Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn

DigiTrad:
THE BOYS OF MULLACHBAWN


Related thread:
Lyr Req: Mollabon? / Boys of Mullaghbawn (4) (closed)


Susanne (skw) 13 Dec 99 - 06:38 PM
13 Dec 99 - 06:47 PM
John Nolan 14 Dec 99 - 08:04 AM
Susanne (skw) 16 Dec 99 - 06:36 PM
John Moulden 26 Dec 99 - 05:14 PM
Susanne (skw) 26 Dec 99 - 05:17 PM
mrsmac 13 Apr 06 - 02:48 PM
Stewart 13 Apr 06 - 06:01 PM
Betsy 04 Sep 11 - 03:37 PM
GUEST,999 05 Sep 11 - 01:55 AM
GUEST,Liberty Boy (sans cookie) 05 Sep 11 - 03:29 AM
Betsy 05 Sep 11 - 05:27 PM
GUEST,999 06 Sep 11 - 01:52 PM
GUEST,999 06 Sep 11 - 02:00 PM
Liberty Boy 07 Sep 11 - 01:02 AM
Dennis the Elder 07 Sep 11 - 06:31 AM
GUEST,999 07 Sep 11 - 06:33 AM
GUEST,mrsmac 07 Sep 11 - 08:18 AM
Liberty Boy 07 Sep 11 - 03:24 PM
Jim Carroll 08 Sep 11 - 12:55 PM
Betsy 08 Sep 11 - 03:31 PM
GUEST,ROBBIE BUTLER 13 Jul 18 - 09:58 PM
Joe Offer 14 Jul 18 - 07:35 PM
mayomick 16 Jul 18 - 05:57 PM
GUEST,Peter Laban 17 Jul 18 - 04:12 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Jul 18 - 09:29 AM
mayomick 17 Jul 18 - 01:00 PM
GUEST,Peter Laban 17 Jul 18 - 02:44 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Lyr Add: BOYS OF MULLAGHBAWN
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 06:38 PM

The only version of this song I know is the one by Len Graham of Skylark. It has one more verse than the version in the DT (verse 2 below), and there are two place-names I can't make out. Can anyone supply them, perhaps, and also some more background over and above what's in the DT and in Skylark's sleevenotes?

[1992:] Mullaghbawn is a mountainy parish in South Armagh and this is one of the few songs in Ireland which praises a landlord! It dates from the latter part of the 18th century, an era of absentee landlordism, but Richard Jackson, a local squire, lived on his estate, tilled his land and encouraged his tenants to do the same. In his will he provided for the poorest and oldest of his tenants and to this day people in the district benefit from his bequests. It is thought that the 'heroes' mentioned in the song were taking part in the Rising of 1798. (Notes Skylark, 'Light and Shade')

On a Monday morning early my wandering steps they'd lead me
Down by a farmer's station, through meadows and green lawn
I heard great lamentation, the small birds they were warbling
We'll have no more engagements with the boys of Mullaghbawn

I beg your pardon, ladies, but grant me this one favour
I hope it is no treason on you I now must call
I'm condoling late and early, my heart is near to breaking
All for a noble lady that lives near to Fennay (??)

Squire Jackson he's unequalled for honour and for reason
He never turned traitor nor betrayed the rights of man
But now we are in danger from a vile deceiving stranger
Who has ordered transportation for the boys of Mullaghbawn

As our heroes crossed the ocean I'm told the ship in motion
Did stand in great commotion as if the seas ran dry
With the trout and salmon gaping the cuckoo has left her station
Farewell to old Killebigh(??) and the hills of Mullaghbawn

To end my lamentation we're all in consternation
For want of education I here must end my song
Who cares for recreation without consideration
We're sent for transportation from the hills of Mullaghbawn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From:
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 06:47 PM

O Lochlainn's 'More Irish Street Ballads' has Mullabawn where you have Fennay(??) [and Mullabawn throughout]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: John Nolan
Date: 14 Dec 99 - 08:04 AM

The last line of verse 4 from Kevin Mitchell's version (Topic 1977)is: "Saying, we'll have no more engagement with the boys of Mullaghbawn." This neatly avoids the place-name issue. A great song, incidentally, Suzanne, with words "wedded to one of the most beautiful airs ever known," according to John Moulden's sleeve notes. Moulden also suggests that the second last line of verse 5 - "And without hesitation, we are charged with combination" - may refer to membership of an early trade union, outlawed by Pitt's Combination Act of 1800.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 06:36 PM

