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Lyr Req: Dinah and Villikens

DigiTrad:
JOE BOWERS
MASTER MCGRATH
SWEET BETSY FROM PIKE
THE POKEGAMA BEAR
VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Sweet Betsy from Pike (25)
Help: Origin of Villikins&Dinah tune (16)
(origins) Origins: Master McGrath (60)
Lyr Req: Villikins & his Dinah: songs using tune (68)
(origins) Origins: They Died as they Lived (1)
Lyr Add: Little Dame Crump (2)
Where is Pike (as in 'Sweet Betsy from.. (22)
Sweet Betsy From Pike - refrain??? (50)
Info on: Master McGrath (14)
This remind you of Villikins & Dinah? (13)
SFTD-Pokegama Bear-11/17 (16)


allan S 05 Oct 99 - 09:58 PM
05 Oct 99 - 10:05 PM
05 Oct 99 - 10:11 PM
raredance 05 Oct 99 - 10:18 PM
Steve Parkes 06 Oct 99 - 03:55 AM
Steve Parkes 06 Oct 99 - 04:00 AM
Penny S. 06 Oct 99 - 01:50 PM
06 Oct 99 - 06:01 PM
Kernow John 06 Oct 99 - 06:58 PM
allan S. 06 Oct 99 - 07:33 PM
Steve Parkes 07 Oct 99 - 03:23 AM
Penny S. 07 Oct 99 - 11:25 AM
Steve Parkes 07 Oct 99 - 12:15 PM
Allan S. 07 Oct 99 - 01:17 PM
Steve Parkes 08 Oct 99 - 03:32 AM
Kernow John 08 Oct 99 - 04:19 PM
Penny S. 08 Oct 99 - 06:30 PM
Penny S. 08 Oct 99 - 06:31 PM
GUEST 12 Oct 09 - 05:26 PM
MGM·Lion 12 Oct 09 - 09:23 PM
dick greenhaus 12 Oct 09 - 10:55 PM
Joe Offer 12 Oct 09 - 11:27 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Oct 09 - 10:16 AM
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Subject: Dinah and Villikins
From: allan S
Date: 05 Oct 99 - 09:58 PM

Does anyone know the song "Dinah and Villikins" 1st verse as follows:

There was a rich merchant in London did dwell
He had but one daughter an uncommon young Girl
Her name it was Dinnah just 16 years old
and she had a large fortune in silver and gold

She rejects suitor for young Villikens Who finds her dead in the garden with a cup of cold poison by her side Moral: "'tis better to die and grow cold than to marry a suitor for silver and gold" It sounds as tho it could have written by John J. Niles or Richard Dying Bennet who "found it in the southern Mts. Who wrote it??? Is it traditional or what???


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From:
Date: 05 Oct 99 - 10:05 PM

We just had a thread on it a fe days ago, and its in DT. Search for Dinah. Vilikins was the original spelling, but there are others used also.


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From:
Date: 05 Oct 99 - 10:11 PM

Sorry, the thread wasn't here, but on rec.music.folk. To see 19the century copies go to

www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/ballads

and click on Browse/Search in the left column. On the top line of the search box that come up put Dinah, and follow directions to see big GIFs of broadside copies.


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: raredance
Date: 05 Oct 99 - 10:18 PM

Vilikins and his Dinah is credited to John Parry. It was a popular music hall song in London and gained great popularity in the USA in the 1850s. The tune gained even greater acceptance as a vehical for all manner of mosstly amusing songs. You can find the version in the DT by searching "Villikins" which is a misspelling of Vilikins as it appears on an early sheet music publication of the song. rich r


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 03:55 AM

"Vilikins" = "Wilkins", believe it or not. In the cockney of Dickens' time, V and W were switched, so "very white" became "werry vite" (phonetic spelling!). Also, comic songs (and sea shanties) tended to insert extra syllables, whence the intrusive second "i" in Vilikins. The first line of the song (by the way, I think it was by Mark Sheridan, but I may be completely wrong!) goes "It's of a rich merchiant this story I tell". Let's see how much I can remember ...

It's of a rich merchiant this story I tell,
Who had but one daughter, an uncommon fine young gel,
Whose name it vas Dinah, just sixteen years old,
Vith a werry large fortin [fortune] in silwer and gold.
Singing ... [there is some patter before each chorus, which I've forgotten]
Too-ra-lie oo-ra-lie or-ra-lie-ay.

