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Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?

Cool Beans 17 Sep 11 - 02:21 PM
GUEST,999 17 Sep 11 - 02:49 PM
katlaughing 17 Sep 11 - 04:24 PM
Jack Campin 17 Sep 11 - 06:14 PM
olddude 17 Sep 11 - 06:32 PM
Melissa 17 Sep 11 - 06:55 PM
dick greenhaus 17 Sep 11 - 07:21 PM
jeffp 17 Sep 11 - 08:48 PM
Genie 17 Sep 11 - 09:11 PM
katlaughing 17 Sep 11 - 09:38 PM
Melissa 17 Sep 11 - 10:29 PM
Cool Beans 17 Sep 11 - 11:35 PM
Jack Campin 18 Sep 11 - 06:16 AM
Richard Bridge 18 Sep 11 - 04:50 PM
GUEST,999 18 Sep 11 - 09:37 PM
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Subject: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Cool Beans
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 02:21 PM

Left index finger sore from playing too many one-finger A chords. Got a gig tonight. Tylenol or Aleve? Or something else? Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 02:49 PM

"Analgesics

Analgesics are medications used to relieve pain without reducing the consciousness of the patient. They work by reducing the amount of pain felt and this is generally achieved by interfering with the way the pain message is transmitted by the nerves. Analgesics will not treat the cause of the pain but they will provide temporary relief from pain symptoms.

There are three main categories of analgesics. The first is the opioid analgesics which are prescription only medicines that are very potent, being chemically related to morphine. The second is the non-opioid analgesics. Non-opioid analgesics work by affecting the prostaglandin system, which is the system within the body responsible for producing pain. This category includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, such as Aspirin, ketoprofen and ibuprofen. The last category is adjuvant analgesics, which are medicines typically used for purposes other than pain relief. This includes some antidepressants that may also help to relieve pain in specific circumstances.

It is the second of these three categories of analgesic that is the focus of this website. They are over-the-counter drugs that are can be safely used provided that the recommended dosage restrictions are observed. They are non-habit forming and have an effective ceiling, at which point the patient will derive no further benefit from increasing the dosage.

Non-opioid analgesics act peripherally and not centrally like opioids that depress the central nervous system (CNS) and inhibit the brain's ability to feel pain. Non-opioid analgesics target the chemical substances released by the brain in response to injury that facilitate the transmission of the pain stimuli to the brain. The most prevalent of these chemical mediators is prostaglandin. Non-opioid NSAIDs are effective because they serve to block the release of prostaglandin at the peripheral nerve sites.

Prostaglandins serve a variety of regulatory functions within the body. One of these functions is to assist the transmission of pain signals to the brain so that you are readily alerted that damage or dysfunction has occurred within the body. Other prostaglandin actions include the regulating body temperature, inflammation, the elasticity of blood vessels and the contraction of smooth muscle tissue.

When damage occurs to the body, prostaglandins are formed from the unsaturated fatty acids released by damaged cells. Prostaglandins contain an enzyme called cyclo-oxygenase (COX). Prostaglandin synthetase amplifies the amount of pain experienced by serving as a pain activator. They increase the sensitivity of the nerves to pain impulses. By reducing the synthesis of prostaglandin the amount of pain stimuli sent to the brain is correspondingly reduced.

Analgesics like paracetamol and codeine mostly affect the central nervous system (CNS) while NSAIDs like ibuprofen and aspirin are more effective near the actually site of the pain, exerting their analgesic effect in the periphery. Codeine works on the CNS as a weak opiate agonist that inhibits pain signals so that less pain is felt. Codeine achieves this by binding with receptors at various sites in the CNS to alter the chemical process that stimulates pain signals. Paracetamol is a weak prostaglandin inhibitor that blocks prostaglandin biosynthesis in the CNS.

NSAIDs like Aspirin, ibuprofen, diclofenac, and ketoprofen block the pain impulse at the source of the pain. They work by hindering the body's ability to biosynthesise prostaglandin by adhering to the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) that controls the amount of prostaglandin produced by the immune system. The special nerve endings that transmit the pain message are sensitised to prostaglandin so, by restricting its presence, the pain message."