Thanks, John and Anon. I didn't know Kevin Mitchell had made an earlier recording. I've got his 1997? CD - very nice too.
However, I'm still looking for more backgroudn info and for the location and correct spelling of those two places. - Susanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: John Moulden
Date: 26 Dec 99 - 05:14 PM

Killeavey is the Parish next to, or next to next to Mullaghbawn. Len sings that the noble lady lived in Finnae (The same place on the County Cavan border of Westmeath as presumably gave rise to the song The Flower of Finae.) I don't know what the connection is. The Jacksons referred to above had connection is Monaghan.

Nicholas Hughes, whose recording made for the BBC some time in the fifties, was Len's source for this song was local to Mullaghbawn and to my mind the best local performer recorded at that time - he had songs of high quality too. Sean O'Boyle reported of him however that he had confided that there was no tune to the Boyus of Mullaghbawn it was he said "just sung by brute force."

Len Graham himself lives in half of the old Police Barrack at Glendesha, Mullaghbawn. The building may be old enough to be implicated in the song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 26 Dec 99 - 05:17 PM

Thanks, John! I was hoping you'd turn up in this thread. - Happy new year, Susanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: mrsmac
Date: 13 Apr 06 - 02:48 PM

There is another verse for this song and it fits between the third and fourth verse quoted already in this thread. I learned it from a tape made in Ennis 1977 and always assumed that it was part of the original song until i sang it one night and Seamus MacMathuna told me that he had written it.. so there you go!

its;

For roving or for rambling for sporting or for gambling
there's none could equal Francheen young Neil or gallant John
But those harsh oppressive landlords most cruelly they have acted
they've sent our lads in transport from the hills of mullaghbawn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Help: Boys of Mullaghbawn
From: Stewart
Date: 13 Apr 06 - 06:01 PM

Two versions, one by Mary Smith, the other by Aidan Brennan on Cantaria . Both very nice to listen to.

Cheers, S. in Seattle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Betsy
Date: 04 Sep 11 - 03:37 PM

A mate of mine Dave asked me a question and it was miles outside of my knowledge can anyone help ?
Dave wrote... "My Dad's late cousin Tommy Mackin told me that there are are about 4 variations of the song The Boys Of Mullaghbawn and each tells a drastically different story. The Christy Moore one is all about the local lads being deported to Australia for poaching/treason. Its the other variants of the song I'm after and the story behind them.
Tommy has sadly died and I can't find any more about them ".
I told Dave - I'll pass the matter on to the font of all knowledge in these matters ( I'm sure he doesn't know of the Mudacat) so do your best for Dave, an I shall send him the link to this message so he can monitor the replies.
Thanks in advance for all your help.

Betsy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,999
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 01:55 AM

from a google of   

The Boys of Mullaghbawn (traditional Irish) | Cantaria Folk Song ...

Good site btw with info about this version of the song.

On a Monday morning early
As my wand'ring steps did lead me,
Down by a farmer's station,
Of meadow and green lawn,
I heard great lamentation
That the wee birds they were makin'
Sayin' "We'll have no more engagements
With the boys of Mullaghbawn."

[additional verse from the singing of Len Graham]
I beg your pardon ladies
I ask you this one favor
I hope it is no treason
From you I now must go
I'm condoling late and early
My heart is nie for breaking
All for a noble lady
That lives near Mullaghbawn

Squire Jackson was unequaled
For honour or for reason,
He never turned a traitor
Or betrayed the rights of man,
But now we are endangered
By a vile deceiving stranger
Who has ordered deportation
For the Boys of Mullaghbawn.

As those heroes crossed the ocean
I'm told the ship in motion
Did stand in wild commotion
As if the seas ran dry,
The trout and salmon gaping
As the cuckoo left her station
Sayin', "Farewell to lovely Erin
And the hills of Mullaghbawn.

To end my lamentation
We are all in consternation
For the want of education
I here must end my song;
None cares for recreation
Since without consideration
We are sent for transportation
From the hills of Mullaghbawn.

