hope you choke.
—And I will say I hope you croak.
—Yet, for each other we would give our lives. Oh, Sergeant Flagg!
—Yeah, Sergeant Quirt?
—You think that you got personality.
—Is that so? You bozo!
—Who?
—You bozo!
—Who? What you have got is poison-ality.
—Say listen, Quirt.
—What's that, Sergeant Flagg?
—You say the girl you kissed last night blushed?
—Did she blush, I hope to shout!
—That was measles breaking out.
—Says you!
—Says me!
—I'll tell the cockeyed world.

—Company, attention! Forward march! Hep, hep, hep....
—[Female voice speaking French]
—Well, if it ain't my old friend Sploney!
—Oh, I'm so very, very much happy to see you again, mon cheri.
—Well, I'm not exactly cryin' meself, baby,
—[More French]
—Well, it's K-O with me, baby. Let's go.
—Hey, hey, what's the big idea? Come back here! We're on our way to war!
—Well, the war can wait. Ha-ha-ha!
—So it was you all the time!
—Says you!
—Says me!
—I'll tell the cockeyed world.


[Captain Flagg and Sergeant Quirt were the 2 main characters in the play "What Price Glory" (1924), written by Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings. It was adapted to film twice, first starring Victor McLaglen and Edmund Lowe in 1926, and later, James Cagney and Dan Dailey in 1952. In the play, Flagg and Quirt were played by Louis Wolheim and William Boyd, who later became famous as Hopalong Cassidy.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: SHE HAS A LITTLE DIMPLE ON HER CHIN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Aug 11 - 05:15 PM

SHE HAS A LITTLE DIMPLE ON HER CHIN
Words and music by Nat Osborne, George B McConnell, & Irving Bibo.
New York: Bibo-Lang, Inc., ©1929
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

There's a maiden in our town
By the name of Mary Brown.
She has a little dimple on her chin.
All the fellows in our town
Follow Mary all around
Because she has a dimple on her chin.

Mary hasn't pretty clothes
And she hasn't silken hose.
She has a little dimple on her chin.
She has freckles on her nose.
Still she has a lot of beaux
Because she has a dimple on her chin.

—What do you say to a little dance, William?
—Terrific idea! ... There!

At our house each night at nine
All the fellows wait in line
To see the little dimple on her chin.
When they call, they hang about
Till her father kicks them out
Because she has a dimple on her chin.

She went to a beauty place
Where they lifted up her face
And how lifted it, it was a sin.
Now you look at her and see
Where the forehead used to be:
The pretty little dimple on her chin.

—Now we'll dance with our hats off.
—Yes, it's warm enough.

Once she wasn't feeling good
So she went to Doctor Wood
And asked him what was wrong when she went in.
He examined her then he
Said to her: "All that I see's
A pimple in the dimple on your chin."

Our poor Mary is a fright
When she goes to bed at night.
Her hair is false and so is ev'ry limb.
She removes her wooden leg,
Hangs her teeth upon the peg,
But she don't remove the dimple on her chin.

—Ah, the sailor's hornpipe!
—Now, hats on.
—Heave ho!

As a party years ago,
Ev'rybody that you know
Recited soulfully of Gunga Din,
But those classics are passé,
For the folks recite today
"She Has a Little Dimple on Her Chin."

Scientists from near and far
Came by aeroplane and car
To study Mary's dimple on her chin.
Then they made a big report:
It was nothing but a wart
And not a little dimple on her chin.

—Now on one foot.

Once to Washington she went
And in Congress, ev'ry gent
Was staring at the dimple on her chin.
Speeches stopped upon the floor.
Senators began to roar:
"She has a little dimple on her chin!"

Then the Speaker got real mad
Yelled, "Have order! This is bad!
Take the floor now, Senator O'Flynn,"
But the senator turned red.
"Mister Speaker, sir," he said,
"She has a little dimple on her chin."

Though it doesn't mean a thing,
We could sing and sing and sing
About the little dimple on her chin,
But we're running out of rhymes,
So we'll sing another time
About the little dimple on her F-A-C-E, chin.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SHE KNOWS HER ONIONS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Aug 11 - 07:22 PM

SHE KNOWS HER ONIONS
Words and music by Jack Yellen; Milton Ager; Lew Pollack.
New York: Ager, Yellen & Bornstein, ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

SPOKEN PATTER: —Say, Bill, do you remember Sally Brown that we went to school with?
—Yes, Ernie, I do.
—Well, wasn't she a dumb Dora in school, especially in arithmetic?
—Well, she might have been dumb at school, Ernie, but you should see her subtract now.
—Subtract? What do you mean subtract?
—Well, she takes ten from one, and twenty from another one,—just a girl what knows her onions, Ernie.
—Ha-ha-ha! Hey, Bill, you know—

VERSE 1: On Broadway the other day I met someone you know.
—Peggy Joyce? Is she in town?
—Don't be a fool; it was Sally Brown.
—Oh, you mean the village queen? —Yes, she's in a Ziegfeld show.
—That so? —And she's made quite a name.
—Well, she's just a chorus dame.

CHORUS 1: —Yes, and she rides in a limousine.
—Ah, she knows her onions!
—Well, tell me please just what you mean.
—Ah, she knows her onions!
—She's just a farmer's daughter, brought up in Ioway.
—Her father never taught her the things she knows today.
—You say she knows her onions. I don't quite get your talk.
—I'll bet she has no bunions. —Why? —She don't get out and walk.
—Ah!
—She's got mink and sable fur,
—And all she gets is forty per.
—She's a girl who knows her onions!

VERSE 2: —Well, by gum, that gal was dumb back in the village school.
—She has changed somehow.
That gal's well educated now.
—Well, the teacher said her brain was dead. —That teacher was a fool!
She's smart, I'm telling you.
—Well, I'll give her credit, too,

CHORUS 2: 'Cause she's got diamonds in her ear.
—She knows her groceries!
—And you ought to see her lavaliere.
—Ah-ha-ha, she knows her vegetables!
—This simple country maiden from fields of new-mown hay—
—And you should her p'radin' along the Gay White Way!
—She stays out after 'leven, right in the city's whirl,
—'Cause she believes that heaven protects the woikin' goil!
—Ah!
—She's got lots of stocks and bonds.
—Gentlemen prefer the blondes.
—She's a girl who knows her onions!

CHORUS 3: She's got money in the bank.
She knows her onions!
No one but herself to thank.
She knows her onions!
She hates finale-hoppers. She don't like college boys.
She likes the sugar-poppers who buy expensive toys.
She hardly ever dances with a collegiate sheik.
She don't take any chances; she likes 'em old and weak.
Ah!
—Never goes on auto dates
—Without takin' roller skates.
She's a girl who knows her onions!

Ah!

[Finale hopper: a person who enters a theater, music-hall, stadium, etc., after ticket-takers have left; a deadbeat.

[Sugar-popper: sugar-papa; sugar-daddy.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: SO IS YOUR OLD LADY (Dubin/Burke)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Aug 11 - 11:37 AM

SO IS YOUR OLD LADY
Words by Al Dubin, music by Joe Burke.
New York: Jack Mills, Inc., ©1926
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: —You're cuttin' up; you're chasin' 'round; you're leading a gay old life.
—I've got a little secret, Bill; I hope you won't tell my wife.
I've got to meet a party; oh boy, what eyes!
—If you think you're a smarty, I'll put you wise.

CHORUS 1: You've got to go out; you've got a big date.
—I've got to go out; I'm coming home late.
—So is your old lady.
You're takin' 'em out and you're payin' the bills.
—I'm hungry for love; I'm looking for thrills.
—So is your old lady.
—I've got a longing for some baby's kisses.
—Someone may be kissing the missus.
You're getting too gay; you're getting too hot.
—I'm getting away with a terrible lot.
—So is your old lady.

PATTER: —Listen, Bill: in this next verse, you've got to sing the part of my wife.
—I'll take your wife's part any time, Ernie.
—All right, Bill.

VERSE 2: —Listen here: I'm sorry dear; I've got to go out tonight.
—Well, I know it's business, so don't worry; with me it's quite all right.
—Well, you know I hate to leave you. —Why, just be on your way.
—And I'm afraid I'll grieve you. —Ha-ha-ha! Oh, that's okay!

CHORUS 2: You've to go out; you've got a big date.
—I've got to go out; I'm coming home late.
—And so is your old lady.
You've got a sick friend who's got to be watched.
—I'm taking along a bottle of scotch.
—So is your old lady.
—I've got to cheer up somebody that's lonesome.
—Well, don't think I'm home by my ownsome.
You're gettin' too gay; you're gettin' too hot.
—I'm getting away with a terrible lot.
—So is your old lady.

CHORUS 3: You're getting too cranky, getting too cross.
You're wondering how to get a divorce.
And so is your old lady.
You're learning to Charleston, learning to step.
You're full of new life and full of new pep.
And so is your old lady.
—Though you don't think I'm as young as I was, dear,
—I know somebody who does, dear.
You're starting to flirt; you're starting to fall.
You're acting like you wasn't married at all,
And so is your old lady.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SPRING IS HERE (Bennett/Carlton)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Aug 11 - 12:40 PM

SPRING IS HERE
Words and music by Geo. J. Bennett and Sam Carlton.
New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co., ©1926
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER:—Good morning, William. How are you?
—I'm fine Ernie. Isn't it a beautiful spring day?
—It certainly is, Bill, and I do love spring. I love to see the nighting-glories blooming in the mid-day sun.
—Ha-ha-ha! And the double-breasted robins throwing off their winter overcoats and singing their sweet evening song.
—Ah, Bill, isn't that music lovely?
—Let us sing the spring song, Ernest.
—All right, Bill. Let's do so.

VERSE 1: —When the clouds begin to gather and they hide the sun,
Why, that's a sign it's going to rain.
—And when a fellow thinks that two can live as cheap as one,
Why that's a sign —Sign of what? —That he's insane.
—You believe in signs, it's very easy to see.
—Yes, I believe in signs, and you'll agree with me:

CHORUS 1: When the birdies in the trees start to sing their melodies,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—When you see the BVDs waving gently in the breeze,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—When you see the nurses pushing baby buggies in the park,
—Yes, and with the coppers they hold hands and spoon until it's dark,
—When the mustard bites the hot-dog —and they all begin to bark,
—Then you'll know that spring is here.

VERSE 2: —If a black cat crossed your path, it's bad luck, you will say.
Now that's just fine, 'cause that's a sign.
—Well, uh, tell me how you foretell things that happen ev'ry day.
—Because each kind's a pet of mine.
—Well, uh, are there any signs that tell the time of the year?
—Sure, there are lots of signs. I will make them clear.

