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BS: Birdwatching 2012

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Raptor 01 Jan 12 - 09:04 PM
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maeve 02 Jan 12 - 10:53 AM
Janie 03 Jan 12 - 06:21 PM
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clueless don 04 Jan 12 - 09:14 AM
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lefthanded guitar 06 Jan 12 - 01:36 PM
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My guru always said 07 Jun 12 - 10:41 AM
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Subject: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 01 Jan 12 - 08:59 PM

Here we go again Happy birding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 01 Jan 12 - 09:04 PM

Start today, Count Speices that you see at your house or yard. See how many you get in 2012. Only from your house or a 100 foot radius from your property.
Who's in?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jan 12 - 09:42 PM

Yes!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Wolfhound person
Date: 02 Jan 12 - 10:41 AM

Large male pheasant sitting on front lawn - to dogs' annoyance!

Paws


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 02 Jan 12 - 10:53 AM

I'll join in.

Wild turkeys strewn across the apple orchard.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 03 Jan 12 - 06:21 PM

I abandoned my birds this summer so the vast majority of them abandoned me - but we finally have cold weather and the feeders are full again....


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Little Hawk
Date: 03 Jan 12 - 07:09 PM

I've got a big flock of House Finches swarming my feeders, going through the Niger like there's no tomorrow.

Unfortunately, one of then killed himself on the patio door window today. I have to put up some of those little window warning stickers ASAP.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 03 Jan 12 - 10:02 PM

LH, we found deer fencing to be far more effective...hung over the outside of the window.http://www.deerxlandscape.com/cgi-bin/webc.cgi/st_main.html?p_catid=8


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: clueless don
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 09:14 AM

Had a nice moment running in my local woodland park. I saw a Hairy Woodpecker on a tree, and as I watched it, a bunch of other birds flew past, including a Pileated Woodpecker. Cool.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Rusty Dobro
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 09:55 AM

Lesser spotted woodpecker is the highlight so far, but also good to see that greenfinches are back after several months away. Large flock of waxwings elsewhere in the village, but haven't reached my garden yet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 04 Jan 12 - 02:26 PM

Doesn't sound too interesting, but there's a large group of hedge sparrows beside the village shop, in a hedge (of course) These little birds were so common in my childhood, but now they're not so numerous, so I was pleased to see them. They have a distinctive chirp, and dart in and out of their privet hedge to eat bread in the shopkeeper's garden. Have now about ten goldfinches all waiting their turn to perch on our hanging feeder. They seem to adore sunflower hearts just as much as nijer seeds. (Good, as the latter are expensive!)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 02:00 PM

I made up a suet cake of mixed seed and bacon fat. It seems more popular than the commercial ones that I have hanging out, especially with downy woodpeckers and bluejays.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jan 12 - 08:54 PM

Do birds we can hear but can't see count? I often hear Screech Owls and Barred Owls. Occasionally a see a large owl glide through my yard at night but of course can't see well enough to make a visual identification. Likely candidate is a Barred Owl since I hear them call fairly often.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Little Hawk
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 12:33 AM

I got a device to keep the birdbath from freezing, so the birds always have fresh water out there. It was a huge hit! I looked out today and there were about a dozen house finches drinking from the birdbath and about 30 more at the feeders.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 07:34 AM

One problem with not yet being retired is that I leave the house in the dark and return in the dark on week days and so get to see very little! However, I was off ill yesterday and could watch the Kestrel hovering over the next field. It's amazing, the ability to remain so still in mid-air in the blustery conditions with gusts that must have been over 60 mph.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 09:39 AM

In view of the recent cold snap, we have begun putting out oats on our porch again. the slate colored juncos have returned.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,999
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 11:12 AM

Southern Quebec

Two cardinals (m+f)
Two dozen or so hedge sparrows (dunnocks)
Two nuthatches (only bird I ever saw walk down a three trunk)
Hairy woodpecker
Downy woodpecker
Mountain chickadees (I think three)
Black cap chickadees (half dozen or so)
Mourning doves (two)
Pileated woodpecker (nearby)
Starlings (lots but only from time to time)
Bluejays (a few)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 12:01 PM

What super names your birds seem to have:- slate coloured juncos, hairy woodpecker, downy woodpecker and pileated woodpecker, (lots of different hairinesses there!) chickadees etc. Makes my poor little 'hedge sparrows' sound rather ordinary!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,olddude
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 12:05 PM

A beautiful red tailed hawk every morning next to the grapevines. Big guy, they have to be my favorite bird for sure


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 01:28 PM

Yes hearing them counts if you are sure you know which ones they are.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 01:36 PM

The state bird of New York City.....pigeons, pigeons, nuthin' but pigeons.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 06 Jan 12 - 08:13 PM

I'm jealous, Bruce.

Pileated woodpeckers are one of my favorite birds. They were common in the hills and woods of West Virginia, but are very rare here on the Piedmont of NC. In the nearly 26 years I've lived here, I have seen none and heard one on the Piedmont. There is a housing development on top of the low mountain behind my mother's house in the suburban area of West Virginia where my mother lives and I was raised. Until it went in about 10 years ago, I would sometimes break away from family and climb up into the woods when I was visiting just to sit in the mature woods on the slope to watch and listen for them.

In West Virginia, we sometimes called them Ginseng birds. Ginseng and Pileated's like the same habitat, and in some Native American cultures they are thought of as guardian spirits of the ginseng. We often would hear and see them flashing through the woods when out hunting for ginseng or planting ginseng seeds, in West Virginia and in the mountains here in North Carolina. I particularly miss hearing their calls. Every now and then I'll hear a Flicker and for an instant will actually feel my heart race with excitement until the brain kicks in. (tells you how exciting my life is, eh?) The call of the Flicker is just similar enough....


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Irene M
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 06:36 AM

I have to have two sunflower seed feeders to accommodate all the goldfinches, have greenfinches,sparrows, coal, blue and great tits, and a family of blackbirds. To my great delight I have a visiting bulfinch. The first I have ever seen. And of course there are the hangers-on. Pigeons and squirrels. Then there are the occasional visits from peregrines and my yard must be like McDonalds for sparrowhawks. This is in Derby, UK.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 07:09 AM

Oh those sparrowhawks! In my last house one used to zoom sideways past the feeders and seize a victim in his talons. All that was left was a sad little pile of feathers on the grass. I know they have to eat, but I used to get so upset. Here in this new house, the garden is a bit small for predators (I hope!)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Irene M
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 04:24 PM

Last spring I watched a juvenile sparrowhawk eating a sparrow in the back yard. Once it had taken it up on the fence, the other birds resumed feeding as if to say "It's OK. He's busy."
You always know when there is a sparrowhawk or peregrine about, as you wouldn't think small birds existed! Normal activity (spitting sunflower seeds on the ground) is suspended.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 06:00 PM

Not fair. Some people have much larger properties than others. Let's determine the size of the largest property being surveyed in this discussion and allow everyone to survey that size of area too? ;-)

Since January 1st within the confines of the fences around my tiny yard, I've seen only Dark-eyed Juncos, Black-capped Chickadees, House Finches, House Sparrows, Crows, Common Redpolls.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Jeri
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 09:24 PM

I'm in, but I always get the same birds. (I doubt the eagle will pay another visit--that was a rare pleasure.)
I did see juncos this year, and they've been elsewhere for year or two.
Got black-capped chickadees, tifted tutmice, cardinals, gold finches, bluejays, house sparrows, both hairy and downy woodpeckers, white-breasted nuthatches, mourning doves, crows, and an occasional cold-weather herd of American robins. That's just the every-day visitors.

In the fall, I bought a new feeder system that consists of a pole and any number of things you can add on. I got the bird habit bad!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 10:04 PM

Not to worry, ragdall. It's not a competition. It's about observing habitat. Whether we live on large farms or in condos with a balcony and patio, most of our birdwatching occurs while looking out a window or sitting on a balcony or patio. I have an average sized lot for being in a small town in North Carolina. The birds I see are not a function of lot-size, but of habitat. The habitat surrounding where I live is conducive to supporting a number of species universally common at feeders in urban and suburban areas. Those species are no less interesting because they are common. I observed many more species of birds from my prior house and lot, which was about half the size of this lot. While that was in part because the immediate habitat of the yard was different and more varied, even though the lot was smaller. I also see one or two species here that I never saw at the other house. While the yard habitat was one factor in seeing more species at the old house, the greater variety of surrounding habitat, including a river and greenway within 1/2 mile of the other place made a difference.

If I were to move 3/4 mile north of here into some condos and townhomes with only a balcony or patio, I would see more species than I see here. That complex is backed by several acres of woods approaching mature size. In addition, it is situated along a flight path between the town's water reservoir and a pond on a golf course community. That would allow me to observe Great Blue Herons, red-wing blackbirds, assorted ducks and Canada Geese as they fly between water resources that I never see from any point in my yard.

I really like the way keeping my annual birdlist helps me think about environment and habitat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: rumanci
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 10:06 PM

hey jeri
I bet tifted tutmice are the rarest birds on the list
rum


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 07 Jan 12 - 10:57 PM

You could keep a list of birds you see at any particular habitat or locale where you spend time - not just "home." Only keep them separate to help maintain awareness of habitat.

I used to work just 4 long blocks from where I lived. I walked to work. I never saw a rock pigeon, house sparrow or starling from my yard, but saw them every day from either my office window or the fire escape of my office.

I now have a 40 mile one way commute - all two lane roads through farm country. It is rare that I do not see a Great Blue Heron winging its way between farm ponds, or a wedge of Canada Geese, or a couple of mallards, or, in spring, red-winged blackbirds among the cat-tails around farm ponds. In the fall harvested grain and cornfields will be full of Canada Geese gleaning what they can. I never hear a whippoorwill or poor=will or other goshawk here. When I lived just 20 miles north in a travel trailer on a 250 acre farm, they would drive me crazy at night with their loud and persistent calls. Indigo Buntings were common there, as were fox sparrows, rufus-sided towhees, brown thrashers. I occasionally see some of those species here in my yard, but not often.   Also saw a larger variety of hawks. Here I see only the common Red-tailed and Sharp-shinned Hawks. Once saw a large flock of Cedar Waxwings migrating swoop down and quickly strip a cedar of it's blue berries, then take to the skies again - only time in my life I have seen that species.

If I drive 1 mile north or south I land in the parking lot of the shopping centers where I do most of my grocery shopping. There will be house sparrows and rock pigeons at both places, as well, in season, purple martins, killdeer, and after a coastal storm, seagulls. It will be nothing but a fluke if ever I see any them ib my yard or on my feeders.

Habitat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 06:52 AM

From my kitchen window I can watch the ordinary little birds feeding on our offerings, and even though there's nothing spectacular out there (as I used to see when I had half an acre of land) it's still very interesting. You get to know the more dominant ones, the skinnier, hungry ones, and the starlings are so comical. I've also noticed that each type of bird has its special time for appearing. You could set your clock by them! I also like to watch the communal bird-bathing. Five starlings sit on the rim, then as if they've counted "One, two, three!" they all jump in together. As for the spectacular, we occasionally get wild swans flying over in pairs, an exquisitely beautiful sight which brings tears to my eyes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 02:09 PM

The Bluebirds are back!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 11:19 PM

Starlings and pidgeons have a system at my feeders. The pidgeons wait on the power line ( crapping everywhere) until the starling flock attacks my feeders spitting most of the mixture on the ground. The pidgeons then descend and gorge on the spoils, only to return to the overhead wires to crap and wait for the starlings return. I know pidgeons have to eat but like bad relatives they refuse to leave! I know that the dove is a symbol of peace but sometimes this part of the family makes me feel like declaring war! As for the starlings they are rather ignorant guests with very poor table manners. The chickadee and the finch are polite and wait their turn and are more welcome and friendly. The bluejays are plentiful and a beautiful bird that the starlings will not mess with, and I love watching the woodpeckers. My neighbours have cats who skulk around but I don't think that they catch much and they keep the mice and squirrels at bay


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 12:51 AM

Watching the learning curve for birds. Starlings, even just a couple of them,in winter and grackles in summer can easily gobble up a suet cake a day in my yard. I bought a caged suet feeder this year that allows smaller birds in but excludes the starlings.    the Carolina wrens do not hesitate to go through the cage to the suet. The Bluebirds, appear to have a "wait and see attitude.