[ALT:]
To end my lamentation
We are all in consternation
None cares for recreation
Until the day do dawn
For without hesitation
We are charged with combination
And sent for transportation
From the hills of Mullaghbawn.

Repeat first verse, but end with:
Sayin', "Farewell to lovely Erin
And the hills of Mullaghbawn.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,Liberty Boy (sans cookie)
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 03:29 AM

The version, with the variants, as above is the only version I know. Séamus Mac Mathúna composed some extra verses, which some people sing. The people of Mullaghbawn, Michael Ned Quinn, Patricia Flynn et al sing the version above. It was printed in Colm O Lochlainn's "Irish Street Ballads".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Betsy
Date: 05 Sep 11 - 05:27 PM

Thanks Liberty Boy and 999 I hope Dave is being helped .
Cheers

Betsy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,999
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 01:52 PM

This version is stunningly beautiful.

WOW!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,999
Date: 06 Sep 11 - 02:00 PM

Moore's version.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Liberty Boy
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 01:02 AM

Christy's version is better by a country mile!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 06:31 AM

Both versions have their beauty.
I've been on youtube and listened to others also.
Great song, worth learning, not quite sure how I will sing it, apart from badly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,999
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 06:33 AM

Well, preferences aside, at least we can share in the recognition of a great song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,mrsmac
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 08:18 AM

For rovin' or for ramblin'
For sportin' or for gamblin'
There's none could equal Francheen(?)
young Neil or gallant John
But those harsh oppressive landlords
how cruelly they have acted
they've sent our lads in transport
from the hills of Mullaghbawn

This verse was written by Seamus MacMathuna - and is sung by me


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Liberty Boy
Date: 07 Sep 11 - 03:24 PM

And you're welcome to do so mrsmac!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 12:55 PM

There's a fascinating 8 page chapter on the song, entitled 'The Boys of Mullabawn - Secret societies in South Armagh, Banishment to Australia' in a handy-to-have little book called 'One Green Hill' - Journeys Through Irish song' by John McLaughlin.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Betsy
Date: 08 Sep 11 - 03:31 PM

A big Thankyou to everyone . Dave is fascinated by the depth and variety of replies - as usual ( in my experience ) a font of all knowledge in our type of music .
I have also asked him to sign up ( and would advise others to do so ) -it isn't an long or intrusive process and no need to remember yet another PIN No. or Password and no embarrassing personal details to impart .
Many thanks thanks again - you're all so helpful and it's truly refreshing in these days of me ! me! me !. United we stand
Cheers
Betsy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,ROBBIE BUTLER
Date: 13 Jul 18 - 09:58 PM

SUCH INTERESTING BACKGROUND INFO ON A WONDERFULL BALLAD. I HQVE SANG IT MANY TIMES AND EVERYONE WHO HEARD IT LOVED THE WORDS AND THE MAGICAL AIR TO THE SONG......THANKS FOR SHARING IT.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Joe Offer
Date: 14 Jul 18 - 07:35 PM

Boys of Mullabawn, The

DESCRIPTION: "A vile deceiving stranger ... has ordered transportation for the boys of Mullabawn." The women lament and "without hesitation, we are charged with combination And sent for transportation from the hills of Mullabawn"
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1925 (Hayward-Ulster); c.1867 (broadside, Bodleian 2806 b.9(265))
KEYWORDS: farming transportation Ireland political
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (4 citations):
OLochlainn-More 56, "The Boys of Mullabawn" (1 text, 1 tune)
Moylan 42, "The Boys of Mullaghbawn" (1 text, 1 tune)
Hayward-Ulster, pp. 26-27, "The Boys of Mullabawn" (1 text)
OBoyle 6, "Boys of Mullaghbawn" (1 text, 1 tune)

Roud #2362
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, 2806 b.9(265), "The Boys of Mullaghbawn," W. Birmingham (Dublin), c.1867; also 2806 c.15(180), Harding B 19(40), "The Boys of Mullaghbawn"
NOTES [125 words]: OLochlainn-More: "This song records a real happening during the last quarter of the eighteenth century, the transportation of peasant farmers for some agrarian offence at Mullaghbawn near Newry, Co. Armagh. (See F. J. Bigger: The Ulster Land War.)"
Moylan: "This song could be about Defenderism or United Irishmen or, according to one theory, the transportation of men who had attempted to abduct an heiress, an activity for which clubs existed in 18th-century Ireland. It is set in the heart of Defender country in south Armagh, but local tradition associates the song with the United Irishmen." At the end of the eighteenth century the Catholic "Defenders" were opposed to the Protestant "Peep o'Day Boys" or "Orangemen" (source: Zimmermann). - BS
File: LcMullB

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2018 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Here's what we have in the Digital Tradition. Where is this version from?