CHORUS 2: When you see the boys all flock with their overcoats to hock,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—When you see the weaker sex wrapping furs around their necks,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—When department stores all advertise the biggest sales on earth,
—The women go a-bargain hunting and they're filled with mirth,
—When they pay two bucks for stockings —and they show ten dollars' worth,
Then you'll know that spring is here.

CHORUS 3: When the garlic starts to bloom and gives out its sweet perfume,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
When you see a fairy queen flitting up and down the green,
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—When your wifie from the attic all your golf sticks starts to lug,
—You're happy 'cause you think at last for golf she's got the bug,
—But when she hands you the stick, —says, "Go out and beat the rug,"
Then you'll know that spring is here.

CHORUS 4: * * * [tacit line]
Then you'll know that spring is here.
* * *
Then you'll know that spring is here.
—Atchoo! Atchoo! —What are you sneezing about, Bill?
—Atchoo! Atchoo! Ha-ha! What's the matter with you, Ernie?
—It's the old thing, Bill.
—Now we know that spring is here.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THAT'S A LOT OF BUNK
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Aug 11 - 09:27 PM

The following transcription comes from the sheet music which you can see at the University of Mississippi web site. Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) stick pretty close to the original words, but they change the order of the verses and change a line here and there.


THAT'S A LOT OF BUNK
Words and music by Al Wilson, James A. Brennan, and Mack Henshaw.
New York: Edward B. Marks Music Co., ©1923.

VERSE 1: "Don't believe a thing you hear, nor half of what you see,"
Mother always said to me when I was a kid of three.
Now I know that she was right, right in ev'ry way.
In the papers ev'ryday, here's what the headlines say:

CHORUS 1: Chorus girls are darn good cooks.
That's a lot of bunk.
And they love to read good books.
That's a lot of bunk.
Two girls took two boys in their car.
When they got out pretty far,
The boys said, "Stop or we'll tell Ma."
That's a lot of bunk.
Father get the hammer. There's a fly on baby's head.

VERSE 2: This fool song has got no sense, when all is said and done,
But I think it's lots of fun, and I've only just begun.
Now I hope the audience won't think I'm a bore,
And I hope they won't get sore, 'cause I'm gonna sing some more.

CHORUS 2: Taxi drivers never cheat.
That's a lot of bunk.
Cops are always on their beat.
That's a lot of bunk.
I took a showgirl out with me,
Dined at Cafe de Paris.
She said, "I'll just have cake and tea."
That's a lot of bunk.
She knocked my apartment, and so I knocked her flat.

CHORUS 3: Waiters never take a tip.
That's a lot of bunk.
Car conductors never gyp.
That's a lot of bunk.
Why only just the other day
I phoned two thousand miles, and say,
I got my number right away.
That's a lot of bunk.
Was engaged to a girl with a wooden leg, but I broke it off.

CHORUS 4: My landlord's a poor old gent.
That's a lot of bunk.
And he's never raised the rent.
That's a lot of bunk.
The cats in all the yards, oh, my!
They sing so sweet; they sing so high,
I love to hear their lullaby.
That's a lot of bunk.
We got a goat without any nose but, gosh, how he can smell!

CHORUS 5: Everybody loves to die.
That's a lot of bunk.
Little babies never cry.
That's a lot of bunk.
I met a tramp whose funds were low.
I listened to his tale of woe,
And said, "Poor man, take all my dough."
That's a lot of bunk.
Throw a sponge in water, then you'll see something swell.

CHORUS 6: Actors lead an awful life.
That's a lot of bunk.
Every man's true to his wife.
That's a lot of bunk.
The soldiers fought for you and me.
They fought for our liberty.
They'll get their bonus; wait and see.
That's a lot of bunk.
Automobiles come from China, because they go "Hong Kong."


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH OWNS THE VILLAGE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Aug 11 - 11:55 PM

THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH OWNS THE VILLAGE NOW
Words by Leslie Moore, music by Johnny A Tucker.
New York: A. J. Stasny Music Co., Inc., ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —Under the blacksmith chestnut tree, there was moss upon the ground, and—
—The smith a mighty name has he, the same as Jones and Brown.
—Ha-ha-ha! Hey, Bill! We've got that thing all wrong.
—Well, everything's different in the village now, Ernie.
—Well, say—

VERSE: Why not tell the folks right here
How the blacksmith's acting queer?
Why, they think he's an honest bloke
Who bears a heavy yoke.
Oh, they would never know him now.
Did he change? Oh, boy, and how!
He heard one morn an auto horn
And things are diff'rent now.

CHORUS 1: Underneath the chestnut tree the service station stands.
The smith is mighty wealthy now and owns a lot of land.
Why, there's a car born ev'ry minute
With a yokel riding in it.
He gets 'em comin', gets 'em goin'.
How his bankroll keeps on growin'!
He used to go on Sunday just to hear the parson pray,
But he don't go to church no more, for that's his busy day.
Hey, two bits a pint he gets for gasoline and water.
Oh, the village blacksmith owns the village now.

CHORUS 2: Underneath the chestnut tree the service station stands.
The smith is mighty wealthy now and owns a lot of land.
Why, he has five or six garages,
Bigger diamonds than the raja's,
And he's a devil, likes to revel.
Why can't he be on the level?
He used to love the children and would play with them each day,
But now he sells them lollipops and takes their dough away.
Hey! Honk! Honk! There goes the horn. He earns another dollar.
Oh, the village blacksmith owns the village now.

PATTER: —Hey, Bill! No wonder the village blacksmith owns the village now. You know he's a pretty smart fellow. Do you remember the other day when we were at the service station? One of the town boys came up to him and said, "Say, mister blacksmith, which nut on an automobile is the most important?"
—And the blacksmith told him, didn't he, Ernie?
—You bet!
—He said the nut that holds the steering wheel is most important!

CHORUS 3: Underneath the chestnut tree the service station stands.
The smith is mighty wealthy now and owns a lot of land.
On the fairground he's a faker,
Fools the boys with his dice shaker,
Sells Doc Munyon's cure for bunions.
He's no rube; he knows his onions.
He used to toil and labor till the sweat rolled down his chin,
But now he tips his neighbor on the horse that's going to win.
Hey! "Clang! Clang!" go the pearls upon his wife and daughter.
Oh, the village blacksmith owns the village now.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHAT DOES THE PUSSY CAT MEAN WHEN SHE...
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Aug 11 - 12:26 AM

WHAT DOES THE PUSSY CAT MEAN WHEN SHE SAYS "ME-OW" (1924)
Words and music by Harry Pease, N. T. Granlund and Ed. G. Nelson.
Melbourne: Allan & Co., ©1924.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: I went to school; that's how I got my knowledge.
Well, that's nothing great, 'cause I went all through college.
I know one thing that that you can't answer me.
Well, what can that one thing be?

CHORUS 1: What does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?
Why the same as the little dog means when he says, "Bow-wow."
I know that hay means horses,
And marriage means divorces,
But what does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?

VERSE 2: My sister May got married last December,
And that certain day you always will remember.
When the preacher said, "Honor and obey,"
The crowd began to say:

CHORUS 2: What does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?
The same as the little dog means when he says, "Bow-wow."
I know that clams mean chowder,
And a shiny nose means powder,
But what does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?

BRIDGE: I know that church means Sunday and that Friday means a fish.
I know that wash means Monday and a platter means a dish.
I know a boy means mister and a girlie means a miss,
And when her lips touch his lips then I know it means a kiss.
A baby means a rattle and a barrel means a keg,
And when a chicken cackles, you can tell she's laid an egg.
I know that green means Irish and that Irish means a cop.
Limburger means a Dutchman and spaghetti means a wop.

CHORUS 3: So what does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?
The same as the little dog means when he says, "Bow-wow."
I know that rain means water,
And two bits mean a quarter,
But what does the pussycat mean when she says, "Meow"?


[The word "wop" would be unacceptable today.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHAT! NO WOMEN?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Aug 11 - 08:20 AM

This song offers another example for study of how Jones & Hare did their adaptations. First, here are the lyrics from the sheet music which I found at the University of Mississippi:


WHAT! NO WOMEN?
Words by Jack Meskill & Walter C. Ness. Music by Marty Bloom & Maurice Sturm.
New York: Irving Berlin, Inc., ©1926.

VERSE 1: Johnny White said, "I'm in right; a big time's on tonight.
With all the girls, I'll be a smarty."
Kept his date at half-past eight, made sure he wasn't late,
To meet the girls down at the party.
He took one look 'round the flat.
Then grabbed his coat and his hat, and hollered:

CHORUS 1: What! No women? What kind of a party is this?
Now where are the flappers you spoke of today?
This looks like a branch of the Y. M. C. A.!
What! No women? Why, they're my specialty.
To sing about Sweet Adeline may have its charms,
But I prefer Sweet Adeline right in my arms.
This is no party for me.

VERSE 2: In his tux, with seven bucks, his collar washed in Lux,
John hunts the girls at ev'ry party.
Latest style and greatest smile, he's saying all the while,
"Bring on the girls; I'm hale and hearty."
But when he finds there are none,
Here's what this son of a gun will holler:

CHORUS 2: What! No women? What kind of a party is this?
You said I'd get Muriel so I brought my car,
But now you say Muriel is just a cigar.
What! No women? Say, really it's a crime,
I came up here tonight all set to hug and kiss,
But heaven help a sailor in a night like this.
Thanks for the terrible time!

CHORUS 3: What! No women? What kind of a party is this?
Now, I like the chicken in your fricassee,
But I must have chicken served right on my knee.
What! No women? Say, they're the spice of life.
You said, "Now don't bring Lulu 'cause she don't act right,"
But you can bet that Lulu would have saved the night.
Guess I'll go home to the wife.

* * *
They were rather more free than usual with this adaptation:

WHAT! NO WOMEN?
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: [BJ] Hello, Ernie.
[EH] Hello, Bill.
[BJ] Are you all set for the party?
[EH] Sure I am. Look at me. And I hope there'll be plenty of women there, because women, women, women is what I crave.
[BJ] You're always shoutin', "Women, women, women is what I crave." Listen, I never saw a fellow like you.

VERSE 1: [BJ] Let me take your hat and coat. Just make yourself at home.
[EH] Am I in time for this big party?
[BJ] You're right on time and the table's set, but not for food alone.
[EH] Gee, that sounds fine. Where is this party?
Will I meet Mabel and Grace? [BJ] Mabel and Grace?
[EH] Mm. [BJ] No women at all in this place, and that's final.

CHORUS 1: [EH] What! No women? [BJ] That's right. [EH] What kind of a party is this?
[BJ] A very nice party. I said that this party was strictly a stag.
[EH] Well, you know I can get a kick out of chewing the rag.
What! No women? [BJ] Absolutely. [EH] Why, they're my specialty.
[BJ] We'll sing "Sweet Adeline," for singing has its charms.
[EH] Ah, but I prefer sweet Adeline right in my arms.
[BJ] "Sweet Adeline, [EH] My Adeline."
What! No women? [BJ] Posilutely. [EH] Well, this is no party for me.