Sandy, I broadcast a bit of millet seed on the ground for assorted sparrows but in my seed feeders i serve only black-oil sunflower seeds to deter starlings. Starlings have weak beaks and can not shell sunflower seeds, so leave my seed feeders alone.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 06:28 AM

I often see hawks and occasionally shrikes in the trees across the street, but never in my yard. Flocks of Bohemian waxwings are feeding on Rowan berries over there too, having already picked my trees clean several months ago. Unfortunately, that's beyond the 100 foot limit from my property line. (schniff) (schniff) (Whine)

A male intergrade Northern Flicker spent quite a bit of time in my garden today. He hung on the side of a cherry snag, in the rain, blinking.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/diffuse/6666221099/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/diffuse/6666221727/

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 09:21 AM

A feeding tip: Go to your butcher and ask him to keep some of the fat he trims off the beef(should be free). you can present it in a wire mesh feeder. Cheeper than suet cakes.
I think I'll start a bird feeding thread for these tips.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 11:51 AM

Great Shots Ragdall


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Pete Jennings
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 01:00 PM

Pair of swans swam past on the canal this morning, a pretty regular sight.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 01:25 PM

Oh Pete, I do so love seeing swans. We live near a chain of lakes and small rivers, so water fowl are all around. The honking of wild geese and ducks is such an evocative sound at early dawn.
I buy large packs of lard (very cheap), melt some and throw in any scraps, a few porridge oats, catfood leavings, bits of fat, dried fruit, crumbs etc. I then pour it into small aluminium cases (like those you get takeaways in) They go in the fridge until hard, then my husband puts one in the feeder every two or three days days. I then refill the cases. I put sunflower hearts in a special feeder for the goldfinches and tits. We put scraps on the ground too for other kinds of birds. I know it encourages rats etc but I reckon my three Siamese will see to that. Funnily enough (thank goodness) they don't chase the birds here as they did in my last house, probably because there's no cover for them to hide and stalk.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 01:36 PM

Thanks Janie and Rap for the tips. I have wondered why the starlings throw the sunflower seeds away, when they are the first choice of the chickadees. Now I know.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Irene M
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 03:06 PM

Fantastic photos. Thanks Rags.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Jeri
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 03:49 PM

Me too: beautiful shots! It may just be me, but photos of a flicker on Flickr strike me as funny.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 04:07 PM

rags' pics of birds have AMAZED me for years. Seriously AMAZING photography.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 10:24 PM

rag's - what gnu said!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 10 Jan 12 - 04:31 AM

aw, gawrsh. I just point the camera and push the button. The camera makes the pictures.

Jeri, flickers on Flickr strike many people as funny.

Today I was visited by a flock of about 50 redpolls who investigated every feeder and eagerly combed the ground for seeds that had fallen from the hanging feeders, House Finches, who seem to be traveling with the redpolls, helped themselves to black oil sunflower seed in the squirrel's feeder, and an American Crow braced itself against the wind to warm its feet on my gas furnace vent high above the roof.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: rumanci
Date: 10 Jan 12 - 10:35 AM

you do far more than that rags - truly beautiful. I've never seen those birds before. Thankyou.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: freda underhill
Date: 11 Jan 12 - 05:44 AM

beautifikl pics, Ragdall!

here in inner Sydney we have a large garden (open garden, shared by 12 households). Last night I sat out the back with a neighbour, watched the sunset and listened to a
kookaburra
laughing in a nearby tree.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Little Hawk
Date: 11 Jan 12 - 08:29 AM

Wow, that's a really neat video of the Kookaburra!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 01:58 PM

So, Mum was working at the kitchen counter this AM and noticed a bird in her apple tree. At 30 feet, she needs binoculars. It was a large large (bluejays are much larger at -15C) with a peanut in it's mouth and it's head was bobbing up and down and from side to side. A smaller one was sitting on a branch just below and near it. This went on for a while.

Trying to bribe a female? Taunting a smaller jay?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 02:02 PM

This morning a great big gull hovered over our tiny garden, swooped in and flew off with a huge lump of old Christmas Pudding! (Will he come back for the brandy sauce?)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 07:37 PM

so cool, Freda. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 09:54 PM

Freda,
That video is fantastic! I can now see why they call it "laughing".


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 09:59 PM

Gnu,
That's interesting behaviour, maybe you'll see it again and be able to find out what is happening?

I've seen waxwings passing a berry back and forth in summer, but at -15 it's not likely it was a mating ritual.

Perhaps the jay was choking on the peanut, but the other bird wasn't able to apply a Heimlich Maneuver? ;-)

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 13 Jan 12 - 12:04 AM

Jay head bobbing is usually associated with mating behavior. I've seen it even in winter.

Here's a link to interesting historical notes on jay observations for your reading pleasure.http://birdsbybent.com/ch21-30/bluejay.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 13 Jan 12 - 04:15 PM

Yeah... that was my first question. Males of all (most) species will do anything to get laid. Even when it's minus BRRRRRR degrees. Worth a shot eh? But, just ONE peanut? and in the shell? Not much of a committment eh? Where's the ring, sailor?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 13 Jan 12 - 07:24 PM

He's learning technique, g. Give him time!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 13 Jan 12 - 07:38 PM

Well, his nuts will be stale by spring. >;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 13 Jan 12 - 07:43 PM

He'll keep 'em on ice until spring.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 20 Jan 12 - 06:44 PM

A flock of Bohemian Waxwings landed in the big Larch across the street yesterday. This is part of the flock. I couldn't get all of them into one shot without being so far away they wouldn't look like birds. The waxwings stayed for over an hour, picking berries from the Mountain Ash (Rowan), below the Larch and eating snow from the house roof.

A lone European Starling was feeding there today. It flew away before I could photograph it.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 20 Jan 12 - 07:50 PM

A female cardinal has joined the juncos on the porch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 04:44 PM

rags... stunning pics... yet again. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 04:47 PM

Ahhhh... what's the diff between a Bohemian Waxwing and a Cedar Waxwing?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 04:53 PM

gnu- You might enjoy this comparison between the two: http://10000birds.com/cedar-waxwing-vs-bohemian-waxwing.htm


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 05:57 PM

Great shots Ragdall


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 12:45 AM

At home, I've seen:

Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
Dark-eyed Junco [Junco hyemalis], Slate-colored and Gray-headed
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]

Elsewhere (all in Colorado), I'm up to 74 species for the year. The exciting ones were:

There has been a female Long-tailed Duck [Clangula hyemalis] spending the winter on (appropriately enough) "Duck Pond" in Denver's City Park.

An obviously mated and courting pair of Bald Eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus]. I've seen them three times in the same area. Quite obvious they're setting up household. Haven't seen the spectacular mating flight though. (Has anyone seen this scene in last fall's The Big Year?)

A pair of Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus] have been nesting somewhere in the wood behind my apartment building for several years. I hear them dueting regularly (though only once so far this year), but have never found their nest site. (Hint: Why is my Mudcat handle "NightWing"?)

One Snowy Owl [Bubo scandiacus] on a Christmas Bird Count before the year ended and another on a different CBC after this year started. This year's irruption of Snowy Owl is very exciting. There have been something like a dozen seen in Colorado this winter. Before this winter there had been ONE seen in Colorado for the past DECADE.

Northern Shrike [Lanius excubitor] Not terribly unusual, but for a small story. Last month I was trying very hard to break 200 species for the year. (JUUUUUUUUST made it; got my 200th species {Thayer's Gull} on 12/28.) I had figured that one of the best possibilities for those last two or three was Northern Shrike. Somehow I had not seen one all year. Couldn't find one and couldn't find one. Finally got a Shrike. It was (about) the 5th bird (not species, but individual) I saw on New Year's morning. *groan*

Walking in the hills just above Boulder, I left the trail and hiked up to the top of the ridge. Just as I reached the ridgetop, a flock of about a dozen Bushtit [Psaltriparus minimus] dropped down into a bush about a meter or so in front of me; almost within arm's reach.

Golden-crowned Sparrow [Zonotrichia atricapilla] is rare in Colorado, but two of them have wintered over at the same two spots both last winter and this. I've spotted them both, three years in a row now.

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 01:07 AM

Oops! Miscounted: make that 71 as of today. ("duck sp.", "wren sp.", etc. don't count.)

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 03:21 AM

Nice work Night Wing but how many from your house and property alone?

The point of this thread was to familirize youself with the common birds and to be a "Home List Challenge" with other birdwatching stories as well. We've been doing this here for many years.
I'd like to hear the full list By the way. I visit Denver sometimes and have enjoyed birding there.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 03:32 AM

OK 3:30 am, I just reread your post, Sorry. I'll blame my brain injury. I'd still like to see the Colorado list.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 07:20 AM

gnu,
Thanks.

maeve's link about the difference between a Bohemian Waxwing and a Cedar Waxwing is very good.

The Cedars are very yellow on the underside. I look for the rusty colour on the underside of the tail in Bohemians. My ex was colour blind and couldn't see that. He looked for the small white patches on the wing of a Bohemian. Generally we get Cedars in summer, Bohemians in winter, but I have seen the odd Cedar mixed in with a winter flock.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 01:40 PM

Thanks m.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Wesley S
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 01:53 PM

I started a thread on this above the line too but I thought the bird watchers here might enjoy it. About 1:30 into his song Josh Williams has a bird fly down and land on his guitar. But he manages to carry on.


What to do when a bird lands on your guitar during a performance.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 04:47 PM

I enjoyed that as much as I did rag's photos, Wesley. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Little Hawk
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 08:41 PM

Wow! Amazing!

Well, I saw a Red Cardinal today, along with some House Finches, Chickadees, and Mourning Doves.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 09:46 PM

That is soooo coool!

I do believe that bird is a newly fledged Carolina Wren. How appropriate does it get!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 10:44 PM

Re: Carolina Wrens - bold little birds, very comfortable around humans. Leave your screen door propped open for 20 minutes in warm weather, or have a hole in the screen, and you WILL have Carolina Wrens in the house, if you happen to live in Carolina, which I do. I can't count how many times we had them in the house when I was married to a man who often propped the door open to move stuff in and and out then forgot to close it.

Several years ago I was moving stuff around and cleaning behind small appliances on the kitchen counter when I encountered what I at first thought was a speckled jelly bean that had somehow strayed from my son's Easter Basket collection of candy from a couple of months earlier. It was a Carolina Wren's egg that had been laid behind the bread machine on the countertop. I cried (silly me) when I broke it in the process of unpacking after my move.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 11:04 PM

Wesley,
That video is wonderful! Thanks for posting the link here.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 07:16 PM

Boy, was I wrong. The fledgling is a cardinal per a post on the above the line thread. When I looked at the video last night I had on old reading glasses and also didn't think to enlarge the screen. Also let some assumptions get in the way of what I was seeing, wrens, even adult wrens, not minding people much. Thought it was awfully large for a wren but attributed that to it being puffed up, and thru the old glasses thought I saw an eye-stripe and a long, curved beak - all distortion.

Looking at it tonight with proper glasses and full-screen, the wedge-shaped beak is obvious as is the little crest. I should'a known better!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Elmore
Date: 24 Jan 12 - 01:42 PM

Do crows count? I hear they're very intelligent. Perhaps they do count.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 24 Jan 12 - 01:42 PM

Cool vid and the tune was great.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 01:31 PM

All birds count. Crows are very cool to watch. Ravens moreso.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: bobad
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 10:52 PM

There is a rare phenomenon happening with a mass southern migration of snowy owls this winter.

Article about it here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 29 Jan 12 - 12:27 AM

Have been following news accounts of their irruption. I'm too far south but can imagine the delight of birdwatchers in the central latitudes of the USA.


For the past 10-14 days a flock of black vultures has been roosting in the stand of trees that make a small wooded area across the road from my house. What a delight it is to watch them as they approach, circle, and then land in the tall trees.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 29 Jan 12 - 09:10 AM

Not Black Vultures. Meant to say Turkey Vultures.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 29 Jan 12 - 09:33 PM

Late this morning I was in the back of the house when my son yelled, "Mom, look out the window!" I hurried the front where the big windows are, and there were 7 or 8 of the vultures on the ground in my yard and several more in the trees. I've never had the opportunity to observe them so closely before and for such a long period of time.

They are remarkably alert birds. No surprise they have keen eye sight. The closest on the ground were probably 40 ft. from the house. When I approached the window with the camera they immediately flew up into the trees. I was still 3 or 4 feet away from the window. A little later I was in a back bedroom with big windows, but with venetian blinds that were down but with open slats, observing, but standing against the opposite wall from the window. They didn't fly up again, but everytime I moved, the two closest birds started, and shifted away a little. I was well behind them at that angle, so they apparently have amazing peripheral vision also.

I had dumped some suet nuggets out of the feeders several days ago that were all clumped together and that is what drew their interest. I noticed several crows shadowing them, drawn by their interest. I always have crows, but these crows were obviously keyed in on opportunistically following the vultures.

Yesterday evening I watched with my neighbor for about 20 minutes as the flock glided in and gathered in the trees behind his house. This morning he told me that just before full dark last night, the entire flock moved for the night to a stand of trees behind his brother's house, about 50 yards away from where they first gathered.

The Eastern Cherokee call Vultures Peace Eagles.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 31 Jan 12 - 11:35 PM

Yesterday I finally saw Bohemian Waxwings in my backyard.
I shot a few images through my (open) kitchen window and climbed a ladder on my deck to catch some on the roof.
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/diffuse/sets/72157629123166151/
(There are 4 images, scroll down to see all.)
rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 31 Jan 12 - 11:45 PM

Breathtaking photos, ragdall. We are so fortunate that you share these photos here.