THE BOYS OF MULLACHBAWN (from DT)

On a Monday morning early
As my wand'ring steps did lead me,
Down by a farmer's station,
Of meadow and green lawn,
I heard great lamentation
That the wee birds they were makin'
Sayin' "We'll have no more engagements
With the boys of Mullaghbawn."

Squire Jackson was un equalled
For honour or for reason,
He never turned a traitor
Or betrayed the rights of man,
But now we are endangered
By a vile deceiving stranger
Who has ordered deportation
For the Boys of Mullachbawn.

As those heroes crossed the ocean
I'm told the ship in motion
Did stand in wild commotion
As if the seas ran dry,
The trout and salmon gaping
As the cuckoo left her station
Sayin', "Farewell to lovely Erin
And the hills of Mullaghbawn.

To end my lamentation
We are all in consternation
For the want of education
I here must end my song;
None cares for recreation
Since without consideration
We are sent for transportation
From the hills of Mullachbawn.

note:In 1787, Squire Jackson, the landlord of an estate which
included the parish of Mulluchbawn, died. His successor was less
popular. In 1781, several rebels were deported.
From The Irish Song Tradition, O'Boyle
Collected from Nicholas Hughes, Armagh
@Irish @transportation @rebel
filename[ MULLBAWN
TUNE FILE: MULLBAWN
CLICK TO PLAY
RG
apr97

  <P>

<a name=

Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: mayomick
Date: 16 Jul 18 - 05:57 PM

I'm sure that P.W. Joyce published it in 1910 - Joyce, P. W. Old Irish Folk Music and Songs. I don't have a copy to hand to check.
The word "cuckoo" should be capitalised: "As the Cuckoo left her station" ."The Cuckoo" was the name of the transportation ship according to Joyce .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 17 Jul 18 - 04:12 AM

It's in Joyce, p 206.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Jul 18 - 09:29 AM

Thanks Peter
This is Joyce's note to the song and this is a LINK to John Lyons' rendition of it along with my note
Jim Carroll

397. THE BOYS OF MULLAGHBAWN.
I obtained the air of this song from Mr. Patrick O’Leary of Graignamanagh, Co. Kilkenny, who himself got it from Mr. M. Nulty, National School teacher of Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan. An almost identical setting was sent to me b7 an unnamed correspondent in Dundalk. Coupling this with the song, we may take it that it is an Ulster melody.
The Mullaghbawn commemorated in this air and song is a mountain parish in the southern corner of the Co. Armagh, between Slieve Gullion and Forkhill. It is now remarkable for its prosperous native industries (described in “ Irish Rural Life and Industry,” 1907 : p. 170, by the editor, W. T. M.-F.) ; as it was formerly noted for its rural social amusements. Mr. W. T. Macartney-Filgate of Dublin, who knows Mullaghbawn well, has sent me two copies of the song, as well as some particulars regarding it; but I have since found, in my own collection, two other copies printed on ballad-sheets, which I had overlooked. It is all about a number of young men of Mullaghbawn who were either transported for some illegal practices (about 1798) or seized and sent on board ship, by a pressgang. The song is very characteristic of the Irish “ unlettered Muse."

No more engagements
Meaning that they (the exiles) could never again engage in the Mullaghbawn sports.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: mayomick
Date: 17 Jul 18 - 01:00 PM

Thanks Peter. I thought it was in the Joyce book that I saw the reference to the Cuckoo being the ship's name. It must have been somewhere else.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Boys Of Mullaghbawn
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 17 Jul 18 - 02:44 PM

I was just confirming it was in Joyce Mick, without further comment.

He does give :

'The trout and salmon gaping as the Cuckoo left the station' with a footnote the Cuckoo was the name of the vessel, so you were spot on.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 18 December 12:41 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.