PATTER: [BJ] Ah, this is a good party. Don't complain at all.
[EH] Something else I want to tell you:

VERSE 2: [EH] You know, when I'm dressed up in my best, you know I'm always blessed.
I find the girls at ev'ry party.
[BJ] The latest style and the greatest smile, you're saying all the while,
"Bring on the girls." [EH] Yes, I'm hale and hearty.
[BJ] But when you find there are none. [EH] Mm.
[BJ] Here is what I always hear you holler:

CHORUS 2: [BJ] "What! No women?" [EH] You bet! [BJ] "What kind of a party is this?"
[EH] Ha-ha-ha! [BJ] I told you that you'd get Muriel if you brought your car.
[EH] Yes, and now I find Muriel is just a cigar.
What! No women? [BJ] You heard me. [EH] Say, really it's a crime.
What was that girlish laughter just as I passed by?
[BJ] Oh, that was just a fellow with a red necktie.
[EH] What! No women? [BJ] Well, thanks for the use of the hall.

CHORUS 3: [BOTH] What! No women? What kind of a party is this?
Now, I like a smoker, and poker's just grand,
But I must have wheels(?) when I start holding hands.
What! No women? I guess I'd better roam.
[BJ] Too bad the Ringling Brothers' Circus ain't in town.
[EH] Yes, you might have had the bearded lady to come down.
[BOTH] What! No women? Well, me for the old ladies' home.


[As much as I like their arrangement, I think they made a mistake in leaving out the line "Guess I'll go home to the wife."]


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN LINDY COMES HOME (George M Cohan)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Aug 11 - 08:18 PM

Publication data from WorldCat.org:

WHEN LINDY COMES HOME
"Written in honor of the aerial triumph of Charles A. Lindbergh."
"Dedicated to the American public exclusively through the Chicago Herald and Examiner and Associated Hearst newspapers."
Words and music by George M Cohan
[Chicago, Ill.: Chicago Herald and Examiner], ©1927

First Line: He's a coming He's a coming, Hear the drumming, Rum-tum-tumming
First Line of Chorus: Oh say what a day when Lindy comes home, When Lindy comes home to his mother


Lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys):

PATTER: Here he comes, Ernie.
Yes, here he comes, Bill.

VERSE 1: He's a-coming; he's a-coming.
Hear the drumming, rum-tum-tumming.
See those flags, oh, boy, how they fly,
And see those airplanes up in the sky.
Oh, hear them humming; hear them humming.
Lindy's coming; Lindy's coming home.

CHORUS 1: Oh, say, what a day when Lindy comes home,
When Lindy comes home to his mother.
Say, what a day from the earth to the dome.
Like the ancients of Rome, we shall welcome him home.
Oh, wait and see America rise
With one, two, three, four fourth of Julys.
Oh, say, what a day from Gotham to Nome,
When Lindy comes back from across the foam,
To his home sweet home.

VERSE 2: Crowds are teeming, eagles screaming,
Bedlam breaking, hist'ry making,
Yankee Doodles singin' their song.
Hear that shrieking, worshipping throng.
All wild and willing, he is thrilling.
Lindy's coming; Lindy's coming home.

CHORUS 2: Oh, say, what a day when Lindy comes home,
When Lindy comes home to his mother.
Say, what a day, what a hip-hip-hooray.
We'll put Europe away with the honors we'll pay.
The cannons' roar you'll hear in the air.
A thousand bands will play over there.
Oh, say, what a day for poet and poem,
When Lindy comes back from across the foam
To his home sweet home.

REPEAT CHORUS 1.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHO CARES ANYHOW (Midgley/Van Cleve)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 07:15 AM

WHO CARES ANYHOW
Words and music by Charles Midgley & Fred Van Cleve
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) (1929)

1. They say that ev'ry fireman wears suspenders that are red,
Because they hold his trousers up and keep him out of bed.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
My folks all say I was born this way, but who cares anyhow?

2. A bumblebee will never sing about his little honey.
I hardly think a policeman's club will ever strike me funny.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
I know some jokes that that I can't tell folks, but who cares anyhow?

—Say Bill, what's the difference between the North and the South Pole?
—All the difference in the world, Ernie.

3. I never saw a butterfly that ever could make butter,
And even all the nicest streets will end up in the gutter.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
I'm so darn bright that I shine at night, but who cares anyhow?

—Ernie, did I tell you my last Scotch story?
—I hope so.

4. They call me maple sugar 'cause I'm just a refined sap,
And when my girl feels all run down, she winds up in my lap.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
You'll all agree something's wrong with me, but who cares anyhow?

—Speaking of Scotch jokes, you know I often wonder how you ever get away with all the Scotch jokes that you tell.
—Well, half of my ancestors were Scotch.
—What was the other half?
—Oh, ginger ale.

5. A bullfrog lives a long, long time although each night he croaks,
And I know my sweetie's not so hot because she never smokes.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
It's a crazy song and it won't last long, but who cares anyhow?

—Hey, Bill! Whatever became of your sister?
—Oh, she has a new position now.
—What's she doing?
—She's a waitress in a lunatic asylum.
—A waitress in a lunatic asylum?
—Yeah, she carries soup to nuts.

6. They say that a banana skin will make a lovely slipper.
I don't believe I'll ever drink moonshine from the big dipper.
But who cares? Who cares? Who cares anyhow?
We tolled the bell, but the bell can't tell, but who cares anyhow?

Who cares? Who cares?
Who cares? Who cares?
Who cares who cares anyhow?
I do! I do! I do! Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Oh, we don't care. We know you don't care.
So who cares anyhow?


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHY AREN'T YEZ EATIN' MORE ORANGES?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 08:22 AM

WHY AREN'T YEZ EATIN' MORE ORANGES? (FROM CAL-I-FOR-NI-AY)
Words, Lew Brown. Music, Clarence Gaskill. ©1925
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —Say, Ernie, you have to be a doctor in this record.
—All right, Bill.
—Say, doc!
—What is it, Bill?
—Do you think I'll live to be a hundred years old?
—Well, I don't know. Let me see, do you smoke?
—No.
—Do you drink?
—No.
—Do you stay out late at night?
—No, sir.
—Do you run around with the flappers?
—I should say not!
—Well, what in the world do you want to live to be a hundred years old for?
—Well, anyway, there's something wrong with me.
—Well, there must be if you've come to me.
—Well, there will be if I pay you.
—Do you mean that you won't pay me?
—Well, how much do I owe you, doc?
—Well now, let me see. You owe me for four visits already, and this makes five.
—Well, put it all on one bill and I'll disappoint you in a lump.
—Ha-ha-ha...! Come, Bill. Let's get into the song. All right, Dave.

VERSE 1: —Oh, tell me tell me, doctor, what can be wrong with me?
—Say, have you got a headache or water on the knee?
—Well, someone said I'm full of prunes; that's why I'm sad and blue.
—Say, here's the only remedy. —Please tell me what to do.

CHORUS 1: —Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
—I don't know. I'll get myself a Sunkist maiden.
—And I'll bet you'll like her orange aidin'.
Oh, the fruit of the old apple tree
Is a lot of applesauce today.
—Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?

PATTER: —Say, Bill, you know my father's doing very well since his operation.
—Say, Ernie, what did the surgeon do when he operated on your father?
—Well there must be some catch in this. What does the surgeon do when he operates on my father?
—Sews your old man!
—Ha-ha-ha...!

VERSE 2: —Oh, tell me tell me, doctor, what is this pain right here?
—If you had waited one day more, you would have died, I fear.
—Well, is the case a chronic one? I'd love to know. Oh gee!
—I'll write a nice prescription, sir. —Oh, doctor, let me see!

CHORUS 2: —Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
—You know my sweetie's very fond of fruities.
—Well, go buy a box of Sunkist beauties.
—You can go there and eat them, you see.
It's a great investment any day.
—Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?

CHORUS 1: Why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?
Go get yourself a Sunkist maiden.
I'll bet you'll like her orange aidin'.
Oh, the fruit of the old apple tree
Is a lot of applesauce today.
Say, why aren't yez eatin' more oranges from Cal-i-for-ni-ay?


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Subject: Lyr Add: OH, YOU CAN'T FOOL AN OLD HOSS FLY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 01:59 PM

Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), sing a shortened version of this, with a few new lines and some patter between the verses.

From the sheet music at Indiana University:


OH, YOU CAN'T FOOL AN OLD HOSS FLY
Words & music by Blanche Franklyn. Nat Vincent, and Harry Von Tilzer.
New York: H. Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., ©1924.

1. April fool we all learned at school. It comes but once a year.
Most ev'ry one has a lot of fun each time that day draws near.
Now, you can fool some folks sometimes, once Lincoln he did say,
But I will ne'er forget the words that I heard my old dad say:

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, you won't find feathers on a bulldog's legs.
A hen won't lay you hard-boiled eggs.
It snows but never in July.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

2. Adam Howe had a Jersey cow who had a little calf.
He named the calf Elizabeth, which made the neighbors laugh.
He asked the folks what made 'em grin. Their answer was a wow:
"You named that calf Elizabeth but it ain't that kind a cow."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, you won't call rye-bread choc'late cake.
You can't get milk from a cow named Jake.
A Turkish bath's an alibi,
But you can't fool an old hoss fly.

EXTRA VERSES AND CHORUSES:

3. Flossie Green the village queen in autos liked to roam;
Had a mishap for a city chap, made Flossie walk back home.
She got home late; her dad got sore, and said, "Here's what to do:
Next time you go in an auto, Flo, take roller skates with you."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, a bee won't hurt you when he's buzzin' around,
But glory hallelujah when the bee sets down!
He'll sting you where the clouds roll by.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

4. Farmer Brown came to New York town to see the Gay White Way.
He took a stroll and his bankroll passed out in just one day.
When he got home, a friend said, "Gee, I'll be you bought Grant's Tomb."
He said, "Not me. I fooled 'em, see. I bought the Hippy-Drome."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, a mouse ran up an elephant's trunk,
But he's too wise to fool with a skunk.
Crabapples won't make pumpkin pie.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

5. A suffragette made a little bet that in this land of free,
A woman nowadays could be what any man could be.
A young man in the crowd spoke up; his answer made her wild.
Said he, "I'd like to see you be the father of a child."

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
A dog sat on the trolley track.
A car hit him an awful smack.
We'll have hot doggies by and by.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

6. Abie Fein said to Finklestein, "I passed your house today.
I saw you hug and kiss your wife. You sure can love, I'll say!"
Said Finklestein to Abie Fein: "Such funny words you speak!
I'll tell you true, the joke's on you; I ain't been home for a week!"