Must have had a senior moment filling the feeders on Sunday. Wondered last night why one of the sunflower feeders was still full while the other was empty, but didn't have time to check it out until tonight. (And still don't have time to correct the problem.) When I hurriedly filled the feeders Sunday evening I not only filled the thistle feeder with nyger feed, I filled one of the sunflower feeders with nyger feed. Now I know that nyger seed appeals only to small finches.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 01 Feb 12 - 05:55 AM

Thanks, Janie,
I'm surprised that the nyjer seed didn't all slip out from the feeder, it's so fine. Maybe the other birds will learn to like it? (joking)

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Pete Jennings
Date: 01 Feb 12 - 08:43 AM

Great photos - we don't get waxwings in the UK so never seen one before.

The other day the missus saw a sparrowhawk fly up from our garden fence, latch onto a small bird (unidentified) and fly off with it. Well, it was lunchtime...


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Feb 12 - 10:20 PM

Rags, I said sunflower feeder because that is what I put in it, but it is a springed squirrel-proof feeder with a cylindrical hopper. The feeding apertures are at the base of the cylinder. It will hold any seed up to the size of sunflower seed, but peanuts are large enough to jam the divided tube.

The starlings wiped out a new suet cake in 1/2 day. The "caged" suet feeder, designed to keep out large birds and squirrels is touched only by the wrens. I thought that might be the case, but was hoping the bluebirds and nuthatches might also venture in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Charley Noble
Date: 02 Feb 12 - 02:17 PM

The cardinals were hard at work this morning in the pine boughs, sweeping the snow out of their old nest.

My mother's squirrel-proof feeder keeps out the gray squirrels but not the fat little red squirrel that owns her front yard.

Eagles are refurbishing their nest platform on the Sasanoa River.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 02 Feb 12 - 03:03 PM

rags... always excellent pics!

Red squirrel = rat with bushy tail. Grey = bigger rat with bigger bushy tail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 03 Feb 12 - 04:24 PM

Our big fat robin has arrived to get drunk in Mum's apple tree. -21C this AM. Guess he needs a bit of "warmth".


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 03 Feb 12 - 06:39 PM

Janie,
How many starlings are you feeding? I've had several crows empty a suet feeder in record time when I could get only small chunks of beef fat from the butcher to fill it.

gnu,
I think you must have gotten the cold that was intended for us?
It's nice when old friends return. I don't expect to see robins here for another three weeks, but with our crazy warm weather, who knows what is possible?

Red squirrels are adorable rats, when there is only one around. Ours has his own feeder. Unfortunately the crows have learned how to steal peanuts from it. Today I watched a crow taking two nuts at one time.   

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 03 Feb 12 - 11:14 PM

The robins hasve returned to Basking Ridge. Does that make them Basking Robins?
The local flock of turkeys has been much in evidence. We also were in Staten Island and saw a rather large flock on the grounds of the State mental hospital. Both flocks look fat and sassy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 04 Feb 12 - 12:25 AM

If anyone is not a member of eBird <http://ebird.org> yet, you should check it out!!!

Up to 13 at home this year:

Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Red-tailed Hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]
Eurasian Collared-Dove [Streptopelia decaocto]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Downy Woodpecker [Picoides pubescens]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
Dark-eyed Junco [Junco hyemalis]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]

Raptor asked for my list for all of Colorado as well, now up to 87 (again, for 2012).

Snow Goose [Chen caerulescens]
Cackling Goose [Branta hutchinsii]
Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Trumpeter Swan [Cygnus buccinator]
Gadwall [Anas strepera]
American Wigeon [Anas americana]
Mallard [Anas platyrhynchos]
Northern Shoveler [Anas clypeata]
Northern Pintail [Anas acuta]
Green-winged Teal [Anas crecca]
Canvasback [Aythya valisineria]
Redhead [Aythya americana]
Ring-necked Duck [Aythya collaris]
Lesser Scaup [Aythya affinis]
Long-tailed Duck [Clangula hyemalis]
Bufflehead [Bucephala albeola]
Common Goldeneye [Bucephala clangula]
Hooded Merganser [Lophodytes cucullatus]
Common Merganser [Mergus merganser]
Ruddy Duck [Oxyura jamaicensis]
Pied-billed Grebe [Podilymbus podiceps]
Horned Grebe [Podiceps auritus]
Eared Grebe [Podiceps nigricollis]
Western Grebe [Aechmophorus occidentalis]
Double-crested Cormorant [Phalacrocorax auritus]
Great Blue Heron [Ardea herodias]
Bald Eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus]
Northern Harrier [Circus cyaneus]
Cooper's Hawk [Accipiter cooperii]
Red-tailed Hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]
Rough-legged Hawk [Buteo lagopus]
Golden Eagle [Aquila chrysaetos]
American Kestrel [Falco sparverius]
Prairie Falcon [Falco mexicanus]
American Coot [Fulica americana]
Ring-billed Gull [Larus delawarensis]
California Gull [Larus californicus]
Herring Gull [Larus argentatus]
Thayer's Gull [Larus thayeri]
Lesser Black-backed Gull [Larus fuscus]
Glaucous Gull [Larus hyperboreus]
Rock Pigeon [Columba livia]
Eurasian Collared-Dove [Streptopelia decaocto]
Mourning Dove [Zenaida macroura]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Snowy Owl [Bubo scandiacus]
Belted Kingfisher [Megaceryle alcyon]
Downy Woodpecker [Picoides pubescens]
Hairy Woodpecker [Picoides villosus]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
Northern Shrike [Lanius excubitor]
Steller's Jay [Cyanocitta stelleri]
Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
Western Scrub-Jay [Aphelocoma californica]
Black-billed Magpie [Pica hudsonia]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
Common Raven [Corvus corax]
Black-capped Chickadee [Poecile atricapillus]
Mountain Chickadee [Poecile gambeli]
Bushtit [Psaltriparus minimus]
Red-breasted Nuthatch [Sitta canadensis]
White-breasted Nuthatch [Sitta carolinensis]
Pygmy Nuthatch [Sitta pygmaea]
Brown Creeper [Certhia americana]
American Dipper [Cinclus mexicanus]
Western Bluebird [Sialia mexicana]
Townsend's Solitaire [Myadestes townsendi]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
Bohemian Waxwing [Bombycilla garrulus]
Yellow-rumped Warbler [Setophaga coronata]
Spotted Towhee [Pipilo maculatus]
American Tree Sparrow [Spizella arborea]
Song Sparrow [Melospiza melodia]
White-crowned Sparrow [Zonotrichia leucophrys]
Golden-crowned Sparrow [Zonotrichia atricapilla]
Dark-eyed Junco [Junco hyemalis]
Red-winged Blackbird [Agelaius phoeniceus]
Western Meadowlark [Sturnella neglecta]
Great-tailed Grackle [Quiscalus mexicanus]
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch [Leucosticte tephrocotis]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
Pine Siskin [Spinus pinus]
Lesser Goldfinch [Spinus psaltria]
American Goldfinch [Spinus tristis]
Evening Grosbeak [Coccothraustes vespertinus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]

Definite and obvious misses so far:

A Greater Roadrunner has been hanging around on a ridge west of Denver: FAAAAAR out of its normal range. I still haven't managed to see it, though dozens (hundreds?) of other Denver-area birders have.

Horned Lark, Ferruginous Hawk, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Killdeer, Ring-necked Pheasant, and Canyon Wren.

Tomorrow (2012 Feb 4): Boulder's GULLAPALOOZA - The only day in the year that we get to go into the grounds (most importantly, the cooling ponds) of the Valmont power plant. With the storm last night, all day today, and tonight, the gulls should be hanging out RIGHT THERE for us. Possibility of as many as 5 lifers for me. Wish me luck!!!

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 04 Feb 12 - 06:35 AM

NightWing, Good luck!

My January tally is 9 species:
House sparrow
House Finch
Dark-eyed Junco
European Starling
Bohemian Waxwing
Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Brown Creeper
Northern Flicker

I wonder what February will bring?

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Pete Jennings
Date: 04 Feb 12 - 11:30 AM

Here in the UK, February has brought the blackbirds. There were 8 of them in our garden 20 mins ago. Where have they been?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 04 Feb 12 - 10:50 PM

Pete,
A flock of Red-winged Blackbirds were reported here a few days ago, also a male Northern Pintail Duck. It's been suggested that because of the warmer winter they were wintering a little south of here and are moving a little northward while the thaw lasts.   

I forgot to put the redpolls on my January list:
My January tally is 10 species:

House Sparrow
House Finch
Dark-eyed Junco
Common Redpolls
European Starling
Bohemian Waxwing
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Brown Creeper
Northern Flicker


February has been quiet so far:

House Sparrow
House Finch
Black-capped Chickadee
Northern Flicker
American Crow

I'm hoping for American Robins and Varied Thrush before the end of the month. We'll even have an extra day for them to arrive.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 05 Feb 12 - 09:52 AM

The first for me to see in my yard and also the very first thing I saw when my eyes opened this morning - a red-shouldered hawk was perched on a low branch very close to the house.

I rarely get such a good, long, close look.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 05 Feb 12 - 12:12 PM

I had not thought about keeping a bird list by month, but what a good idea - over time yields real specific information about when seasonal species arrive and depart on your exact locale.

And.....100!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 05 Feb 12 - 01:55 PM

Pete, I know, there were nine in our garden this morning, trying to hop about in 5 inches of snow. My heart bled for them, then I had a brainwave. I put down on top of the snow a large piece of plywood, and scattered a whole heap of stuff I'd prepared in the kitchen (chopped cheese, bacon rinds, apple, lard etc, all cut very small.) The blackbirds could hop onto the board and feed. Overhead were the goldfinches having their sunflower hearts, and the starlings were at the hanging fatcakes. No worries about rodents, the ground food was gone in about 30mins, all eaten by the blackies. Must remember to keep replacing the water bowl, as it freezes over quite fast. Trying to keep them going until this cold snap is over!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 05 Feb 12 - 02:05 PM

"water bowl"... They eat snow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 05 Feb 12 - 05:38 PM

I know, gnu,I used to think that. But the RSPB here advises fresh unfrozen water for them. Apparently they don't get to bathe their feathers in just snow, and they need to keep them groomed to get the max heat out of the plumage in the cold. Poor things, imagine having to live out there at this time of year. I'd invite them in if they'd agree!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 06 Feb 12 - 03:57 PM

HOLY CRAP BATMUNDO! There are well over fifty robins in Mum's apple tree! Unreal! They must have seen Al Gore on You Tube! Seriously, I have seen some wierd nature before but THIS takes the cake, hands down. Feb 6????


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 02:24 AM

I have never figured out why robins are considered to be harbingers of spring. In the places where they live (except for the far northern edge of their range), they don't migrate (far, at any rate). They're there all year 'round.

Nonetheless, here in Colorado, birders have been commenting that there are considerably MORE robins than we usually see in the winter ... and far fewer Townsend's Solitaires. Everyone's wondering what's going on.

ON-ON
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 02:56 AM

And I misspoke: they do migrate. But they both breed AND winter across the entire 48 contiguous States and southern the southern panhandle of Alaska

ON-ON
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 02:59 AM

gnu,
That's amazing! I thought it was still freakin' cold on your side?
Will the Robins be able to find enough to eat?

This afternoon I went for a drive to a little beyond the town boundary.
The only birds I saw were crows, one magpie
and this fellow keeping watch at the top of a tall Spruce beside the highway.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 03:02 AM

NightWing,
American Robins don't winter where I live. We get excited when we see them coming back because when there are few other signs that winter will end, they bring us hope that Spring will arrive again.   

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 09:23 AM

Rags, that baldie looks as though he is hold something in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Beer
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 09:29 AM

Beautiful picture Rags. And Gnu, that would be the makings for a great picture.
A small point to make in reference to early sighting of robins. One immediately thinks that they have come up and it is a sure sign of an early spring. However, it should be noted that many robins winter mush farther north and the ones we see early are some that come down where it is a little warmer. I read this (that is something like this) years ago and wish I had cut out the article.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 01:23 PM

Except for the lone robin that has arrived as early as Jan 8 for four years, I have never seen a robin arrive here until April in my life. I am 55.

rags... another great pic.

Beer... I got a buncha pics. Haven't downloaded them yet. You ever see my pic of the drunk robin under the apple tree on the snow?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 02:45 PM

THANKS maeve!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Beer
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 03:18 PM

Yes, thank you maeve. Very interesting.
Ad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 03:05 AM

Interesting read, Maeve. Thanks for the link, gnu. Are your new robin pictures available yet?
No sign of Robins here, yet. When we do get them here in Spring they always seem to be following the "break up" northward.

EBarnacle, what did you think the eagle was holding in?
The eagle was on the same tree today, along with another eagle who flew away before I could position myself where the overhead wires along the highway wouldn't cut through the picture.   