Please note that the writer of that brief essay uses the word actually when s/he should have used actual. That aside, if you intend to have any alcohol, avoid stuff with acetaminophen. They are contraindicated.

Hope it's a great show.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: katlaughing
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 04:24 PM

If you have any salve or tincture, such as Tiger Balm, Ben-Gay, Sombra, or Bio-Freeze, it will help with the pain, BUT, as you probably know, playing when it is already sore may cause a much worse problem unless you get it rested, use mild exercises to loosen the tendons, etc. I take Tylenol, but not often and have been being treated for severe tendinitis in both index fingers since June. Be as kind as possible to yourself. Good luck!


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Jack Campin
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 06:14 PM

In the UK you can get ibuprofen (what you're calling Aleve, I think) in gel form - you can just slap it on to the affected joint. That's much more effective with less side-effects. Another anti-inflammatory you get in the same form is diclofenac. I don't think these gels are approved in the US but you might get lucky in Canada (that's where you live, I think?)

Paracetamol/acetaminophen/Tylenol has essentially no anti-inflammatory action, it only works against pain. Probably not much use in your case, and may even be counterproductive.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: olddude
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 06:32 PM

depends on your gut, Tylenol is gentle .. Aleve will keep me on the pot all day. (chrons) doesn't like nsaids much. if you have any stomach or intestinal problem then tylenol is the only choic


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Melissa
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 06:55 PM

That fake skin stuff puts a protective coat over tender spots and seems to sort of soothe pressure/friction discomfort.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 07:21 PM

alternative fingerings help


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: jeffp
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 08:48 PM

If you have kidney problems, stay away from NSAIDs. This on advice from my urologist.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Genie
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 09:11 PM

Alternative fingerings may help but they're unlikely to be a solution for a gig that's imminent, unless you're already proficient in doing your set in those tunings.

BTW, Alleve is naproxen sodium, not ibuprofen.   

Acetominophen (Tylenol) is not good for long term use because it builds up in your system and can damage the liver (especially if you also consume alcohol fairly often).   It's not just that they shouldn't be taken at the same time; if you are a moderate (or heavier) drinker, I'd stay away from acetominophen for the most part because it is not flushed out of your body the way NSAIDS are.

So if you're concerned about your kidneys and your liver, the topical treatments and stretching exercises are probably best.

But most of us can tolerate certain meds on an "emergency" basis that we couldn't handle as routine meds.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: katlaughing
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 09:38 PM

The hand therapist I've been going to just told me about TENS which is supposed to help with the pain as it gives your body something else to concentrate on and releases endorphins which help also. I am going to see the doc on Monday and intend to ask him about getting a unit. Apparently they are patches you stick on which are attached to a small electrical unit which can be set to different pulses. I see in a quick search there are conflicting reports as to its efficacy, but I trust the pro I've been going to and intend to give it a try.

I cannot take NSAIDs and usually do take one regular strength tylenol per night. But, the tinctures and stretches will, in time, slacken the need for that, I hope.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Melissa
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 10:29 PM

hemorrhoid ointment is an anesthetic topical..it would probably be pretty good for the sore side of an overworked chordfinger


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Cool Beans
Date: 17 Sep 11 - 11:35 PM

Two ibuprofens did the trick. Thanks, all.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Sep 11 - 06:16 AM

There is increasing evidence that long-term use of ibuprofen is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke. Using it as a topical gel lowers that risk since you're delivering more of the drug to the inflamed area and much less to the whole body.

Treating the pain without reducing the inflammation will worsen the damage, so TENS machines and anaesthetics are exactly what you don't want.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 18 Sep 11 - 04:50 PM

Long term, change to a 2 or 3 finger A. If you have big fingers tuck the first finger in behind the other two on the A note. Or unless you need to reach for the E and A on the top two strings if doing a one-string A use the little finger. It's always bendier.


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Subject: RE: Sore finger. Tylenol or Aleve?
From: GUEST,999
Date: 18 Sep 11 - 09:37 PM

I'm happy the gig went well, CB.


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