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, Finklestein said, "Listen to me.
If you saw your wife on Goldberg's knee—."
Said Abe, "I'd sell the darn settee!"
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly

7. Humpty Dumpty took a fall from off the wall, great Scott!
He raised a great big bumpty on his goodness-knowsy-what.
You know the reason why he fell? I'll tell you pretty quick:
His wifie caught him flirtin' and she soaked him with a brick.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Now, Jack and Jill went up the hill.
They went for water but they found a still,
And that's why they came tumbling down.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

8. Doctor Small he used to call on sick folks every day.
He fell in love with a Mrs. Dove, a married woman gay.
One night he fell into a well; we heard him loudly groan.
He should have tended to the sick and let the well alone.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Young Johnny Jones marries Sally Meek.
They plan a home, just so to speak:
A dollar down and a sheriff a week.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

9. Mary had a little lamb, which made the fellows laugh.
They made her sore because they yelled, "Oh, look at Mary's calf!"
She got so mad she got a gun and shot her lambie dead,
And now she takes her lamb to school between two hunks of bread.

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
George Washington would never tell a lie.
He chopped down the cherry tree but didn't say why.
His favorite fruit was cherry pie.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.

10. Now, Percy Hare wed Peggy Clare; they fell in love at sight.
Their honeymoon they started soon and on their bridal night,
Her teeth came out; her hair came off; poor Percy said, "Oh, gee!"
When Peg took off her wooden leg, he yelled, "I married a tree!"

CHORUS: Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.
A camel goes dry for a week, I vow,
But who the H—— wants to be a camel now?
Bootleggers say we still get rye.
Oh, you can't fool an old hoss fly.


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU'RE IN KENTUCKY, SURE AS YOU'RE BORN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 07:44 PM

The following lyrics are from the sheet music at IndianaHistory.org: Click for a PDF. Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) stick pretty close to the original lyrics, but they embellish the song with some new lines after the first chorus.


YOU'RE IN KENTUCKY, SURE AS YOU'RE BORN
Words and music by George A. Little, Haven Gillespie & Larry Shay
New York: Broadway Music Corporation, ©1923.

1. I've heard a lot 'bout Paradise,
But Paradise ain't half as nice
As my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
You'll sure believe just what I say
If you should ever stray some day
Down to my old Kentucky home.
It won't be hard to find
If you'll keep this on your mind:

CHORUS: When you see a field where grass is blue,
And ev'rything looks good to you,
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.
When a million sunbeams light your way,
Says, "Come on, stranger, won't you stay?"
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.
When the shadows creep,
You can go to sleep
On a carpet of moonbeams.
You can dream your dreams
'Neath a blanket of gleaming stars.
If you wake at dawn 'mid glist'nin' dew,
And find old Dixie kissin' you,
You're in Kentucky sure as you're born.

2. I'd surely love to fall asleep,
Let pretty dreams around me creep
Of my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
Just put me on a railroad track.
Won't need no train to take me back
To my Kentucky home-sweet-home.
If you go down there someday
Please remember what I say: CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: I'VE NEVER SEEN A STRAIGHT BANANA (Waite)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 11 - 10:00 PM

You can hear this at YouTube:


I'VE NEVER SEEN A STRAIGHT BANANA
Words and music by Ted Waite
Melbourne : E.W. Cole, ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys), 1927.

VERSE 1: –I have seen lots of funny things in my time.
–But there's one thing you've not seen, I'd like to bet.
–What's that? I'd like to know just what I have been missing.
–Well, I'll tell you in the chorus but not yet.
–Why, now you've got me puzzled. Won't you tell me what you mean?
–The thing that's in my mind I must confess I haven't seen.

CHORUS 1: I've never... –Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.
–I guess you'll admit
You've searched quite a bit.
–They're even curved when they are served in my banana split.
–I have seen them by the carloads
On the Delaware and Lackawanna.
–Have you ever, ever? –No I've never.
I've never seen a straight banana.

PATTER: –Crazy song, ain't it, Bill?
–Yes, it is.
–Ha-ha-ha!

VERSE 2: –I recall when I was in Alaska,
I have seen the sun shine twelve o'clock at night.
–Yeah? I have seen the waterfalls in old Niagara.
I confess that it's a most impressive sight.
–I'd like to see that certain thing, but if it's not to be,
We'd like to meet somebody else who saw what we can't see.

CHORUS 2: –I've never... –Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.
–Though they're things I hate,
Millions I have ate.
–Well, I'll bet you've yet to see bananas that are straight.
–I have traveled far to find one.
–Yes, I heard you were in Chile and Havana.
–Still I never... –Never? Never what? –Never... –Never what?
–I've never seen a straight banana.

CHORUS 3: Well I never (never), never (never), never (never), never (never),
I've never seen a straight banana.
Once I chanced to see
A murder mystery.
The jury found the pris'ner guilty in the first degree.
All at once we heard the pris'ner
Holler out, "This is the truth, your honor,
But I've never (never), never (never), never (never), never (never),
I've never seen a straight banana."


[The Red Hot Jazz Archive also has recordings by Harry Reser and His Orchestra and Waring's Pennsylvanians .]


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU DON'T LIKE IT—NOT MUCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 10:49 AM

YOU DON'T LIKE IT—NOT MUCH
Words and music by Ned Miller, Art Kahn and Chester Cohn
New York: Leo. Feist Inc., ©1927.


[First, here are the lyrics as they appear in the sheet music, which can be seen at the State Library of Victoria (Click for a PDF.):]


VERSE 1: Honey baby, you look so happy to me,
And I'm wondering what the reason can be.
Though you hide it somehow,
I can understand now.
What the reason is, it's so easy to see.
You show it—

CHORUS 1: When I hug you and when I squeeze you and when I please you and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I kiss you and when I tell you your lips are thrilling to touch,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I hold you close in my arms awhile, you love it.
You sigh and then you smile, contented.
When I press you and I caress you and you say "I love you" and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.

VERSE 2: Honey baby, your eyes just sparkle like dew.
There's a secret in them I wish that I knew.
Though they beg me to guess,
There's no need, I confess.
I can tell it by simply looking at you.
You show it—

CHORUS 2: When I hold you, when I enfold you, and when I scold you and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I phone you and say I'm lonely to see you only and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
When I whisper sweet nothings in your ear, you love it.
You smile and cuddle near, contented.
When I petcha and say, "You betcha, I'm glad I metcha," and such,
You don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.


[And here are the lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) at YouTube:]


VERSE 1: —Billy, Billy, you look so happy to me.
—Thank you! Ernie, Ernie, there's nothing diff'rent, you see.
—Well, what's that smile that you wear?
—Oh, that's always been there.
—Well, you can't fool me, 'cause you're as changed as can be.

CHORUS 1: —Well, I'll tell you: I've been huggin' and I've been squeezin' and kind of teasin' and such.
—Yes, and you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—I've been kissing and I must tell you, those lips were thrilling to touch.
—Yes, and you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—Not much. When I hold her up close in my arms awhile, I love it.
—I know now why you smile, contented.
—When I press her and I caress her and I tell her I love her and such,
—Then she don't like it. —No, she don't like it, not much.

VERSE 2: —Now, Billy, Billy, your eyes they sparkle like dew.
—Ernie, Ernie, that shows what loving can do.
—Well, you have sure got it bad.
—Yes, worse than I ever had.
—I can tell it by simply looking at you.

CHORUS 2: —Don't tell me; I know it. When I hold her and I enfold her, I often scold her and such.
—And she don't like it; no, she don't like it, not much.
—Not very much! When I phone her and say I'm lonely to see her only and such—
—And you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.
—No, and I call around and when lights are low, I love it.
—Her brother hangs around, all evening.
—I buy him candy and say he's dandy, but I could kill him and such.
—And you don't like it; no, you don't like it, not much.

CHORUS 3: People write us, think they delight us; they boost our singing and such.
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
They befriend us; some gifts they send us and often get us in Dutch.
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
—Records that we make they say sell real good, so spend it.
—We hear that you can get offended.
We lose patience with our vacations; we go to Europe and such,
And we don't like it; no, we don't like it, not much.
—Not much!
—Too much!


[The Internet Archive has recordings by:
Golden Gate Orchestra
Paul Ash and His Orchestra
Harry Bidgood, with vocal by Ramon Newton
The Boston Syncopators, with vocal by Arthur Fields
Sol S. Wagner and His Orchestra, with vocal by the Brown Sisters

[YouTube has recordings by:
Jan Garber and His Orchestra
The Rhythmic Eight]


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Subject: Lyr Add: ETIQUETTE BLUES (Gayle Grubb)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 03:44 PM

You can hear this at YouTube:


ETIQUETTE BLUES
Words and music by Gayle Grubb
New York: Stasny Music Corp., ©1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: We're the guys that wrote the book on etiquette.
Yes, we know just how all your vittles should be et. (I'll say we do!)
We have writ this little book about mistakes we've saw.
Now take 'em down and don't forget that what we say is law.

CHORUS 1: Always leave your spoon right in your coffee. (Look out for your eye.)
Starting with your soup, first sound your 'A', then play The Pilgrims' Chorus.
Napkins are to catch the food that bounces off your knife,
And tuck the napkin in so it will stay underneath your double chin.
And always put both elbows on the table.
Many other pointers we could mention.
Now always gesture with your fork.
Keep your mouth full when you talk.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

CHORUS 2: When your tea is hot, just use your saucer.
Pick the punkin pie up in your hand. (Don't squeeze it.)
Never ask for anything that you can safely reach.
Read rule eighty-two; you'll understand.
Wipe your plate with bread when you have finished. (Mop up.)
Many other pointers we could mention.
Grab your glass so it won't drop,
And always finish when you stop.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

PATTER: We have some more to say on this matter.

VERSE 2: You know, we've been watching people eat for many, many years.
Oh, and the way they eat has driven us to tears. (It's simply awful.)
There's no reason you can't eat polite the same as we.
Yeah, read our book on etiquettey; it's simple as can be.

CHORUS 3: Always mix your peas with your potatoes,
And this makes eating with your knife a cinch.
You know, when somebody asks for bread, grab several pieces in your mitt
And deal 'em out like you were dealin' flinch, (bridge, poker, pinochle).
Take two toothpicks; you might sometimes drop one. (Of course!)
And many other pointers we could mention.
Put your gum beneath your plate,
And eat fast so you won't be late.
Thank you for your very kind attention.