I went out today looking for a Northern Hawk Owl that has been posing in an industrial area south of town. My lens isn't strong enough to get a good shot from an angle below a tall tree, but I was happy to see and record it at all. It's been several years since I saw a Hawk Owl.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 03:20 AM

Great happenings in my own yard. Saturday I saw a female Downy Woodpecker at one of the suet feeders for the first time this year. On Sunday I watched a female Downy Woodpecker on the ailing Birch tree, on the street side of my house, chiseling out a nest cavity while a gang of Black-capped Chickadees flitted around excitedly. I was imagining a Birch full of fledgling woodpeckers to photograph.

Sadly, I haven't seen the Downy since Sunday. A pair of ruffian chickadees seem to have taken over the nest cavity. They have been busy flying in and out the past two days removing wood shavings.

There is a short video on Flickr of the woodpecker excavating, -- Sorry, it doesn't always seem to run well there. http://www.flickr.com/photos/diffuse/6868863169/

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 07:00 AM

That's a lovely bit of video, rags.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 07:27 AM

Had a proper valentine's day sighting yesterday.

Heard a screech outside and a winged form shot past the window so I hurried upstairs for the binoculars and looked out.
A kestrel was just landing on one of the garden fence posts. As I was wondering if it was a male or a female he took flight again and moved over to another fence post where he mated with the waiting female!
At the same time I spotted movement across the field and there was a third kestrel, presumably anothe male who had just been chased away.

I've no idea whee they ar nesting but there is a ruined farmhouse two fields away that is probably full of arificial rock-face sites for them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Charley Noble
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 08:16 PM

The pair of eagles that generally nest on an osprey platform in the middle of the Sasanoa River in Maine are both back in residence. They shouldn't be laying eggs for a month or so but the weather has been unusually warm.

No sign yet of the osprey pair that nests nearby.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 09:40 PM

This list if from my window to the backyard in the southern tip of the Ozarks in north central Arkansas, USA. I got lucky today. We rarely see a Brown-headed Nuthatch in this area, and I happened to have my eye on the feeder when this little guy showed up for a brief moment and then disappeared.

January (started late in the month).

Cardinal
Carolina Chickadee
Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Goldfinch
grackle
house finch
house sparrow
Junco
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
purple finch
Red Bellied Woodpecker
robin
starling
Tufted Titmouse
White Breasted Nuthatch
White Throated Sparrow

February

Bluebird
Blue Jay
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Cardinal
Carolina Wren
Carolina Chickadee
Chipping Sparrow
Cooper's Hawk
Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Eurasian Collared Dove
Goldfinch
Grackle
House Finch
House Sparrow
Junco
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Oregon Junco
Pine Warbler
Purple Finch
Red-Bellied Woodpecker
Robin
Starling
White Breasted Nuthatch
White Throated Sparrow
Tufted Titmouse
Yellow Shafted Flicker
Yellow Warbler


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 15 Feb 12 - 10:10 PM

Realizing how few Juncos I am seeing this winter. They usually are as common as the finches and titmouse here, year round.

I'll add my thanks to maeve (and gnu) for the Robin link. I know robins are here year round but rarely see them until late winter, and then only when it is damp and relatively warm. Now I know why.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 05:59 AM

Arkie,
That's a very impressive list! You must go through a lot of bird seed?

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 01:30 PM

Rags, whoever made the statement "eat like a bird" apparently never observed a bird at meal time. We help keep the local co-op in business. About a third of the birds on the list are regulars and a couple have been spotted once or twice. The hawk has shown up a couple of times this week, but I have not seen it attack any of the other birds although most of them disappear when the hawk arrives. I do enjoy the little critters and the information provided here has improved my understanding.

I decided to try to help out with the Great Backyard Bird Count this year. Any other Mudcatters involved?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 06:16 PM

Great pics and vids rags. I'll send you a pic of the robins soon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 06:48 PM

My wife and I celebrated Valentine's Day and our 10th anniversary late, because we have to find a sitter for Grandma, who lives with us.
So, yesterday we spent a wonderful day at Gray Lodge Wildlife Area down the hill from us in the Sacramento River Valley. We saw lots of American coots, which are always fun; and a huge number of snow geese that spend the winter here. I saw a couple of black-necked stilts, birds I've never seen before. Oh, and several beautiful Northern Shovelers, both males and females.

After a beautiful sunset, I told my wife, "It's owl time now - watch carefully." Sure enough, we sighted a great horned owl and we were able to watch him through binoculars for several minutes before he flew away. We had brief views of three other owls in our headlights as we drove home, but weren't able to identify them specifically.

My photos didn't come out as well as these (click) or these or these (click).


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 02:16 PM

Have a brown-headed nuthatch at the feeders today - the first time I've seen one in the yard or at the feeders.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 06:01 PM

So far in February:
Cardinal
Black-capped Chickadees
Purple Finches
American Goldfinches
Some furtive sparrows
Ravens
Crows
Bald Eagles
hawk
Mourning Doves
Wild turkeys
Common Nuthatches
Downy Woodpeckers
Pileated Woodpecker
Many American Robins

Heard Great Horned Owls and Barred Owls


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 20 Feb 12 - 12:26 PM

This link is to some stats from this year's Great Backyard Birdcount which ends today.

Bird Count Stats


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 02:19 PM

I carried a wounded American Crow to the bird rehabbers this morning; one wing full of bird shot. Crow Season just opened a day or two ago so it's considered legal, but at least they could have made a clean end to it rather than leave a wounded bird with shattered wing bones flopping around in the snow. The rehabbers had just spent a night working on a Bald Eagle which was looking woozy but alive when I stopped in.

On the way home I saw a large flock of Snow Buntings in a hay field up the road from our house- not to be counted in my home list, but a delight, none the less.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 04:03 PM

It seems a bit early, but the cardinals are starting to pair up and a few wrens and housefinches are starting their "look at me" songs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Black Belt Caterpillar Wrestler
Date: 27 Feb 12 - 08:39 AM

Had the first skylarks of the year appear on Saturday 25th, last year it was the 14th. Also had a large flock of what appeared to be fieldfares yesterday, though they were on the move and a field away so difficult to be sure of.

I don't know what that says about the weather patterns.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 05:03 AM

The eagles are on their nest near the river confluence, the Northern Hawk Owl is still finding rodents in the industrial area south of town.
In my yard, the Black-capped Chickadees are carrying out bits of wood from the nest cavity the Downy Woodpecker provided for them. I'm wondering when/if they will start carrying nesting materials into the cavity?

February tally for my yard - 9 :
Black-capped Chickadees
Dark-eyed Juncos
Common Redpolls
Bohemian Waxwings
House Sparrows
House Finches
Female Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flickers
American crows


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joe Offer
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 11:58 PM

I see Maeve sighted a cardinal, which makes me jealous as hell. Has anyone seen cardinals on the U.S. West Coast? Do they exist in Europe?

I was at Point Reyes National Seashore in California with a friend, and he was sure he spotted a cardinal. He was so convinced, I hated to tell him that what he was looking at was a fire hydrant.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: scouse
Date: 02 Mar 12 - 05:31 AM

The people up in Friesland here in "Cloggieland." land have just been given permission to take one Lapwings egg again. This seems to be an annual sport to see who can be the first to find one. See below...

Lapwing egg hunt to go ahead

Tuesday 01 March 2011

The traditional hunt for lapwings' eggs will go ahead in Friesland this March although hunters must ask for permission from the provincial council by telephone text message before taking each egg they find, NRC Next reports.

In total, 5,939 eggs can be collected, despite the objections of bird protection groups.

Friesland is the only place in Europe where the eggs can be collected on cultural-historical grounds.

© DutchNews.nl


As Aye,

Phil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Bobert
Date: 02 Mar 12 - 08:49 AM

The birds have finally found us... Took a month or so before they figured out that our bird feeder is a bird feeder... We have the usual North Carolina birds but out favorites are the red headed woodpeckers that we didn't have back in Virginia... No palliated woodpeckers - sniff - however in these parts...

We do have our very own hawk because of the fields the surround our little tree'd oasis... We'll see if he leaves other birds alone purdy soon as baby birds hatch out... I hope he's happy with squirrels and mice...

B~


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 02 Mar 12 - 10:49 AM

I feel fortunate that Cardinals are regularly sighteed here. Don't see them everyday but sometimes two or three pairs drop by. Here is my list for February. Since the hawk has been showing up frequently in the neighborhood, the other birds are not around as much. The Pine Warbler, Yellow Warbler, and Brown-headed Nuthatch were sighted only once. Would like to see more of them.


Bluebird
Blue Jay
Cardinal
Carolina Wren
Carolina Chickadee
Chipping Sparrow
Cooper's Hawk
Cowbird
Crow
Eurasian Collared Dove
Finch, House
Finch, Purple
Goldfinch
Grackle
Junco
Junco Hybrid
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Nuthatch, Brown-headed
Nuthatch, White Breasted
Pine Siskin
Pine Warbler
Sparrow, House
Sparrow, White Throated
Redwing Blackbird
Robin
Starling
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Buzzard
Yellow Shafted Flicker
Yellow Warbler
Woodpecker, Downy
Woodpecker, Hairy
Woodpecker, Red-Bellied


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,NightWing, who can't get his cookie set :-(
Date: 04 Mar 12 - 12:59 AM

Didn't do so well in February (8) as I did in January (13):

January

Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Red-tailed Hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]
Eurasian Collared-Dove [Streptopelia decaocto]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Downy Woodpecker [Picoides pubescens]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
Dark-eyed Junco [Junco hyemalis]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]
February

Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
Black-capped Chickadee [Poecile atricapillus]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
American Goldfinch [Spinus tristis]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]





 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

For a total of 15 species for the year.

The list above is for my home in Louisville, Colorado, USA (near Denver). Everywhere I've birded this year (all in Colorado), I've made 99 species so far.

Couple of exciting things to report (though none at my home :).

The "Gullapalooza" day on 2/4 went very well. I saw 41 species, including 11 species of ducks, 4 of grebes, 6 of raptors (including a pair of Bald Eagles copulating on a power line and a Prairie Falcon who dive-bombed us) and 4 of gulls. Two new Lifers:

Tundra Swan [Cygnus columbianus]
Red-necked Grebe [Podiceps grisegena]

And five new species for the year:

Green-winged Teal [Anas crecca]
Red-breasted Merganser [Mergus serrator]
Black-crowned Night-Heron [Nycticorax nycticorax]
Ferruginous Hawk [Buteo regalis]
Thayer's Gull [Larus thayeri]

And I mentioned the out-of-range Greater Roadrunner [Geococcyx californianus] seen in the Denver area. I tried and tried to spot the thing. Six times I was up on the ridge where it was being seen: that is, people were seeing it every day I wasn't there.

Finally, on my seventh trip, on 2/27, I had spent nearly two hours at the location and the time of day he had been seen most commonly. I was giving up and heading back for the car. A passing bicyclist happened to be from Arizona; he saw the bird working its way along the roadbed, recognized it, and realized that its appearance here was very unusual. He took a few pictures of it and saw me up the road about a quarter mile, carrying a telescope with tripod and obviously a birder. He came roaring up to me and shouted that he had seen a Roadrunner and did I want to see it. He showed me where he had seen it, rode back down the hill, and pointed wildly off to one side. I understood (correctly, he came back by later) him to mean that the bird had just gone down the hill right there.

I hurried down to that point and began scanning the hillside below me: no sign of the Roadrunner. For another hour, I hiked up and down the roadbed in increasing arcs, looking down (and UP) the slope, hope fading. Finally, as my time was running out, I headed down the slope again to the parking lot and my car to leave.

On what I decided would be my last look over the edge of the roadbed, I peeked over the edge ... to see the Greater Roadrunner working his way along the slope less than 10 m below me. He was very unconcerned about my presence and I followed him 200 or 300 m as he worked his way along the slope hunting for (presumably) bugs of some kind. He definitely did not catch any snakes (the primary food of the Greater Roadrunner in their usual range), unless they were less than about 3-5 cm in length.

Most common misses so far this year: Northern Pintail [Anas acuta], Ring-necked Pheasant [Phasianus colchicus], Sharp-shinned Hawk [Accipiter striatus], Horned Lark [Eremophila alpestris], and Canyon Wren [Catherpes mexicanus].

BB,
NightWing

And another advertisement, if you're a birder, from serious to completely un-, and you're not using the eBird website <http://ebird.org/>, you're SERIOUSLY missing a bet. (I have no financial or other interest in eBird; I am merely a very satisfied user.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 04 Mar 12 - 08:27 AM

Wow, nightwing! Congrats on your persistence in spotting that Road Runner?

Thanks for the ebird link. I took a look around and it appears to be a great resource, and a good place to learn more about developing skills as a birder.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: scouse
Date: 14 Mar 12 - 11:19 AM

Ok.. Two of my wild Turtle Doves have just this moment been having it off on my Balcony... Seen them last year do the same but never this early!!! Now they are cooin' away at each other!! Springs early this year I think.