CHORUS 4: Never cut spaghetti up in pieces.
Eat it like a chicken eatin' worms.
When you're eating cake, be sure you eat the frosting first.
Watch out for bacteria and germs.
Always laugh when nothing funny happens.
Many other pointers we could mention.
Fingerbowls are set close by,
In the event your glass runs dry.
Thank you for your very kind attention.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 06:38 PM

Frank Crumit: You're in Kentucky, Sure as You're Born

Thanks for finding "You Don't Like It - Not Much"; what a treat! My first exposure to the Happiness Boys was "Like A Porcupine"--one of those "slated to be learned, but not there yet" songs. Thanks for taking the time to transcribe all of these, and for providing links! Keep 'em coming.

Here are some links to Happiness Boys clips on YouTube. I'm too lazy to make blickies for them all.

Not to worry. A JoeClone has done that for you.

Ain't We Got Fun? (1921)
All By Yourself in the Moonlight (1928)
As a Porcupine Pines for Its Pork
(Down) At the Old Swimming Hole
Barney Google
Collegiate
Crazy Over Horses
Crazy Words, Crazy Tune
Cut Yourself a Piece of Cake
Don't Bring Lulu
Does the Spearmint Lose Its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight?
ditto
Dream Daddy
The Etiquette Blues
The Farmer Took another Load Away! Hay! Hay! (written 1925) (incomplete)
A Gay Caballero
Get 'Em in a Rumble Seat
Hard-Boiled Rose
Henry's Made a Lady out of Lizzie
I've Never Seen a Straight Banana (1927)
I Miss My Swiss
ditto
I Wish I Was in Peoria
I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to My Girl Tonight
In the Little Red Schoolhouse
In the Old Town Hall
Indiana Lullaby (1922)
It Ain't Gonna Rain No More
It Won't Be Long Now
Laff It Off
Maggie
Mamma Loves Papa (1923)
Maybe (She'll Write/Phone Me)
Mister Gallagher and Mister Shean (1922)
Oh Ja Ja
Oh-My-Yes (Us Girls Must Have Our Fun)
The Old Grey Mare
Old King Tut
ditto
On My Ukulele (Tra La La...) (1924)
She Knows Her Onions
Singing in the Bathtub
So I Took the 50 Thousand Dollars (1923)
How Do You Do?
Ten Little Fingers & Ten Little Toes (1921)
That Old Gang of Mine
That's a Lot of Bunk
There's Nobody Else but You
Twisting the Dials
The Village Blacksmith Owns the Village Now
Who Cares, Anyhow?
You Tell Her—I Stutter
ditto

-- Billy Jones solo:
Mary Lou
Yes, We Have No Bananas

-- Ernest Hare solo:
Doodle Doo Doo
I Makes Mine Myself
I Ain't Afraid of Nuttin' Dat's Alive
Hallelujah, I'm a Bum (The Bum Song; singing as "Hobo" Jack Turner)
ditto
Mindin' My Business (singing as Bob Thomas)
Silk Hi-Hat and a Gold Tipped Walking Cane (1928; as "Hobo" Jack Turner)
Waitin' for the Evenin' Mail (1923)
Yankee Doodle
[This is just a small sampling! Hare recorded with various orchestras, the California Ramblers and the Cotton Pickers; his pseudonyms include Wallace Daniels, Arthur Grant, Henry Jones, Robert Judson, Walter Lang, Walter Leslie, Roy Roberts, Bob Thomas, Bob Thompson, "Hobo" Jack Turner, and Frank Mann.]

-- Al Bernard & Ernest Hare (pre-Happiness Boys)
Cindy
In 1999 (1923)
See Old Man Moon Smile



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Subject: Lyr Add: OH-MY-YES! (Felix Austead)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 11:13 PM

You can see the sheet music at The National Library of Australia, or hear the Happiness Boys sing the song at YouTube.


OH-MY-YES! (US GIRLS* MUST HAVE OUR FUN)
Words and music by Felix Austead
Sydney: Chappell & Co., ©1924.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

1. Doctor Green told Missus Luce,
"Ride a horse and you'll reduce."
She rode four weeks, gained ten in weight,
But the poor old horse lost forty-eight.

CHORUS: Oh, my, yes, us girls* must have our fun.
Oh, my, yes, us girls* must have our fun.

2. Have you seen the girls today
As they stroll along Broadway?
The sun shines east, the sun shines west,
And shines so bright they look undressed.

3. Go in and out the windows.
Go in and out the windows.
Go in and out the windows.
We feel fine today.

4. Mister Burns was brought home dead.
"He's still warm," the neighbors said,
But Missus Burns with tears did shout:
"Hot or cold, he goes right out."

5. You should see Miss Nellie Green,
Funniest gal you've ever seen.
She's got a neck like an old smokestack,
Not as long but just as black.

6. This is the way we wash our clothes,
Wash our clothes, wash our clothes.
This is the way we wash our clothes,
Ev'ry rainy Tuesday.

7. There's a lady, eighty-three.
She lives across the street from me.
She laughs and says, "Ain't nature sweet?
I've just two teeth. I'm glad they meet."

8. Have you heard that Mary Grant
Has a job in a powder plant?
Twelve a week is all it pays,
But in powder plants you get a raise.

9. Mrs. Cohen was looking for
Apartments on the second floor.
Her husband said, "There's no bath here."
She said, "We'll only stay a year."

[* "Girls" in the original sheet music. The Happiness Boys changed "girls" to "boys." They also added verses 3 and 6 above.]

[The sheet music actually has 39 verses, but I didn't consider them worth typing.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 01:37 AM

Have to mention a wonderful song which Billy Jones did without Hare:

Hula Lou: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_R_hi5Yydg
Lyrics by Jack Yellen, music by Milton Charles and Wayne King, 1924. I believe it was first recorded by Sophie Tucker in 1924; obviously her version is a tad different from Hare's. Also recorded by the Carolina Tar Heels (1927) and some others around the same time.

It makes an interesting contrast to this dreamy little earworm by Andy Iola:
Naughty Hula Eyes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0fvNb57nm0


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 02:36 AM

Grrr, that's Andy Iona--I must've slipped into Iolian mode: all accidentals.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 11 - 08:04 AM

The lyrics to INDIANA LULLABY, as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare, are posted in a separate thread--the reason being that there happen to be 2 songs with the same title, and I mistakenly transcribed the wrong one (from the sheet music) at first! Both songs are in the same thread.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DOWN AT THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Sep 11 - 09:51 AM

YouTube has 2 versions of this song. The transcription below comes from Edison 50841-L (although I have omitted some of the patter). Emerson 10427 omits verse 2. Note there is one phrase I can't make out near the end.

DOWN AT THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE
Words and music by Al Wilson and Jim Brennan.
New York: Edward B. Marks Music Co., ©1921.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —Say, Ernest.
—Will?
—How do you feel?
—Oh, I don't know. Why do you ask?
—Well, the reason I asked, I thought that, uh,

VERSE 1: You look very tired and weary.
—I am. I'd like to go where I'd leave my troubles behind.
—I know a dandy place. You'll forget care as soon as you get there.
—Well, Willie, where's this place you have in mind?

CHORUS: —Come along with me. —Where to? —Down to the old swimming hole.
—Why sure! I'd like to be a kid again.
—Well, don't forget to bring along your fishin' pole.
—Could I lie beneath a tree?
—Of course! From care you're going to be free.
—Oh, boy! It's great to lie on the bank and look at the sky.
—Hot dog! And let the rest of the world go by.
—But if it gets too warm, —Why then, we'll dive right into the pool.
—I'll bet that feels nice and cool.
—Why you'll forget about home-sweet-home.
You know that bathing suits are out of style.
—Yes, just a coat of tan and a great big smile,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.

VERSE 2: —Someday is a struggle for fortune.
—Will I find that I have forgotten how to smile?
—Yes indeed! So let's hurry and forget about worry,
And we'll find that life's worthwhile.

CHORUS: Come along with me down to the old swimming hole.
Come on and be a kid again,
And don't forget to bring along your fishing pole.
Underneath a tree,
From care we're going to be free.
It's great to lie on the bank and look at the sky,
And let the rest of the world go by,
And if it gets too warm, we'll dive right into the pool.
It feels so nice and cool,
You'll forget about home-sweet-home.
Bathing suits are out of style.
Just a coat of tan and a great big smile,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.

NEW TUNE: First you take your clothes off, feeling pretty bold.
A kid sticks in his toe and hollers, "Gee, the water's cold!"
You stand around and shiver. Someone hollers with a grin,
"The last one in's a sissy," then you all dive in.
See an old bullfrog, catch him by the toe.
When he starts to holler, then you gotta let him go.
Splashing in the water till the sun begins to set.
You're hungry and you wonder if you supper's ready yet.
When you come to dress, that's when you come to grief.
Your clothes are full of knots and ....(?)
You can't get 'em on and you think you'll take a chance,
So you tie your shirt around you where you ought to wear your pants.
[Silly patter here.]
You spend the whole day gettin' a tan on your face.
At home you get a tanning in a diff'rent place,
When you go down to the old swimming hole.
Come on along!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 02 Sep 11 - 06:26 PM

The line as I hear it is "Your clothes are full of knots and your belly's short o' beef." You might expect it to explain why the trousers in particular were difficult to pull on, but I think it's just pointing out the kids' impatience to get home to supper, so they couldn't be bothered to fuss with their clothes. (What did they do to "knot" them, tie them to branches with a double sheel bend??)

This song was their first recording release as a performing team, in 1921 on Edison records. They had been paired up the year before to sing accompaniment on a Brunswick recording, "All She'd Say Was 'Umh Hum'" (link to another recording of the song; sheet music available at the Lester S. Levy Collection). Since "Swimming Hole" is now in the public domain, I hope the sheet music has been scanned somewhere online, but I haven't found it. I'd like to find the original lyrics, hopefully written for a single singer rather than a duo.

The team was dubbed "The Happiness Boys" to accord with their sponsor, Happiness Candies. When they changed sponsors, they correspondingly changed their moniker, becoming "The Taystee Loafers" for Taystee Bread and "The Interwoven Pair" for Interwoven Socks.

Wikipedia has an interesting article on them which mentions a few other songs, such as "She's the Sweetheart of Six Other Guys" and "We Ain't Never Been to College" (a response to the hit "Collegiate", which they also recorded). Tim Gracyk wrote a good summary of the team's history.

A couple more songs which Jones recorded solo:
Crosswords Between My Sweetie and Me (1925): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDtXM6ac51A
Honolulu Honey (written in 1921?): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt6wV4PsHE (Charles Hart & Elliott Shaw)
Peggy O'Neill (1921): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmk4wMQdj2k


Let me also plug a fun Irving Berlin song from 1920 that I ran across:
After You Get What You Want, You Don't Want It (YouTube clip; sheet music available at the Lester S. Levy Collection)
    Somebody e-mailed me the following:
      My daughter found the lyrics to a very old silly song my mother used to sing to us when we were kids. She was born in 1905. There's a phrase missing in the section under The Old Swimming Hole "New Tune" (Message_ID=3217046). It's after "Your clothes are full of knots" and the phrase is "And you have to chew beef." She explained that this meant you had to use your teeth to try to get the knots out of your clothes.

      Thanks for helping us locate my mother's song, and also my father's, The Eastern Train.

      Doris

    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 06:15 PM

I figured tying clothes in knots was a prank played by some of the boys on some other boys.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GET 'EM IN A RUMBLE SEAT
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 12:49 AM

GET 'EM IN A RUMBLE SEAT
Words and music by Jack Marshall, Carl Lampl, and Morey Davidson.
San Francisco: Villa Morét, Inc., ©1927
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

—Ernie!
—What, Willie?

VERSE 1: Romeo met Juliet upon the balcony.
For his love affair,
He had to climb the stair;
And Antony had Cleopatra sitting on his knee,
But his sweet romance
Just put him in a trance.
Buggy ridin' always had its day,
But we've improved it; here's the latest way:
Say—

CHORUS 1: Get 'em in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get 'em in a rumble seat.
Girlies always crumble.
Like the bees they bumble,
Getting in a rumble seat.
Now they just cuddle up and, oh, boy, how you feel!
You sure can love 'em when you're not behind the wheel.
There's a great attraction
And lots of satisfaction,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
It's a great invention,
And for close attention,
Positively can't be beat.
Now you can love your sweetie in the corner at night,
Ah, but if you want your lovin' and you want it done right,
Just get 'em in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get 'em in a rumble seat.

VERSE 2: Met a boy who had a girl but ... she didn't care.
Why, he was mighty blue,
And wondered what to do.
Told me all about the girl and of his love affair.
Couldn't see at all
Just why she didn't fall.
Then I said, "Why, that is nothing new.
Once I had that very trouble too.
Say—

CHORUS 2: Get her in a rumble,
In a little rumble,
Get her in a rumble seat.
Girlies never grumble,
Even though they stumble,
Getting in a rumble seat.
She can't resist you in your little runabout.
She's got to hug you tight for fear she'll bounce right out.
You won't have to worry
If you only hurry.
Get her in a rumble seat.
Never holler, "No, sir"
When you hold her closer,
'Cause she'll find it mighty sweet.
A horsie knows his oats, but you can take it from me,
A little rumble seat sure knows its upholstery.
So get her in a rumble,
Get her in a rumble,
Get her in a rumble seat.

CHORUS 3: Pick 'em up at random.
You can always land 'em,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
If there's engine trouble,
You'll enjoy it double,
Sitting in a rumble seat.
The chauffeur fools around the motor and you smile,
'Cause you can fool around the old back seat awhile.
If you have a blow-out,
You don't have to go out.
Stay right in the rumble seat.
You can send a wire
For another tire.
Waiting for it is so sweet.
A bus may carry lots of people; that may be right,
But you can carry on much better cuddled up tight.
And ...(?)
You can get familiar
Sitting in a rumble seat.


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Subject: Lyr Add: "MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" (Moore / Tucker)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 06:18 PM

From the sheet music at The National Library of Australia:

"MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" ("COME RIGHT UPSTAIRS")
Words, Leslie Moore; Music, Johnny Tucker.
New York: Clarke & Leslie Songs, ©1923

1. There's a fam'ly right next door
Wakes us up at three or four
When the daughter comes home with her beau.
First they stand outside and chin;
After that, they tiptoe in
And begin their spooning down below.
Then when all is quiet in the hall,
Down the stairs you hear her mother call:

CHORUS 1: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
Why does it take you so long to say goodnight?
You know I've told you always,
It ain't safe to stand in hallways.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Just leave him flat.
I forgot what Mother taught me.
That's the way your father caught me.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

2. Maggie doesn't care a bit
What the neighbors think of it.
She declares that lovin' is no crime.
Even though her sweetheart Dan
Always was a union man,
Maggie has him working overtime.
Now and then they lean against a bell.
Then the whole darn house begins to yell:

CHORUS 2: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
You'll wake the neighbors the way you carry on.
I'm gonna have a copper
Chase that young finale hopper.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Just leave him flat.
Give his face a darn good smacking
If he tries to be wisecracking.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

*
From the recording at YouTube

"MAGGIE!" "YES MA'AM!" ("COME RIGHT UPSTAIRS")
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) - Vocalion B 14644.

1. —Bill, I got a good idea.
Let us tell the folks right here
All about the girl who lives next door.
—Very well! Ev'ry night she's with her beau,
Spooning in the hall below
While her mother's upstairs getting sore.
Though you won't believe it, it's a fact:
This is just exactly how they act:

CHORUS 1: —Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Who's with you there?
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Stop that affair.
Five minutes more, Ma, and then we'll say goodnight.
—You know I've told you always,
It ain't safe to stand in hallways.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Give him his hat.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Please leave him flat.
—I can't do my entertaining
On the stoop because it's raining.
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

2. Since her father made a pile,
Now the fam'ly lives in style
In a mansion on Fifth Avenue,
And Maggie now is Marguerite.
In her heart she's just as sweet.
Tell me, what's an avenue or two?
Now her beau is of a social kind,
So her mother's voice is more refined:

CHORUS 2: —Daughter! —Mother! —Time to retire.
Daughter! —Yes, mother! —Sleep you require.
—Larry(?) is talking about the polo game.
—Don't disobey your parents
Tell him you're engaged to Clarence.
Margaret! —Mater! —Bid him adieu.
—Pater! —What, child? —I'm ...(?) you.
Then, with all her million dollars,
Ma forgets herself and hollers:
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.

CHORUS 3: Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Please ...(?) him quick.
Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —You make me sick.
—Just because you're over fifty,
Don't forget I'm young and nifty.
—Maggie! —Yes, ma'am! —Come right upstairs.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAYBE (SHE'LL WRITE ME...SHE'LL PHONE ME)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 10:08 PM

From the sheet music at Mississippi State University. (Click for a PDF.)

MAYBE (SHE'LL WRITE ME, MAYBE SHE'LL 'PHONE ME)
Words, Roy Turk. Music, Ted Snyder & Fred E. Ahlert
New York: Waterson, Berlin & Snyder Co., ©1924.

1. I've got trouble, oh, what trouble!
Something happened to me!
Came home one day and I found
My sweet one wasn't around.
Haven't heard a single word about the cause of it all.
That's why I'm full of the blues,
Just waiting round for some news.

CHORUS: Maybe she'll write me. Maybe she'll phone me. Maybe she'll radio.
Went away Monday, here it is Sunday, just a long week ago.
I don't know where she went or what made her go.
One thing I know: I'm feelin' mighty worried.
Maybe she's lonesome, all by her "ownsome," longin' for who-knows-what.
Maybe she's sighin'. Maybe she's cryin'. Then again, maybe not.
I don't care what she did or where she went or why she left,
As long as she only hurries back home to me.

2. Always lonely, but I'm only
Getting what I deserve.
I should have known at the start
Someday she'd ruin my heart.
But I'm praying she is saying just what I'm saying now,
For then she'll worry and cry,
And change her mind by and by. CHORUS TWICE


YouTube has 2 versions:
Billy Jones & Ernest Hare. They stick pretty close to the sheet music, except that they change the pronouns as necessary to transform the song into a dialogue.
Ian Whitcomb and Janet Klein They sing an additional chorus which I assume is their own composition.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 08:47 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube:


SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
Words, Jack Meskill. Music, Albert Gumble.
New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., ©1923.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

VERSE 1: —Fifty thousand dollars surely is quite a lot.
—Yes, I'll say it's a lot.
Fifty more than you've got.
—I told my rich uncle I could use it someday.
—You ...(?) the old guy passed away.

CHORUS 1: —So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd have a good time with the roll.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And your good time was a dollar Ingersoll.
—I wanted life insurance; the payments were not high.
—Because you looked so healthy, they thought you'd never die.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
And went and bought a cuckoo for the clock.

CHORUS 2: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd take a trip to Montreal.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And didn't go to Montreal at all.
—One day I met a lady so ...(?)
—I posed her just one dollar, a kiss with you she'd share.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
Oh, gee! Oh, gosh! Oh, golly! I'm in love!

VERSE 2: There are many diff'rent ways ...(?) spending dough,
—And I guess that you know
Fifty thousand or so.
—No doubt uncle left it just for some rainy day.
—But you got rash with all that cash and let it drain away.

CHORUS 3: —So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought that I'd buy something for my home.
—So you took the fifty thousand dollars,
And bought a brush to have a brush and comb.
—My wife and I went shopping to buy a costly gem.
—You jumped into a taxi, drove to the five and ten.
—So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
Then a hundred million others just like me.

CHORUS 4: So we took the fifty thousand dollars.
We thought that we would like to study Greek.
So we took the fifty thousand dollars,
And learned to sing "Bananas" in a week.
—We told the phonograph company they'd have to raise our pay.
—They admitted we worked better, and raised it right away.
So we took the dollar and a quarter.
We're better men than you are, Gunga Din.

*
I haven't seen the sheet music, but I think it's a safe bet that this recording sticks closer to it than Jones & Hare did. You can hear it at Robert's Old Schmaltz Archives:

SO I TOOK THE FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS
As sung by Robert Denning (M. J. O'Connell) on Edison Record 9262.

VERSE 1: Fifty thousand dollars, gee, it is a whole lot.
Though you've got it or not,
Still it is a whole lot.
I told my rich uncle I would use it someday,
So just to be a pal to me, he went and passed away.

CHORUS 1: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd make a big splash with that roll.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought myself a brand-new Ingersoll.
I wanted life insurance; the payments were not high.
Because I looked so healthy, they said I'd never die,
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And went and bought myself a piece of cake.

VERSE 2: There are many ways for you to spend all your dough,
And I guess that I know
Fifty thousand or so.
No doubt Uncle left it just for some rainy day,
But I got rash with all that cash and let it drain away.

CHORUS 2: So I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought I'd take a trip to Montreal.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars,
And didn't go to Montreal at all.
I met a poor gold digger; her feet were almost bare.
She said she needed shoesies; her toesies didn't care.
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And went and bought a cuckoo for the clock.

VERSE 3: There's a politician down in our neighborhood.
He's done ev'ryone good,
Ev'ryone that he could.
Leads the life of Riley, has his own motorcar,
But he feels bad because he's had to buy his own cigars.

CHORUS 3: I took the fifty thousand dollars.
It was a lot to spend on cigarettes.
Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars,
But think of all coupons I could get.
He said, "Get me elected; you may spend all your cash,
But after I'm elected, I'll make sure you get hash."
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought the subway just to get a seat.