As Aye,

Phil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 15 Mar 12 - 10:45 AM

I read something a couple of days ago that is supposed to help deter house sparrows from feeders and nesting for bluebirds and purple martins. Would like to know if it works. It was suggested that strings or fishing line be suspended above the nesting or feeders. This is supposed to irritate house sparrows but not bother other birds. Sparrow's don't like their wings hitting the strings. Anybody tried this.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 15 Mar 12 - 01:23 PM

Arkie- Have you seen this website? I think you might find some good information there. http://www.sialis.org/hosp.htm


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 15 Mar 12 - 02:36 PM

Great site NW! Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 04:54 PM

Lots of courtin' going on among my feathered friends.

The male goldfinches are molting. Saw my first really bright yellow fellow just a little while ago. He is not fully molted yet, but very close.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 05:11 PM

Don't you just love that first flash of gold, Janie?

This week-

From the back porch we've heard Boreal Owl (astonishingly!), Great Horned Owl, Barred Owl.

In and over our yard: Black-capped chickadees, wild turkeys, Mourning doves, Bald eagles, Ravens, American crows a-courting, Purple and American goldfinches by the dozen, grackles, Canada geese, various wild ducks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 05:14 PM

Oh- also American robins continue to wander through. Two were singing out in the apple orchard early this morning.

Our bantams are laying again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 06:09 PM

Ok- one more post and I'm through...probably. I heard our first White-throated sparrow of the year this afternoon as well as our first singing male Red-wing blackbird singing hither and yon as I pruned the roses and harvested the basket willows.

I ran across some wonderful birdsong videos just now. Love that little Winter Wren Portrait. Find it here: Winter Wren Portrait- YouTube- Lang Elliot & Bob McGuire


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 06:20 PM

Had my windows open all afternoon. Dunno what kinda songbirds I have heard for the past three days as my eyes are not too good these days BUT their songs are beautiful. I have never seen weather this warm this early or such birds. Talking 19C on Wednesday. UNreal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 17 Mar 12 - 06:52 PM

Thanks for link to the video, maeve.

The only wrens I have are Carolina Wrens. I love their songs and scolds.

Also love white-throated sparrows. They winter here and some hang around year round. 99% of the time they scratch around on the ground under the feeders, but this year one or two got adventuresome and mastered one of the feeders.

Have been gradually seeing more Dark-eyed Juncos. Don't know what happened to their population this winter in this neck of the woods. Glad to see more of them.

I do wish I lived on a fly way. Most of the birds here are year round or winter residents. I rarely see or hear species in migration. Oh well. At least I have the opportunity to observe the year round behaviors, molts and feeding patterns of some species.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 04:51 PM

Some excellent bird pics and records on this site from some hippy in France I think!
timbobagginsabroad@blogspot.com


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Mar 12 - 04:54 PM

Re above post

sorry, this is a better link

http://timbobagginsabroad.blogspot.fr/


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 06:36 PM

Purple Martin scouts arrived today. Seems a little late, but glad to see them back.

Maeve, thanks for linking to the site on house sparrows. I had seen it, but was in a bit of a hurry when I posted. I have spent a bit more time there but still have some concern that efforts to deter house sparrows might not discourage bluebirds and martins as well as other desirables as well. Guess I need to try some things on a limited basis. I am reluctant to drill a two inch hole in the roof of a bluebird house but am trying to figure a way to cover the hole with glass or plexiglass and make it look nice and waterproof.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 10:44 PM

As w stepped ou of the house today, a couple of young chickadees were having a discussion with a female cardinal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 25 Mar 12 - 12:30 AM

WOOHOO!!!

A Lifer, while walking through the parking lot at work!!!

Purple Finch are highly unusual in Colorado. eBird shows only 9 reported in the entire state over the past 10 years. I've never seen one.

Yesterday evening (about 45 minutes before sunset), I looked up at a pair of House Finch in the tree across the gully from the parking lot and thought, "That doesn't look right!"

And it wasn't. It was a male and female Purple Finch. I looked for them again today before work and during every break, but no. They've probably migrated on north.

#243 on my Life List ... which admittedly I've only been keeping for about six or seven years. (Had I actually kept a Life List my entire life it would be MUCH longer than that :)

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 25 Mar 12 - 10:41 AM

About three days ago, I noticed the birds starting to mate. Well, "chase" might be a better word. Seems too early but I don't know much about this behaviour.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 25 Mar 12 - 10:44 AM

Here in my part of Arkansas we have an abundance of house finches and some days will see the Purple Finch as well. I still get excited when I see them. While there are differences, I find them hard to tell apart unless you get a good view. The females are much easier to identify. Night Wing, I can understand your excitement.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 26 Mar 12 - 11:48 AM

Our astonishment has been to clearly hear a Boreal owl several nights ago. On a non-bird-yet-interesting note, we have an American Marten visiting; the first we've seen.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 Mar 12 - 01:06 PM

Well, I gotta boast. I was on my way to Los Angeles last week, and I spent a day along the way at Pinnacles National Monument - it's more-or-less inland from Monterey. I climed through the most treacherous cave I've been in, and ended up at a spot that felt like it was the top of the world. High above me, I saw a huge, vulture-like bird - with white markings on its shoulders that looked like a skeleton to me. It was a California Condor, the largest bird in North America. I saw two that day - both were high above me, but the white markings were very clear in binoculars. There are only 275 California condors in existence, so I feel privileged to have seen two.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 26 Mar 12 - 02:59 PM

m... a martin? Dangerous! One shot at the chooks and their all dead. I know you won't, but I say terminate it ASAP.

I was just cooking and watching the snow. That's when I saw the flock of blackbirds and... drum roll, please... a canary in my maple tree. It looked, daze, confused and piss off.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: freda underhill
Date: 27 Mar 12 - 08:43 AM

two currawongs had a very noisy fight in my back yard this afternoon, swawking, cawking and beating each other up until a neighbour set the hose on them..


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Rusty Dobro
Date: 28 Mar 12 - 05:31 AM

A perfect spring day at Minsmere yesterday - lovely sunny weather and birds out in force. My life remains a bittern-free zone (though someone else saw two), but good views of two marsh harriers.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: olddude
Date: 28 Mar 12 - 01:20 PM

big flock of turkey today roaming in my yard. They walked through the bushes from the grape vine ... not afraid of anything just pecking my yard. It was wonderful


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: SINSULL
Date: 29 Mar 12 - 12:39 PM

A very large and very lost turkey has taken up residence on my lawn. His cries are pathetic - a cross between a croak and a gobble. Poor baby is away from Mom for the first time. Hope his family comes back today to claim him.
SINS, wondering about the logistics of adopting a huge bird.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 29 Mar 12 - 02:33 PM

"wondering about the logistics of adopting a huge bird."

375F


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 29 Mar 12 - 07:20 PM

Logistics...he'll likely be a young male from last year's clutch, Mary, and has been sent out into the world to make his way. Let him be and he should wander along to seek his fortune in the world of turkeys.

Gnu- Any more Canadian canary sightings? What a surprise, and oh what a miserable canary!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: NightWing
Date: 31 Mar 12 - 08:38 PM

January: 13
February: 8
March: 15

January

Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Red-tailed Hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]
Eurasian Collared-Dove [Streptopelia decaocto]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Downy Woodpecker [Picoides pubescens]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
Dark-eyed Junco [Junco hyemalis]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]
February

Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
Black-capped Chickadee [Poecile atricapillus]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
American Goldfinch [Spinus tristis]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]
March

Canada Goose [Branta canadensis]
Killdeer [Charadrius vociferus]
Ring-billed Gull [Larus delawarensis]
Eurasian Collared-Dove [Streptopelia decaocto]
Mourning Dove [Zenaida macroura]
Great Horned Owl [Bubo virginianus]
Downy Woodpecker [Picoides pubescens]
Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus]
Blue Jay [Cyanocitta cristata]
American Crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]
White-breasted Nuthatch [Sitta carolinensis]
American Robin [Turdus migratorius]
European Starling [Sturnus vulgaris]
House Finch [Carpodacus mexicanus]
House Sparrow [Passer domesticus]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Making a total of 19 species for the year at my home near Denver, Colorado, USA.

As of today, 108 species for the year. 84 for the month, including two Lifers for me: the pair of Purple Finch [Carpodacus purpureus] I described a couple of weeks ago and a pair of Black-and-white Warbler [Mniotilta varia]. The latter were not as exciting a sighting as the Purple Finch was because I couldn't see the birds very well. Basically, what I had was two birds acting like Nuthatch, but with bold, black-and-white stripes across head, back, wings, and flanks.

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 01 Apr 12 - 07:52 PM

I would like to see less of the House Sparrows and Starlings. The Grackles may have moved on. And possibly the Juncos. I did not see any this week. The Goldfinch have been turning yellow and over the past week may have made the transition. The Cowbirds have been hogging my feeders. The big thing for me was the return of the Purple Martins. I love watching them and listening to them. Today it looked like they might be mating. Here is my list for the month. Here in north central Arkansas on the southern edge of the Ozarks. Was excited to see the Brownheaded Nuthatch. Only saw it twice.


Bluebird
Blue Jay
Canadian Goose
Cardinal
Carolina Chickadee
Chipping Sparrow
Cowbird
Crow
Finch, House
Finch, Purple
Goldfinch
Grackle
Junco
Killdeer
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Nuthatch, Brown-headed
Nuthatch, White Breasted
Purple Martin
Sparrow, House
Sparrow, White Throated
Redwing Blackbird
Robin
Starling
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Buzzard
Woodpecker, Downy
Woodpecker, Red-Bellied


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 23 Apr 12 - 12:53 AM

Near the rivers, the eaglets have hatched, Ospreys are nesting, many hundred gulls rest on sandbars. Hundreds of Canada Geese, Trumpeter Swans and assorted ducks have migrated in and staked claim to nesting sites, or moved on in search of better ones. Mountain Bluebirds, American Robins and Varied Thrush are here, Townsend's Solitaires are more plentiful this year than I can ever remember. Dozens of Long-billed Curlew can be seen foraging in the fields again.

My back yard tally for March is 10

House Sparrow
Black-capped Chickadee
Northern Flicker
Common Redpoll
Pine Siskin
House Finch
American Crow
American Robin
Varied Thrush
Red-winged Blackbird


rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Apr 12 - 01:31 AM

I won't make a list, but I have a couple of bird observations.

There is a nest in my back yard, a small pointy-headed bird with a pink/orange beak. Most probably a cardinal. It is a horribly constructed nest in a precarious set of small branches in the vitex in my back yard. The vitex my pit bull patrols under because she is interested in birds. I am going to try to block the space under the tree this year to keep her from killing (by playing with) or eating the fledglings. When she is interested in something she stubbornly goes back again and again . . . you should have seen her hunting lizards last summer. Oy.

On the other hand, I have my best friend's chocolate lab here, we are in our fourth month (she is in rehab after many weeks in the hospital - as a pedestrian she was hit by a car in the parking lot at work). He is getting the idea of what it is that my dogs race to the back of the yard to bark at, but he isn't so interested in the barely-visible spectres they ward off. Today there were four crows in the yard at the back. We never had crows here until last year, and then I only glimpsed them. Now I'm seeing crows instead of many of the songbirds that used to be around the yard. Someone is feeding the birds bread and they bring it to my birdbaths. They're here, but I haven't seen any cardinals (except for the nest) and jays and bluebirds and such. I used to think crows were just wonderful, I helped a friend raise a chick that fell out of the nest many years ago, but here and now, they are a problem. I saw some swarm an owl a couple of weeks ago and I do believe they killed it. The ruckus in the woods was incredible, and after a lot of crow squawks I heard a different bird, the cry was loud but defensive - I think it was the owl.

Anyway, Zeke and I made eye contact, and though I didn't think he'd understand me I pointed and said "get rid of those crows, Zeke!" and off he went at a tear, headed straight for the birds, who flew off when they saw him. I think Zeke knows his role in the yard now, and I am sad to say that my old favorite birds now seem to be harbingers of not-so-great-climate-change to come.

SRS


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Subject: BS: Bird Apps
From: Joe Offer
Date: 23 Apr 12 - 02:31 AM

So far, the most interesting applications for "smart" phones and tablets, are bird identification apps. I have a trial version of iBird Pro, and I really like it. There are so many others, and I wonder if anybody has had any experience with them.
Oh - any good wildflower guide apps?
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 30 Apr 12 - 09:01 PM

This has been a rather eventful month for birding here in the southern tip of the Arkansas USA Ozarks. First ever sighting for me of the Northern Parula, and visits from the Brown-headed Nuthatch, Indigo Bunting, Blue Grosbeak, and Rose Breasted Grosbeaks as well as Collared Doves and White Winged Doves. The Hummingbirds returned last week.

Here is my list for the month.