CHORUS 4: Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars.
I thought that I would like to study Greek.
Yes, I took the fifty thousand dollars
And learned to sing "Bananas" in a week.
I went to buy an auto; you know it's quite the fad.
The clerk showed me a pink one; it didn't look so bad,
So I took the fifty thousand dollars
And bought Detroit just to get a Ford.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THERE'S NOBODY ELSE BUT YOU (L W Gilbert)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 11:12 AM

You can see the sheet music at Mississippi State University. (Click for a PDF.)

THERE'S NOBODY ELSE BUT YOU
Words and music by L. Wolfe Gilbert
New York: L. Wolfe Gilbert Music Corp., ©1924

1. You believe that I belong to somebody else.
Teardrops they fill your eyes.
You believe that I deceive; there's somebody else.
You're wasting tears and sighs.
Dearie, I'll always play fair.
I'm telling you on the square:

CHORUS: Honey, don't you worry, 'cause there's nobody else,
Nobody else but you.
Why should you be
Jealous of me?
Now I can see
Why we disagree.
Though we part, I cross my heart, there's nobody else.
Honest, I'm faithful and true.
I like to play
And fool around with others.
That's just my way,
Like sisters do with brothers.
Honey, don't you worry 'cause there's nobody else,
Nobody else but you.

2. Nothing makes the heart grow cold like jealousy, dear.
Won't you believe in me?
We must trust each other whether absent or near.
Then we would happy be.
If I were telling you lies,
You'd find it out in my eyes. CHORUS


YouTube has these recordings:
Bennie Krueger's Orchestra, with vocals by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (uncredited). They sing only the chorus.
The Melodist Four (instrumental)
Vincent Lopez (instrumental)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs by The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 11:04 PM

A few more YouTube clips for Jones and Hare songs:

With both:
I Don't Want to Get Married: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vovVivYhn8o
Oh, How I Love My Darling: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5v7dZ8RzTQ
Why Did I Kiss That Girl?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcHhard0a88

Billy Jones solo:
Crosswords Between My Sweetie and Me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDtXM6ac51A
Honolulu Honey (comp. 1921?) (Charles Hart & Elliott Shaw): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt6wV4PsHE
(Crazy over) Horses: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8EW3zQJjPs
        (thread: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140123#3219251)
In the Old Town Hall: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Iu2CfSbdug
        (thread: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140123#3219345)
Peggy O'Neil (1921): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmk4wMQdj2k
When You and I Were Young Maggie Blues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AG7xfexBls
[According to Wikipedia, Jones also worked under these stage names: Harry Blake, Billy Clarke, Lester George, Duncan Jones, Reese Jones, John Kelley, Dennis O'Malley, William Rees, Victor Roberts, Billy West, William West, and Carlton Williams.]

Ernest Hare solo:
All By Meself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFIkBsq-Uc4
Down by the River (1923): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2dw-p-g9cY
A New Kind of Man With a New Kind of Love, That's Me! (1924?): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjaMl_Lkqzs
No Wonder I'm Blue: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEqzad7TlLg
Old Pal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEqo5P_LbXA
Satan, I'm Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ6jdPk22_0

And I goofed in my first post: The Hare recordings of "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum" and "The Bum Song" are of separate songs--both, I believe, written or at least heavily adapted by Haywire Mac McClintock. Above, my first link was to "The Bum Song", my "ditto" link to "Hallelujah".


To the Mudelf who blickified my first post: Many thanks, but there's a reason I usually include the link targets as visible text in messages: so people can easily copy the URLs to their own files along with the other text. Otherwise, only the target description is copied, hidden URLs all get dropped, and it's a pain for people to try to locate to the active links again. In future, please retain any visible URLs as visible text.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THAT'S MY HAP-HAP-HAPPINESS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 01:01 PM

I found this recording with Spotify:


THAT'S MY HAP-HAP-HAPPINESS
Words by Howard Johnson and Charles Tobias, music by Al Sherman.
[New York]: Irving Berlin, 1926.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys)

PATTER: —I have a little something I want to tell you, Bill.
—Yes?

VERSE: —Talk of happiness, real true happiness; do you know what it means?
—Some people say it's wealth,
While others say it's health.
—But there's happiness, just one happiness, I've been longing to find.
—Will you paint a picture, the kind you have in mind?

CHORUS 1: —Think of just a little town
When the evening sun goes down.
That's my hap-hap-happiness.
—Think of just a bungalow
Where the morning glories grow.
Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—Yes. —Don't hesitate or wait; just open the gate
—And walk in with me.
Look around and oh what a home-sweet-home you will see.
—Think of someone if you can,
Saying, "Da-da, here I am."
—That's my hap-hap-happiness.

PATTER: There, Bill, that's my idea of happiness. Now, what's yours?
—Well I'll tell you:

CHORUS 2: When Gene Tunney swings his hand
And I hear his old glove land.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—And when springtime comes around,
For a baseball game I'm bound.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—The umpire starts to shout "You're safe" and "You're out,"
That thrills me, I find,
Even though the home team is one or two runs behind.
When the bags are full, it's great,
—And then Babe Ruth walks to the plate,
—That's my hap-hap-happiness.

PATTER: —That's very good, Bill, but you see, you're a bachelor, and don't get the real line on happiness. In other words, you don't know anything at all about home ties.
—Well, if that's a home tie your wife gave you for Christmas, I don't want to know anything about 'em.
—Well, listen. I'm going to give you my idea of home ties:

CHORUS 3: Ev'ry meal I sit beside
My sweet baby girl, my pride.
—Is that your hap-hap-happiness?
—Yes, she loves potatoes, the little dear.
—She shoves them in your nose and your ear.
—And that's my hap-hap-happiness.
She's full of joy, and boy,
—She breaks any toy her two eyes can see.
—When we bought a new baby grand, —she broke ev'ry key.
—When she breaks things, I'm not sore.
—You go out and buy her more.
—And that's my hap-hap-happiness.

CHORUS 4: —We two boys without a care
Entertain you folks out there.
That's our hap-hap-happiness.
Just to know the things we do
Make us feel we're pleasing you,
That's our hap-hap-happiness.
—Each one beneath the sun should know that he's done
His share while he's here,
—Spreading all around him a little sunshine and cheer.
—If we failed, at least we've tried,
But if you feel satisfied,
That's our hap-hap-happiness.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PARDON ME WHILE I LAUGH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 03:11 PM

Also transcribed from Spotify. Don't take the number of "ha"s too literally.


PARDON ME (WHILE I LAUGH)
Words by Arthur Terker and Jules Von Tilzer; Music by Billy Heagney.
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) , 1925.

VERSE 1: We're going to sing a song to you; it's not a song of love.
There's not a word that speaks of mush and none 'bout stars above.
We've had enough of songs like that; I'm sure you will agree.
So here's the thing we're going to sing; it's foolish as can be:

CHORUS 1: A chorus girl hates anyone to ask her out to dine.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
A Scotsman is the first one who will buy a glass of wine.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The chauffeurs and the traffic cops, they get along so fine,
And all the chauffeurs think the coppers really are divine.
The coppers throw them kisses when they pass before it's time.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

CHORUS 2: The alcohol sold nowadays is for external use.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The fat girls should eat candy; it's the best way to reduce.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
The first child of a married couple brings them great delight,
But when they want to get some sleep, it cries with all its might.
Then hubby says, "You stay in bed; I'll walk with him all night."
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

PATTER: It's a silly song, Ernie.
It is crazy, isn't it?

VERSE 2: In ev'ry song you've ever heard, there's been a second verse.
We've tried to write one for this thing, but it got worse and worse.
We worked on it all summer, through the winter, spring, and fall,
And then we said, "We will not write a second verse at all."

CHORUS 3: Today the girls all love to sit at home each night and sew.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
They never ride in taxis and they hate to see a show.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
A fellow and his wife went out to have a dance or two.
He flirted with the flappers, as the fellows often do.
The wifie said, "You dance with her; I'll wait till you get through."
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us while we laugh.

CHORUS 4: You know, Bill, I wanted to tell you about Phil Ohman.
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon me—ha-ha-ha!—while I laugh.
Sure! I was gonna tell you about Harry Reser.
Ha-ha-ha!—You know they are?—Ha-ha-ha!—Yes.—Ha-ha-ha!—Twins?
Ha-ha-ha!—They play piano and banjo?—Ha-ha-ha!—Oh yes!
Ha-ha-ha!—Pardon us—Ha-ha-ha!—while we laugh.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 03:29 PM

Chester Gaylord singing "That's My Hap-Hap-Happiness": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNZcmed7X0


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY CUTEY'S DUE AT TWO-TO-TWO TO-DAY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 06:59 PM

You can see the sheet music at the Indiana Historical Society web site. (Click for a PDF.) Jones & Hare's recording can be heard on Spotify.


MY CUTEY'S DUE AT TWO-TO-TWO TO-DAY
Words and music by Leo Robin, Albert Von Tilzer, and Irving Bibo.
New York: Bibo, Bloedon, & Lang, ©1926.

I. Lyrics as given in the sheet music:

VERSE 1. Hey there, taxi, do your stuff.
I can't get there fast enough.
Take me to that train from way out west.
I'm just jumping in my shoes
'Cause there ain't no time to lose.
Got a date, one-fifty-eight, with the one that I love best.

CHORUS 1: My cutey's due at two-to-two.
She's coming through on a big choo-choo.
She's been away for months,
But I haven't cheated once.
Stayed home nights, didn't dance,
Wasn't taking any chance,
Didn't flirt, and though it hurt,
I just couldn't do my cutey dirt.
My days were blue, my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me and say,
Don't think there ain't no Santa Claus.
I know darn well there is because
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

VERSE 2. No one knows how glad I am
Since I got that telegram,
Sweeter than a message from above.
Seems just like a century
Since she's been away from me,
But you bet I'm gonna get what I've kept on dreaming of.

CHORUS 2: My cutey's due at two-to-two.
She's coming through on a big choo-choo.
She's been away for months,
But I haven't cheated once.
She's very short, five foot two.
She's got bowlegs, cross-eyed too,
A girl you wouldn't think much of,
But oh, by gosh, how she can love.
My days were blue; my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me and say,
And when I feel her lips on mine,
I won't let go 'til half past nine.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

Tonight I'll disconnect my phone,
Because I want to be alone.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.


II. Lyrics as sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys):

VERSE 1: —Listen, Ernie, I feel gay.
—Why, you're excited, I must say.
—I'm gonna meet that train from way out west.
—Way out west? —Uh-huh. —Well, what's the big idea, old boy,
Of this nervous, sniffin' joy?
—I got a date, one fifty-eight, with the one that I love best.

CHORUS 1: —I know; your cutey's due at two-to-two.
—She's comin' through on a big choo-choo.
—She's been away for months,
—And I haven't cheated once.
—You stayed home nights. —I didn't dance.
—You wasn't takin' any chance.
—I didn't flirt. —Well, I bet that hurt.
—I just couldn't do my cutey dirt.
—Your days were blue. —My nights were black.
—But soon you'll have your cutey back.
—'Cause I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—And when you press her lips divine,
—I won't let go till half-past nine.
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

VERSE 2: —No one knows how glad I am.
—Well, I saw that telegram.
—And it was like a message from above.
—Well, I bet you never sleep a wink.
Nights you lie awake and think.
—But you bet I'll soon forget, when I meet and greet my love.

CHORUS 2: —Your cutey's due at two-to-two.
—She's comin' through on a big choo-choo.
—You're surely feeling fine.
—You know this gal of mine.
—She's kind o' short, —About five-foot-two.
—She's got bowlegs and cross-eyed too,
A girl I wouldn't think much of.
—But oh, my gosh, how she can love!
—Your days were blue. —My nights were black.
—Don't cry; you soon will have her back.
—I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—Tonight you'll disconnect your phone,
—Because I want to be alone.
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.

CHORUS 3: —My days were blue; my nights were black,
But I just knew that she'd come back,
For I love her and she loves me, and, say,
—Don't think there ain't no Santa Claus.
—I know darn well there is because
—My cutey's due at two-to-two today.
My cutey's due at two-to-two today.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: Artful Codger
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 08:35 PM

My Cutie's Due...
The Clevelanders (1926): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWZwIX-zshk
Piccadilly Revels Band (1928): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvP2WNL2Ilc
And catch this one for some fancy hoofin':
Ondřej Havelka: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bui1NgxEqJQ
How can your feet sit still?


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Subject: RE: It Don't Do Nothing But Rain
From: Artful Codger
Date: 01 Jul 14 - 02:15 AM

A catchy down-country rendition of "It Don't Do Nothing But Rain" by Lew Childre:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laGENW6Vobs
This should help fill some gaps in the lyric transcription above.

For comparison, here's the version by Jones & Hare, singing under the names Billy West and Bob Thomas:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8ULFQad1t8

I also see on YouTube a version by Harry Hudson's Melody Men.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM

From the sheet music at the Maine Music Box:


LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
Words and music by Lew Brown and Carl Schraubstader, ©1923.

1. There's a girl I'm wild about.
Ev'ry time I take her out,
I hug her; I squeeze her; I tease her so;
And we always can be found
Where there's no one else around.
Do we cuddle? Do we pet?
You ain't heard nothin' yet!

Chorus 1: I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night on the back porch I loved her best of all.

2. Ev'ry time that she's alone,
When I call her on the phone,
I hurry; I scurry; I worry so.
I'm afraid that I might see
Someone there in place of me.
If I lost her, what a blow!
I love her. Oh! Oh! Oh!

Chorus 2a: I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
The first time that I met her it was true love at first sight.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night in the parlor I loved her best of all.

Chorus 2b: I loved her in a Packard and a Locomobile.
I loved her in a Buick while she held onto the wheel.
I loved her in a flivver and we ran into a wall,
But last night in a taxi I loved her best of all.

Chorus 3: I loved her in a rainstorm and I loved her in snow.
I loved her in a blizzard when zero was below.
I loved her in the sunshine underneath her parasol,
But last night with some moonshine I loved her best of all.

Chorus 4: From Monday until Sunday, oh, I sure am some sheik.
I love her; yes, I love her ev'ry day that's in the week.
Though seven days of heaven ain't enough, I won't get sore,
'Cause next year when it's leap year, I'll love her one day more.

Chorus 5: I loved her at breakfast and I loved her at tea.
I loved her; yes, I loved her when she took her lunch with me.
I loved her after supper when I paid her folks a call,
But last night in between time, I loved her best of all.

Chorus 6: I loved her in a sailboat and a big birch canoe.
I loved her on a tugboat and an ocean liner too.
I loved her in a schooner and I loved her in a yawl,
But last night in a rowboat I loved her best of all.

Chorus 7: I loved her in the classroom in Latin and Greek.
I loved her in Italian; that's a language she can't speak.
I loved her on the campus and in the dining hall,
But last night at the junior prom I loved her best of all.

Chorus 8: [spoken patter] Oh, I love-a Marianna when she play da grand piana.
She's-a push-a; she's-a pump-a wid her feet.
Got a kiss like taste-a fine-a, joost-a like Italian wine-a.
She's-a nice-a; she's-a fat-a; she's-a sweet.
Oh, she call-a me her papa; when she hug-a, she no stop-a.
Got-a eyes-a so-a big-a, no-a small,
But last night she get-a colic when she eat-a lot of garlic,
[Sung:] And I love her best of all.


YouTube has recordings by these artists (and more):
Alma Cogan (1959)
Andrews Sisters
The Carolinians (vocal by Billy Jones)
Paul Whiteman's Orchestra
Green Bros. Novelty Band
Savoy Havana Band, 1924
University Sextette, 1923
Varsity Eight/California Ramblers
The Happiness Boys
The Shannon Quartet, 1923
Pee Wee King & His Golden West Cowboys
Teresa Brewer, 1960
Carl Fenton's Orchestra, 1923
Pete Wendling (on a piano roll)


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Subject: Lyr Add: LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 12:38 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube. This song illustrates how adept Jones & Hare were at turning a song that had been written for one singer into a dialogue-duet.


LAST NIGHT ON THE BACK PORCH (I LOVED HER BEST OF ALL)
As sung by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare, (Okeh 4948-B, recorded 8/23/23)

[SPOKEN:][EH:] Hey, Bill, did I ever tell you this?
[BJ:] No. What is it?

[SUNG:][EH:] There's the girl I'm wild about.
[BJ:] Gee, I'm glad I found it out.
[EH:] I'm crazy. [BJ:] You're crazy, without a doubt.
[EH:] I'm just wild about her eyes.
[BJ:] I bet she's wild about your lies.
[EH:] Well she's my honey; she's my pet.
[BJ:] But y'ain't met nothin' yet.

[EH:] I love her in the morning. [BJ:] Do you love her at night?
[EH:] I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
[BJ:] Please tell me: do you love her in the springtime and the fall?
[EH:] Uh-huh, but last night on the back porch I loved her best of all.

[EH:] Ev'ry time that she's alone—
[BJ:] Do you call her on the phone?
[EH:] Uh-huh. I hurry. [BJ:] You worry; you worry so.
[EH:] I'm afraid that I might see
Someone there in place of me.
[BJ:] If you lost her, what woe!
[EH:] I love her, oh, oh, oh!

[EH:] I love her in the morning. [BJ:] Do you love her at night?
[EH:] The first time that I met her, it was true love at first sight.
[BJ:] Please tell me: do you love her in the springtime and the fall?
[EH:] Uh-huh, but last night in the parlor, I loved her best of all.

[SPOKEN][EH:] Ah, Bill, she's a lovely girl.
[BJ:] I should say so, Ernest. Those eyes!
[EH:] Uh-huh!
[BJ:] Those nose!
[EH:] Yes, yes, Bill.
[BJ:] Those lips!
[EH:] Yes, yes.
[BJ:] Those hair!
[EH:] Yes, yes, and those teeth, Bill, they are beautiful.
[BJ:] Yes, the both of them! On the back porch—
[EH:] Nevertheless, Bill—

[SUNG][BOTH:] I love her in the morning and I love her at night.
I love her; yes, I love her when the stars are shining bright.
I love her in the springtime and I love her in the fall,
But last night on the back porch, I loved her best of all.


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 07:35 AM

From the sheet music at The National Library of Australia:

YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE (SO WHAT ARE YOU GIRLS GONNA DO?)
Words and music by Irving Bibo and William B. Friedlander, ©1927.

1. [GIRL:] When a maiden seeks romance,
There are times she takes a chance,
Even though her boyfriend loves her truly.
I've had my experience,
Therefore as a consequence,
I know boys are bound to get unruly.
Walking back from auto rides, I'll say I've had my share,
But soon the boys will take us out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are we girls gonna do?
When all these future Lucky Lindys want some squeezin',
A girl who has good sense will have to listen to reason,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Oh, what a time the married men will have, I declare!
Their wives won't have a chance to have them watched way up there,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are we girls gonna do?

2. [BOY:] Boys, we've had it mighty tough.
Girls have fooled us long enough,
And we've let them go on and deceive us.
They want food and then besides,
They want nice long auto rides,
But just try and kiss them and they leave us.
After they get all they want, they walk home; they don't care,
But, girls, we soon will take you out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
Now just suppose he takes you flying o'er some ocean.
If he suggests a kiss, you'll have to second the motion,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Why, even boys who never in their whole lives were rude
Are bound to be affected by the high altitude,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

A lot of girls will scream: "You stop or out I will go,"
But if he doesn't stop, she'll stay when she looks below,
'Cause you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?


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Subject: Lyr Add: YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 08:17 AM

My transcription from the recording at YouTube:

YOU CAN'T WALK BACK FROM AN AEROPLANE (SO WHAT ARE YOU GIRLS GONNA DO?)
As sung by Billy Jones and Ernest Hare (The Happiness Boys) on Columbia 1141-D, recorded Sept. 28, 1927.

1. Bill, we've had it mighty tough.
Girls have fooled us long enough,
And we've let 'em go on and deceive us. (They sure have fooled us!)
They want food and then besides,
They want nice long auto rides,
But try and kiss 'em and they up and leave us.
After they get all they want, they walk home; they don't care,
But, girls, we soon will take you out a-riding through the air—

CHORUS 1: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
When all those future Lucky Lindys want some squeezin',
A girl who has good sense will have to listen to reason,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
Gee, what a time the married men will have, I declare!
Their wives won't have a chance to have them watched way up there,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

2. Girlies, take this good advice.
Think it over once or twice.
Keep it in your mind and don't forget it. (It's good advice, girls.)
Now, start today and just prepare
For your joy-ride through the air.
If you don't, you surely will regret it.
Now, when you're miles high in the sky, the fellows are the kings,
So if you want to be sweet angels, start in growing wings—

CHORUS 2: For you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
For as you climb up to the sky, you'll have to start in spooning.
Oh, me, oh, my! He'll make you sigh for real honeymooning,
For there's air, air ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true;
And if a girl should fear that anything might go wrong,
For safety's sake, you'd better take a preacher along,
For you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?

CHORUS 3: And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?
When he begins to loop-the-loop and starts to do a glider,
There's not a single girl who'll have a conscience to guide her,
For there's air (air), air (air) ev'rywhere,
And not a drop to walk on; it's true.
I know some girls will scream: "You stop, or out I will go!"
But if he doesn't stop, she'll stay when she looks below,
And you can't walk back from an aeroplane,
So what are you girls gonna do?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Songs of The Happiness Boys/Jones & Hare
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Oct 15 - 04:03 PM

It's Sunkist kisses the sun, as in the citrus brand.


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