Bluebird
Blue Jay
Canadian Goose
Brown Thrasher
Cardinal
Carolina Chickadee
Cowbird
Crow
Dove, Eurasian Collared
Dove, Mourning
Dove, White Winged
Finch, House
Finch, Purple
Flycatcher, Scissor-tailed
Goldfinch
Grackle
Grosbeak, Blue
Grosbeak, Rose Breasted
Hummingbird, Ruby Throated
Indigo Bunting
Killdeer
Mockingbird
Northern Parula
Nuthatch, Brown-Headed
Nuthatch, White Breasted
Pine Siskin
Purple Martin
Redwing Blackbird
Robin
Sparrow, Chipping
Sparrow, House
Sparrow, White Crowned
Starling
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Buzzard
Woodpecker, Downy
Woodpecker, Red-Bellied


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 30 Apr 12 - 10:58 PM

Two species in my yard spotted this weekend that I have not seen before in this particular location.

Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Harrier


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 01 May 12 - 05:11 AM

This past weekend, the park I am leaving ans the park I am transferring to held a joint bird-watching festival geared toward families and people who are bird watchers rather than birders. We had around 600 people, mostly families with young children. Sunday, I got to stand with a spotting scope trained on an osprey nest and invite people to look at one of my favorite birds for four hours and get paid for it! I think after this weekend, many of them will return to follow "our" osprey.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 01 May 12 - 05:53 AM

April 2012 backyard tally = 14

White-crowned Sparrow
American Robin
Pine Siskin
Common Redpoll
Purple Finch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-capped Chickadee
House Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
House Finch
Rufous Hummingbird
Northern Flicker
American Crow
rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 May 12 - 08:36 PM

I like that distinction (spelling?), Tami.

I'm an avid birdwatcher from my front window, but not a birder by any definition.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 May 12 - 09:41 PM

rags, your photos are always wonderful, and these are no exception. Looks like you borrowed the yellow-rumped warbler, but all things considered, that's fine.

I'm beginning to think we have the Crows From Hell here this spring. They usually pass through, but these have stayed and are nesting. And they're dragging all sorts of food into my bird baths. Bread, hotdog buns, hot dogs. Lizards. Birds. Yes, I'm finding bits of animals they have eaten in the bird bath water. Perhaps they are picking up roadkill - I think the hotdogs are coming from the other side of a busy boulevard. But this is really bizarre this year, and even people who rarely notice birds have remarked on their unusual behavior.

SRS


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: JHW
Date: 02 May 12 - 12:11 PM

My hanging Peanut Feeder (with outer squirrel guard cage) is used by Blue Tits, Great Tits, Coal Tits, Long Tailed but today I saw a House Sparrow HOVERING with wings going flat out to peck a peanut from the feeder it is not built to cling to. Never seen this before but in minutes a Robin was doing the same, indeed they were taking turns.
I've often wondered how far a bird can go on a seed, i.e. is the nutrition worth the effort it takes to get it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Jeri
Date: 02 May 12 - 12:51 PM

I looked out my door on May 1st to see pairs of two different types of grosbeaks in my feeder: evening and rose-breasted. In addition to:

black-capped chickadee
tufted titmouse
cardinal
gold finch
bluejay
house sparrow
hairy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
white-breasted nut hatch
mourning dove
crow
starling
grackle
red-bellied woodpecker
american robin
red-winged blackbirds (in a flock--probably passing through)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 02 May 12 - 09:02 PM

SRS,
Thank you. The warbler wasn't borrowed. It was in my backyard. The photo wasn't high enough resolution for a full size image.

The crows here always like to wash/soak their food before eating it. It's a challenge to keep any water clear of crow debris.

JHW,
I've often wondered the same thing (is the nutrition worth the effort it takes to get it?) Birds must have much more efficient metabolism than humans do?

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: katlaughing
Date: 03 May 12 - 11:49 PM

For those of you who can access the Mudcat Facebook page, I just "shared" some pix by my son of a nesting pair of Great Horned Owls with two fluffy chicks. It's incredible how the adults are so well camouflaged against the bark of a cottonwood tree. The nest is right outside a condo bedroom window of a fellow tenant. She's been really nice about letting the property manager, and my son, his asst., to come in and take pix. This is basically in the middle of a small city, near a lake and lots of prey. My son said the detritus at the bottom of the tree every day is quite interesting...bits of fluff, regurgitated stuff, bits the chicks apparently didn't like and spit out.:-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 May 12 - 12:09 AM

A cardinal is nesting in the purple chaste (Vitex) in my back yard. Last year I paid attention to a nest, so my pit bull paid attention. I think she might have eaten the fledglings when they landed on the grass under the tree, so this year I haven't gone near the cardinal. I'll put the dog in the house and take a few photos tomorrow (I have to head out of town, and the time between hatching and fledgling is so short I might not be back before they're gone!)

I have been caring for a friend's Chocolate Lab for four months (come next week). She has been in the hospital, long story, but he has learned from my two dogs about grazing (what to eat grass-wise and tree-sprout-wise). Last week as I looked in disgust at 5 or 6 crows in the back by the fence I said "Zeke, get rid of those crows!" and threw my arm in a point at them.

By George! he got it! He raced back, barked, and they all flew off, he was so pleased with himself, and now my sweetheart Zeke has a JOB in the yard, to chase off big black birds. I've seen him do it several times since. (My dogs race to the back to bark at possums, skunks, coyotes, etc.)

SRS (I know, more of a dog story than a bird story.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 04 May 12 - 10:28 PM

To the extent I am home to observe have been watching an interesting duet between the Downy Woodpeckers and the Red-bellied woodpeckers this past week or so. They appear to both compete and also cue off one another in terms of food sources. The little Downies are not at all intimidated by the much larger Red-bellied Woodpeckers and they don't appear to quarrel over the either the suet or sunflower feeders, but they definitely appear to track one another's movements amongthe trees.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 05 May 12 - 06:55 AM

Kat, owls eat everything, fur, bones, claws, toenails, etc. and then regurgitate the non-digestibles back up in pellet form. Kinda like a cat does a hairball. You can purchase sanitized owl pellets through many scientific supply catalogs, so that you can pick 'em apart and see what the owl was eating.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,999
Date: 05 May 12 - 04:10 PM

About two hours ago there were two mourning doves, one pigeon, two grackles, half dozen starlings, some hedge sparrows and a white-crowned sparrow (never seen one before), a downy woodpecker, red winged blackbird and a raven. They were all pecking at seed or the fat feeder and getting along. Mostly the raven just strutted around.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 05 May 12 - 07:00 PM

We are having heavy rain right now, and 3 house finches are perched on the window sill under the eave, peering curiously in through the window.

Either that or the window screen looks like a big mesh thistle feeder and they are wondering when I'm planning on filling it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 05 May 12 - 07:31 PM

Guest,999,
That's an impressive collection. Thousands of White-crowned Sparrows migrate through here every April. There are still a few around entertaining us with their varied vocals. They must not be as plentiful in the East?

I've never seen a grackle.

    rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 06 May 12 - 06:17 AM

I spent four hours osprey watching last week and getting paid to do it! Other birds making an appearance were a kingfisher, a pileated woodpecker, a bald eagle, a couple of great blue herons, eiders, mourning doves, chickadees, black-throated green warblers (heard, but not seen), crows, and a ton of herring gulls, with the occasional ring-bill gull thrown in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 06 May 12 - 08:37 AM

yesterday evening a fledging Carolina chickadee that could not yet fly hopped up on the carport onto a wire planter and visited with me for quite some time. Closest observation observation of a chickadee I have ever had the opportunity to make. Momma chickadee didn't seem too upset that I was near. It eventually hopped down and toddled across the yard to a low shrub. Hope it made it through the night (cats prowl at night around these parts.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: open mike
Date: 06 May 12 - 03:17 PM

The feeders visible from th ehouse are a constant source of amuesement and entertainment...
from the clown-like antics of the goldfinches on the thistle seed socks
to the hummers hovering at the "juice bar" there is almost always some activity !!

Bluebirds have begun to visit since the forest fire of '08 cleared lots of trees..they like open space and we had none prior to that.

Towhees, grosbeaks and varied thrush all require a second look to distinguish them from each other.

the wild turkey who used to visit daily has not come around lately.. I suspect next time we see here she will be leading a brood of chicks

red-headed sparrows (house sparrows? purple finch?) an black headed juncos often visit the feeder.

We have robins and sparrow hawks visiting occasionally , as well as
a covey of quail...or maybe event 2 - 3 different coveys...almost 50 in all.

There was a yellow warbler hovering near the door the other day and
a startling blue bird was briefly seen...probably an indigo bunting or a lazuli bunting.

Blue jays (camp robbers) and cowbirds come sometimes.

Woodpeckers like the suet cakes ...and the flickers do too.

there is a family of wrens nesting in a bird house very near
the house

and high above in the sky there are Osprey probably fishing at a near by lake...for the babies we sometimes hear shrieking from the nest.

Also red tailed hawks, ravens and crows fly near.

We rarely see, but often hear owls,

and inside the canaries are always singing and chirping...we have 15 of them now...the original 6 have all hatched clutches of eggs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 22 May 12 - 09:49 AM

Several feeders, trees, and flowers can be seen from the window next to my computer and I am not sure if I am distracted from the computer by the birds or distracted from the birds by the computer. I get to enjoy both but wish the birds were not so camera shy. Here are some visitors we have had this spring. Hope the link works.

Birds in the Ozarks


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 May 12 - 04:33 PM

I spent the last two weeks in Egypt, and was amazed by all the birds. There were egrets everywhere, especially on our Nile cruise from Luxor to Aswan. I was fascinated by the huge crows - I think they're hooded crows. Best of all, I liked the Pied Kingfishers that I saw along the Nile.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 31 May 12 - 03:27 PM

The American Birding Association urges birdwatchers to keep in mind the
Principles of Birding found at the included link... FYI.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Charley Noble
Date: 31 May 12 - 08:52 PM

We don't usually see small herons in Midcoast Maine, usually just the Great Blue Heron. But the other morning I ran across a small one in the wet spot in the meadow, probably feeding on frogs. It looked most like a Black Crowned Night Heron but it was broad daylight and I would swear that its breast was bright yellow rather than white.

Any thoughts?

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 01 Jun 12 - 06:33 AM

Both pairs of osprey on the Casco Bay side of the park have hatched out chicks. We won't know for another week or two how many, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Charley Noble
Date: 01 Jun 12 - 08:11 AM

Also in Maine:

The eagle nest that may be viewed from the Woolwich-Arrowsic bridge on a nest platform on a small island features an 8-week old chick, looks almost as large as its parents. The osprey nest platform which may be viewed from the same bridge probably has chicks now but we haven't seen them yet. The Taste of Maine nest nearby, which has a webcam, has a couple of chicks which hatched 2 weeks ago.

The eagle nest in the Bar Harbor area, with an eagle cam, finally features two healthy chicks. They've had bad luck there for 3 or 4 years. Hopefully this year will be successful. It's a beautiful nest site.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 02 Jun 12 - 03:05 PM

The birds are going through a a couple of pounds of sunflower seed a day, and a bag of suet nuggets about every 4-5 days. Noticing the finches go for the niger seed only when the sunflower feeders are low or competition for the sunflowers too stiff. This is a change. It may mean I need to scrub the niger feeder. Still only a few goldfinches, which used to be the dominant species at my feeders. I'm wondering if the house finches have simply out competed them to the point they have moved on.

So many juveniles of every species! Today, I have delighted in watching a family of Red-bellied woodpeckers in particular, and the robins at the birdbath. Also a juvenile squirrel and a turtle dove repeatedly facing off on the ground below the feeders.

Heavy rain and storms last night. Weird scratching noises on the carport proved to be 5 Carolina Wrens trying their best to find perches on the inside corners of the carport ceiling, trying to cling to the thin metal wrapping over the edges of the vinyl.

Tomorrow I'll get my butt in gear early, but today is-laze-around-and-just-watch-the-natural-world day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 06 Jun 12 - 01:22 AM

I've been away and haven't had a chance to check which birds are still around in June.

My back yard tally for May is 16:

   1. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
   2. House Sparrow
   3. White-crowned Sparrow
   4. Chipping Sparrow
   5. Lincoln's Sparrow
   6. Savannah Sparrow
   7. Dark-eyed Junco
   8. Evening Grosbeak
   9. Purple Finch
10. House Finch
11. Pine Siskin
12. Northern Flicker
13. Rufus Hummingbird
14. Black-capped Chickadee
15. Wilson's Warbler
16. American Crow

               rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Charley Noble
Date: 06 Jun 12 - 10:34 AM

The recent rains have flooded out two of our favorite osprey nests in Maine, doing in the young chicks. That's the second year in a row for such tragedy. Both nests are located on platforms and evidently they don't drain well. Very sad news.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Beer
Date: 06 Jun 12 - 12:15 PM

Here is a little something that was just sent to me.
Adrien


http://www.cas.umt.edu/geosciences/faculty/langner/Osprey/index.htm


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 06 Jun 12 - 09:37 PM

I have been watching downy woodpeckers at the feeder all year but noticed a few days ago that the red cap on one was different. It is a different color and not located in the same place. Question is this actually a downy or is this a hybrid of some sort. The bird in question should be first picture in the link below.

Woodpecker in question


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 06 Jun 12 - 11:18 PM

It also doesn't have the white back, Arkie. I'm wondering if it is a juvenile, or perhaps a sapsucker? I dunno. You live where you would possibly have some woodpeckers I'd never see here. Hopefully some one else can chime in and help confirm the bird.

The Robins and Bluebirds sure do love splashing around the the birdbath. I guess thrushes are particularly partial to taking a bath among "backyard" birds?

In the fwiw department, I highly recommend a birdbath wiggler. I have three birdbaths, one of which has a wiggler. I actually got it to cut down on mosquitos, which are not inclined to lay eggs in water that is moving a bit, but they work as well as some sort of drip system to attract birds. The one bath with the wiggler gets much, much more traffic than the other 2. I've had mine for 4 years and it just keeps going. A set of fresh D batteries lasts for most of the season. I take the batteries out in winter and retire it. The local Wild Bird Center carries replacement parts like the gasket that seals the battery and motor compartment and the little rubber gaskets with plastic inserts that stir the water. I've replaced the stirring gaskets once, and the seal gasket to the battery/motor compartment is probably in need of replacement now. The motor is still going strong. In other words, quite durable.

I'm gonna go ahead and buy them for the other birdbaths, and am looking at the solar powered ones.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 03:44 AM

One can see the white back as a long white stripe in Arkie's photo. I'd say it's an immature male Downy with characteristic placement of the baby's red head spot. An immature female would look like a smaller version of an adult female; no red on the head.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Beer
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 06:56 AM

Arkie,
That is very interesting. The word "evolution" comes to mind. Are you say maeve that as the bird matures the red spot would move down? Could be I guess.
Ad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Beer
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 07:06 AM

The "Acorn Woodpecker" come close.
We are having fun watching two new nester's. The House Wren is a treat and the Great Crested Flycatcher decided to take up residency.
ad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 07:51 AM

Yes, Adrien. The placement of the red spot changes as the Downy matures and grows adult plumage. It's common for young birds to have quite different plumage from the adults- think of ducklings and chicks in comparison to mature ducks and chickens.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: My guru always said
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 10:41 AM

Suddenly this morning, a young male Sparrowhawk landed in our birdbath with one of our Great Tits in his claws. He looked around smugly for a while, long enough for me to note his features for later identification, and then flew off carrying his prey. Gobsmacked!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 07 Jun 12 - 11:35 AM

Thanks for comments. Looks like maeve nailed it. I suspected as much but have had hybrid juncos and who knows what else. In the link below it looks like the red cap has moved a bit to the back.

Father and son


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 10 Jun 12 - 09:22 PM

Arkie,
Your woodpecker looks like a Downy to me.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 10 Jun 12 - 11:40 PM

I am now convinced that the woodpecker is a juvenile Downy. There have been several juveniles at the feeder the past couple of weeks.

I have had more than 20 house sparrows devouring all my sunflower seeds and suet this summer. They empty the feeders in less than a day and eat a cake of suet every day. I finally quit putting out sunflower seed. I had read that house sparrows do not eat sunflower seed, by apparently these Ozark sparrows can't read. I have started to use a mixture of nuts, seed, and fruit and all the other birds except for the house finches and house sparrows don't mind the change. I am now putting out a lot less food. The woodpeckers that enjoyed the suet are fine with the new seed mixture so we will see how it goes. Now if the house sparrows would just move on to someone else's yard that would be even better. I have been removing their nest from the bluebird boxes and raised a family of bluebirds this spring. I still have some house sparrows in the gourds I put up for Purple Martins and there are some nesting along with Martins in the Martin house.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 10:07 AM

Another bird I cannot identify. Not all that unusual which makes ID a little harder. This bird is not a regular in my yard.   Hope someone here can help.

Unidentified


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Bettynh
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 12:29 PM

A mockingbird has been singing for the last week or so around the clock. Fortunately, he's about a block away. When he chose to sing from my roof, it was hard to sleep.

The Juneberries are ripening - the bush has a constant flow of robins and catbirds. A bird will settle, carefully move to the end of a branch (berries hang off very slim branches) and grab a berry, hopefully before the next arrives to cause a commotion. There are at least two pair of each. I think the catbirds, being slighter, have a bit of advantage. I like the berries ripe, but the birds are harvesting them red. I doubt I'll even find one for a taste, but the entertainment is worth it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 12:53 PM

Arkie- Looks flycatcher-ish. What flycatchers are in your area?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 03:33 PM

Arkie looks like a phoebe to me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 04:54 PM

Saw a Little Egret today in Lyng (Norfolk UK) down at the watermill. White bird like a miniature heron. They aren't from here but I believe now breed quite a bit in this area. Elegant bird!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 09:17 PM

It is a female dark-eyed Junco. Possibly a juvenile female, but juveniles are usually a bit duller. Notice the eyes, the shape of the head, and the color and shape of the beak. Phoebes and flycatchers have dark, narrow beaks.

Saw a house wren digging in a planter this weekend. First one I have seen here.

The starlings and grackles are attacking the suet and nuggets with a vengance. I've tried to keep using them because the woodpeckers and bluebirds like them so well, but I'm gonna have to stop, at least for the time being. If I leave them empty for a few days the starlings go away, but within 2 days of filling them, they are back.

I tried one of those suet feeders in a cage that supposedly larger birds can't get at. Other than the Carolina Wrens, the smaller birds wouldn't go through the wire to get to the suet, and the cage isn't enough distance from the suet cake to keep the starlings and grackles from poking their heads through to get at it. And everybody loves the nugget feeders.

There was a terrible ruckus all morning long as juvenile starlings quarreled among themselves over whose turn it was, with a grackle family occasionally coming along to up the ante. The red-bellied woodpeckers were at the nugget feeder early, but were out-competed by the the others, and went elsewhere for the rest of the day.

Yard full of crows this morning, pecking and digging at something on the ground. Not sure if ants were on the move or if they are going after cicadas that are just starting to emerge from the ground.

The housefinches are outcompeting most other birds at most of my sunflower feeders.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Jeri
Date: 17 Jun 12 - 09:47 PM

The Grey Catbirds are back. I think they're in cahoots with the squirrels and chipmunks, and maybe the mourning doves. The get into the dinner bell feeder and fling seed out until they find something good or give up.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 18 Jun 12 - 06:53 PM

Maeve, Raptor, and Janie, thanks for your suggestions. I think I may have come up with an ID which would not have happened without your direction. I think that the bird is a type of flycatcher. We have Scissor-tails in this area and I frequently see one near where I live. I also see another bird I thought to be some type of flycatcher in that area that I have not previously identified. This I believe to be an Eastern Wood-Peewee. The PeeWee has a dark upper bill but lighter lower bill. Also has a little hook on the end of the bill which my visitor seems to have. The bird does look a lot like a junco but is a little longer in the body which does not show up that well in the photo. Also the juncos left this area in March. The bird also resembles a female Purple Martin which I have nesting in in gourds and in a house in my yard. Have seen juveniles sitting on the fence, but never an adult. I have picked up a few juveniles and set them in trees or in a box I put up for that purpose. Once saw a juvenile Martin flutter and climb from the ground to a ring in the fence several inches above the ground. After a bit of rest, it fluttered and climbed a few inches higher. After about 30 minutes it reached the top of the fence and flew off. Thanks again for your help.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 18 Jun 12 - 10:13 PM

Arkie,

You are the person actually seeing the birds, and are the best person to judge. You also get species that I don't see here in the East and that are not in my Peterson's or Audubon field guides. However, all the Peedees, Flycatchers and Pheobes that I have seen or seen in my field guides have dark, beaks, shaped much differently from what I see in your photo. I also realize there is a lot of light reflecting off the beak in the photo, it perhaps is not as light as it appears in the photograph, and the angle may make the beak appear shorter, broader and more wedge-shaped than it is in actuality. (One of the reasons I prefer the Peterson guides, whether it be birds or plants, to the Audubon guides or other guides that use photographs rather than high quality drawings.)

Based solely on the photo, though, I still vote for a slate-colored/dark-eyed junco.

Terrific photos, btw. You and ragdall both take wonderful pictures.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 19 Jun 12 - 05:34 AM

I can see why Janie is favoring the female Dark-eyed Junco ID,with its broad pink bill, gray throat and lack of wing bars but the white throat, wing bars, lighter lower/hooked dark upper mandibles, and the migration pattern for juncoes, clinch it for me as an Eastern Wood Pewee.

Both species are very familiar to us here, and online image searches are very helpful in terms of showing multiple individuals of each species, which I personally find of more use than books alone.

Thanks, Arkie.

We have nesting Baltimore Orioles on our land for the first time since we moved here; quite a delight to watch as they remove fecal sacs and bring in tidbits. The nest is in one of the tall Black Cherry trees in the apple orchard. There's also a Red-Shouldered Hawk nesting in the edge of the woods near a seasonal brook, and nesting pair of Bald Eagles has moved into the area (since the power company got permission to remove the years-of-active-nesting Osprey nests) in addition to the usual suspects.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 05:32 AM

Duh. Gray throat. It is obvious the bird doesn't have the gray throat and upper breast of a junco. Boy, do I feel silly.

Good lesson on "seeing."


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 06:13 AM

We can all use a "lesson in seeing", Janie. No need to feel foolish as far as I can see. I really appreciate it when a person tells how she came to a conclusion; I always learn from it whether I reach the same conclusion or not!

We're putting out extra nectar and oranges this morning as a bird buffet on two scorchingly hot days. In addition to the hummers and orioles, both Downy and Hairy woodpeckers have been sipping at the feeder in recent days. I put the orange slices high up, since the chipmunk and the red squirrels both crave them -I'd rather the birds got the tasty fruit.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 09:40 AM

I asked for observations and opinions and did not provide a very good example, and am grateful for those who made an effort to help. And the suggestions offered were based upon good reasons. No need for anyone to feel silly. While I am still not 100 per cent sure what this little bird is, the suggestions made here have helped me to "see" things I have missed. After listening, reading, and seeing I am now wondering if the bird in question might be a juvenile, which can make identification just a bit more difficult. One reason for the "juvenile theory" is that the bird was sitting on my fence. Adults of this species have never visited my backyard before. The adults that I have seem who resemble this bird have been on fences and wires next to big open hay fields. One bit I read on the phoebe indicated adults have no wing bars but juveniles do have them. Since this bird does not have the oversized head like many flycatchers, I am now wondering if it may be juvenile eastern phoebe, but am wavering between the phoebe, pewee, and something yet unknown.

While it would have been nice to have a consensus of all in agreement as to the the bird's identity, the variety of suggestions has led me on an interesting journey and I do appreciate the offer of help from all of you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 09:46 AM

Well said, Arkie. I enjoy the looking, the wondering...the journey.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 10:08 PM

I don't mind feeling silly.

Good object lesson, applicable to much more than bird watching.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 20 Jun 12 - 10:17 PM

Having now studied the bird very carefully, studied the bird guides on my bookshelf and on-line, I am absolutely certain of it's identity.

I am absolutely, 100% I have identified the bird in Arkie's photograph.

It is....drum roll......

A Pretty Bird!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 21 Jun 12 - 05:24 AM

Love your sense of humor, Janie! I am in full agreement- it is a Pretty Bird!

Bohemian Waxwings are here looking for berries. We saw an osprey overhead yesterday; we miss the daily flyabouts when Osprey had a nest in the area.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 27 Jun 12 - 10:40 PM

I have been having to refill my hummingbird feeder every other day. That seems excessive. Now I know why.

Thief


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 27 Jun 12 - 11:31 PM

Maeve, you can always come visit Wolfe's Neck for your osprey fix. Of our three nesting pairs, one had nest failure (I suspect a mother raccoon to be the culprit), the pair on the island have three robust looking chicks, and the ones by the river have something in the nest, we just don't have the right angle to view them at.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 28 Jun 12 - 07:11 AM

Arkie, we've been seeing the same thing with our Downy Woodpeckers and the hummer feeder! The Baltimore Oriole nesting pair should be back sipping once the young'uns fledge.

Thanks, ranger1. We've had a single Osprey visitor here this week, a couple of hours after the nesting eagle pair wheeled over.

March Wrens galore, Ravens, Red-Shouldered Hawks still nesting somewhere nearby, a multiplicity of warblers, flickers, Cardinals, waxwings, Goldfinches, Wood Thrushes, Tufted Titmouse, American Robins, Black-Capped Chickadees, many sparrows, Bobolinks, Killdeer, Crows, Eastern Wood Pewee, Eastern Phoebe...bird haven here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 04 Jul 12 - 03:59 PM

Red-shouldered Hawk nestlings have fledged. American Robins are chasing and cursing one of the good-sized young'uns who is calling for Mama from its perch in a birch near the seasonal brook...just inside the woodland.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: EBarnacle
Date: 25 Jul 12 - 09:30 AM

This Sunday, Lady Hillary and I were at a friend's party. A hummingbird hovered briefly over his garden. Then, on Monday, a similar hummingbird made free with our blossoming hibiscus bushes. As the colors were not bold, I have to assume that both were female ruby throated, especially as they are the only type which seems to be geographically correct.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 25 Jul 12 - 03:09 PM

While I wish we had a greater variety of hummingbirds here in the Ozarks, the little Ruby Throats keep me amused and busy filling their feeders. For some reason they have been very active and in a feeding frenzy just before sunset for the past three evenings. Last night all four ports were occupied on the deck feeder, two hummers were waiting their turn and another was hovering at the glass door where I was standing. I though it said they needed another feeder.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 25 Jul 12 - 11:05 PM

This season's batch of juvenile squirrels are proving very inventive and resourceful at the bird feeders. The arrangements that have worked for the past two years (for me and the birds, anyway), are going to have to be revisited.

This has been a remarkably successful breeding and rearing spring and summer for both squirrels and birds in these parts. Continues to be interesting to watch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 26 Jul 12 - 06:15 AM

Saw 8 Black Throated Divers (Loons) on our wee loch last week. never seen so many together at once before.
Also a Meadow Pipit has taken to visiting one of our bird tables.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 26 Jul 12 - 08:32 AM

Two of the young osprey started flying last week, waiting for the third any day now. Those are the ones on the island. The mainland nest near the salt marsh didn't fare well this year - something got them shortly after they hatched, probably the female raccoon with a den and little ones in a tree about 100 feet away from the nest. In the meantime, we've discovered two more nests, one on the river side of the park, and a fourth in a wooded, hilly area between two trails. Both are active nests, but we have no way of knowing how many young ones without getting close enough to disturb them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 10 Aug 12 - 07:27 PM

For the past 10 days have been observing a female cardinal with a completely bald head. She otherwise looks and seems healthy and active. I've never seen this before, but apparently it is not entirely uncommon, especially with Northern Cardinals and Blue Jays. Found one interesting article. http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~insrisg/nature/nw98/baldbirds.html . Haven't yet followed the couple of links to other articles at the end of the one posted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joybell
Date: 11 Aug 12 - 05:57 PM

I've been away doing things but birds always catch my attention.
Down on our Shipwreck Coast, in Victoria, Australia, I just saw my first Rufus Bristlebird. Drably clad but with a wild ginger toupee. Heard my first baby Magpie for the season. The adults have been courting all night for a month.
Joy


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 11 Aug 12 - 09:42 PM

I see so much more (and so many more birds and other wildlife) on those weekends I have time to sit out on the carport during the day. The feeders are great to observe, and all but one are positioned so that I can see them from inside the house - the front of the house since all the back windows are bedroom or bath windows. The carport, which I use as a covered patio, is on the back of the house. From there I can observe the neighbors yards and the woods across the road - just slightly different habitats, but what a difference "slightly different" can make!


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Aug 12 - 10:25 PM

I had a nice chat with my dad this evening. My dad was born in 1919, same year as Pete Seeger. We were talking birds, and my dad said he's been seeing a bald eagle this year, near his home in Sarasota, Florida. We remembered the biggest birdwatching event of my childhood, seeing a snowy owl on the neighbor's television antenna on Wind Point in Racine, Wisconsin - about 1960. I think that's what started my lifelong enjoyment of birdwatching.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ranger1
Date: 12 Aug 12 - 12:14 AM

While setting up for today's nature program, I was startled to hear a splash from about 30 feet away. One of the juvenile ospreys was trying her hand at fishing for the first time. She dove five or six times - no fish, but she's getting the hang of the whole soar/hover/dive thing. Maybe she'll have better luck tomorrow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 20 Oct 12 - 10:21 AM

The white-throated sparrows are back. No juncos yet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 21 Oct 12 - 06:15 AM

My dark eyed juncos have been back for about two weeks.(Ontario )
Raptor


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 26 Oct 12 - 07:51 PM

First dark eyed juncos of the season sighted today in the Arkansas Ozarks. First freeze of this winter predicted for tonight. What timing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Raptor
Date: 26 Oct 12 - 07:54 PM

I got about 60 pine siskins today


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 26 Oct 12 - 08:04 PM

I only really get to see "who" is here on the weekends. Gonna be cool and rainy so should be a good weekend to watch the feeders.

I cleaned and sanitized all the feeders last weekend. Seems the woodpeckers prefer them gunky and moldy. Suet/nugget feeders haven't been touched since.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 03:45 PM

It was almost dark last night and there was a bird on the pave ahead of me. When I got close, it lifted and flew into a pine. A woodcock! In the city! In November! Unheard of on both counts! I stood in amazement staring at the pine tree for nearly a minute and then walked toward the pine in hope it might flush again but it didn't (not that it would, of course, unless I rustled the pine and then it have exited on the opposite side... of course). I told one of my buddies today and he asked if I was losing it. I really don't think he believed me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: maeve
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 05:09 PM

Gnu- That's wonderful. I'm so glad you saw the woodcock. Lots of folks wouldn't have known what it was.

We have a second Great Blue Heron spending time here. It lands in our drive and then lifts and swings down to the stream. Great Horned Owl has moved in closer than it's been in the last many years. Coyotes have been keeping the night air full of music. Canada Geese and ducks wheel by several times a week, and Evening Grosbeaks have graced our feeders this week as well, in addition to the usual suspects.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 08:30 PM

Herons are fascinating. I miss getting out to my buddy's place to watch them. MANY, as he lives on the shore just east of Shediac, NB. Any day, upwards of 100.

Minds me of the shore when I was a boy. Out to the wharf after supper in late August to get ready to fish smelt and mackerel. Tommy cod were plentiful and good practice for a lad of about ten. Catch em and feed em to a young gull... until it ate so much it couldn't fly when the tide came in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 10:36 PM

gnu and maeve, I envy both of you.   

maeve, your visitors must be a source of great enjoyment. If two herons are staying around, there must be a plentiful food source in your stream? Evening Grosbeaks are so beautiful. The few I had seem to have moved on. The sunflower seed feeder seldom needs a refill these days.

gnu, What a wonderful sighting, a less observant person would have assumed it was a more common bird. I wonder if Sandy forced the Woodcock to move north, either the storm itself, or the damage to formerly suitable wintering grounds along the US East Coast? It will be interesting to see if other "unusual" birds will show up in your area this season.

We've had an unusually high number of Snowy Owls in North central BC, many appear to be this year's birds. Last Wednesday I was able to get out for a drive with my little camera to photograph this one. http://www.flickr.com/photos/diffuse/8186908324/

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 04:44 PM

Yet another beautiful pic, rags. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: bubblyrat
Date: 20 Nov 12 - 05:42 AM

Lots of waterfowl , not surprisingly ,here at the confluence of the rivers Severn and Avon ; plenty of Mallard ,of course, and a good many hybrids with interesting ( and sometimes bizarre ) plumage ,body-sizes ,etc. Swans, naturally,which sometimes do a "fly by " below the level of our sitting-room window ; great to see and hear !
            Moorhens occasionally paddle by fussilly,but I haven't seen any Coots or Canada Geese (thankfully !) yet.A pair of Kingfishers have flown by,too , and there are plenty of Gulls ; large flocks of the common ones ,and screaming,noisy,quarrelsome Terns when the "Duck-bread" appears on the water.Cormorants seem to like this area also,being regularly seen fluttering ( it's the only way I can describe their precarious flight ) overhead . And lots of Crows in the water meadows,of course , especially where the Sheepen have grazed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Dec 12 - 01:37 PM

Finally, the dark-eyed juncos are back.

Well - at least one is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Dec 12 - 04:54 PM

Was looking for recipes for adding my own hot pepper to suet nuggets when I stumbled across this injunction to not use it. Can't find the hot pepper version of the nuggets locally anymore.

Had no idea capsaicin is harmful to bees, which would be an issue if using hot pepper sprays to deter deer.

I think I'll continue to use hot pepper suet cakes, and when I can find them, the hot pepper nuggets. I certainly have never noticed any problems with the birds avoiding them or behaving in a distressed manner while or after feeding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Dec 12 - 05:25 PM

duh..... the link.


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 22 Dec 12 - 03:37 PM

I watched a robin haul a worm outta my back lawn today! 22 December! He didn't need to have his parka on needer! D'ya spose winter in NB, Canada is over?


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 22 Dec 12 - 07:08 PM

Wow, gnu, lucky you! We have -24 C windchill and the lawn is so far below snow that nobody can find it.

The snow pack has been a huge problem for the displaced Snowy Owls who moved down here from the Arctic, hoping to find something to eat. People have been finding them dead or too weak to fly and dying.   I'm guessing that the numbers that are being turned into the the gov't wildlife office are just a fraction of how many dead owls are out there where people won't find them.

It's a very sad situation to see these beautiful birds dying, they've bred too successfully and overpopulated themselves out of food.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: gnu
Date: 22 Dec 12 - 07:25 PM

OH rags! That is SO sad.

Maybe this might cheer a bit, tho I can't see that it would under such dire straights.

Anyway...

I heard they found about 200 dead crows near Moncton, and there was concern they may have died from Avian Flu.

They had a Bird Pathologist examine the remains of all the crows, and he confirmed the problem was definitely NOT Avian Flu, to everyone's relief. However, he determined that 98% of the crows had been killed by impact with trucks, and only 2% were killed by an impact with a car.

The Province then hired an Ornithological Behaviorist to determine the disproportionate percentages for truck versus car kill.

The Ornithological Behaviorist determined the cause in short order.
When crows eat road kill, they always set-up a look-out crow in a nearby tree to warn of impending danger. His conclusion was that the lookout crow could say "Caw" but he could not say "Truck."


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 09:08 AM

Here's my 2012 list. I'm on the northeast Piedmont of North Carolina. A fairly large lot in a pretty small town. Lots of trees, but not much shrubbery or trees with berries or drupes. No ponds or waterways, and not situated between ponds or waterways so I don't get to see waterbirds passing overhead from my yard. 7 bird feeders and I feed black oil sunflower seed, nyjer seed, suet cakes and suet nuggets. this year, the finches have almost completely ignored the nyjer for some reason and I also saw a lot fewer goldfinches and a lot fewer juncos.

Janie's 2012 Backyard Bird List.

American Crow
American Goldfinch
American Robin
Barred Owl
Black Vulture
Bluejay
Brown Thrasher
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Chickadee
Chipping Sparrow
common grackle
Cowbird
Dark-eyed Junco
Downy Woodpecker
Eastern Bluebird
European Starling
Gray Catbird
Hairy Woodpecker
House Wren
House Finch
Mourning Dove
Myrtle Warbler
Northern Cardinal
Northern Flicker
Northern Harrier
Pine Warbler
Purple Finch
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-shouldered hawk
Screech Owl
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Song Sparrow
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
White-breasted nuthatch
White-throated sparrow


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: ragdall
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 07:28 AM

Wow, Janie! That's a very impressive list.

gnu, cute joke. I think those crows have east coast accents?

I was thrilled to see my first Common Redpoll of this winter eating millet outside my window this afternoon. It just barely made it onto my 2012 list. I will try to sort out the list in a couple of days, after my son and his family leave for home.

rags


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Arkie
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 12:01 PM

Here's a list from the southern tip of the Ozarks and north Central Arkansas, about 100 miles north of Little Rock and a 100 miles below the Missouri border. Situated on the outskirts of a small town with quite a bit of open space on one side of the house and hardwoods and pine on the other. Fortunate also to have close neighbors with stock ponds. Wish I could be more specific about the blackbird. Brewer's, I think, but not really sure. The Piliated Woodpecker only dropped by for one day, but hung around long enough for me to get a few pictures.

Blackbird
Bluebird
Blue Heron
Blue Jay
Canadian Goose
Brown Thrasher
Cardinal
Carolina Wren
Carolina Chickadee
Cowbird
Crow
Dove, Eurasian Collared
Dove, Mourning
Dove, White Winged
Eastern Wood PeeWee
Finch, House
Finch, Purple
Flycatcher, Scissor-tailed
Goldfinch
Hawk, Cooper's
Grackle
Grosbeak, Blue
Grosbeak, Rose Breasted
Hummingbird, Ruby Throated
Indigo Bunting
Junco
Junco Hybrid
Killdeer
Mockingbird
Northern Parula
Nuthatch, Brown-headed
Nuthatch, Red-Breasted
Nuthatch, White Breasted
Pine Siskin
Pine Warbler
Purple Martin
Sparrow, Chipping
Sparrow, House
Sparrow, White Crowned
Sparrow, White Throated
Redwing Blackbird
Robin
Starling
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Buzzard
Yellow Shafted Flicker
Yellow Warbler
Woodpecker, Downy
Woodpecker, Hairy
Woodpecker, Piliated
Woodpecker, Red-Bellied


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Subject: RE: BS: Birdwatching 2012
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 12:46 PM

Nice one, Arkie!   Thanks for giving the info about location and habitat around your yard.

Oops. I have two more to add that I somehow left off my list. Ruby-throated Humingbird and Northern Mockingbird.

Eager to learn what the rest of you have spied from your yard or chosen observation place over the course of the past year.


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