[Switch your own v's and w's from here!]

Now, as Dinah was a walliking [walking] in the garding one day -
{spoken] it was the front garding -
Her father came to her and to her did say:
"Go dress your self, Dinah, in gorge-i-ous array, I will find you a husiband both galliant and gay."
Singing ...

"Oh father, dear father," young Dinah replied,
"I don't feel inclined for to be marri-eyed,
And all my large fortin I'd gladly give o'er
If you'd let me stay single a year or two more."

[verse missing]

Now, as Vilikins was a walliking in the garden one day -
[spoken] it was the back garden -

... and now it's gone completely, I'm afraid; except for the end of the last verse:
With a bill-dow what said as how by pizen [poison] they died.

"Billy-dow" = billet-doux (French) meaning a love-letter (not a French letter!). It's basically Romeo and Juliet in modern dress, but with more jokes. Actually, the last verse is not the final one; there was a "morial" (moral), and there were two extra morals added, I suspect through public demand. The first morial is that this is what happens when you go against parental orders; the second is that this is what happens when parients (sic) go against the hearts of their children.

Steve


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 04:00 AM

Just remembered ... the first morial contains the wonderful word "conskivence" (in conskivence of ...); see if you can work out what it means! (Hint: use a bit of metathesis!)

Steve


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Penny S.
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 01:50 PM

Missing verse: (I think)

"Go go boldest daughter," the pariant he cried, "If you don't feel inclined to be this young man's bride, I'll give all my vast fortune to the nearest of kin, And you shan't reap the benefit, not of one single pin."

And, ...

Now as Villikins was a waliking the garding around, He spied his dear Dinah lying dead upon the ground, With a cup of cold poison lying down by her side, And a billy-dow to say how twas by poison she died.


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From:
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 06:01 PM

We used to sing a version of this many years ago-like 35 or40- which accounts for the lack of memory, but I'm sure that the last verse was a warning to other girls and finished "Remember Vilikins and his Dinah, not forgetting the pizen"


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Kernow John
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 06:58 PM

Allan.S.
I have the words, music and chords if you need them.
Leave a message here.
Regards Baz


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: allan S.
Date: 06 Oct 99 - 07:33 PM

Thanks every one I also sang it 50 of so years ago. Just going over all my notes on scraps of paper and ran into it Allan


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 07 Oct 99 - 03:23 AM

50 years ago,Allan? You look much younger than that on the Mudcat! And Baz, if Allan doesn't ask you to post the words and music, I will!

Steve


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Penny S.
Date: 07 Oct 99 - 11:25 AM

Remembering line breaks this time. (Please excuse above - inspection looming, world collapsing).

Now all you young maidens, don't you thus fall in love, nor
Do that not by no means despised by your guvnor
And all you young (men ? doesn't scan), mind who you claps your eyes on,
Remember Villikins and his Dinah, not forgetting the pizon.

Penny


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 07 Oct 99 - 12:15 PM

Sing "all" for two beats instead of one, and it'll work.


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Allan S.
Date: 07 Oct 99 - 01:17 PM

THanks again. I love the last 2 verses Will sing it At our next house Hoot where it is expected that I will sing a song with DEATH AND Dying. Steve Parks who ever you are I am 71 and still going strong. Am going over all my old notes and music from my courting days. Which were used to win the hearts and minds[never mind hearts and minds] It was their bodies I was after of the ladies. Remember what ever you can think of, we old farts have done already.

Allan S.


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 03:32 AM

Allan, old farts have been telling me that all my life! I'm not sure at 48 I qualify for OF status, despite my little brother's claims.

Steve


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Subject: Lyr/Chords/Tune Add: VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH
From: Kernow John
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 04:19 PM

VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH

Now [C] Dina was a [G7] walking her [C]garden one day {walliking, gardin}
Her papa came [D7]to her and [G]thus he did say {'er papa}
Go [Am]dress yourself [Em]Dina in [F]gorgeous [C]array {gorgeeus}
And get you a [G7]husband both [C]gallant and gay {git, husiband bofe, galliant}
With a too-ra li-[G7]oora li-[C]oora li ay.

Oh papa Oh papa I've not made up my mind
And to marry just yet why I don't feel inclined
To you my large fortune I'll gladly give o'er {fortitune, ower }
If you'll let me live single a year or two more {sinigle mower }
With....

Go go boldest daughter the parent replied (parient }
If you won't consent to be this here young mans bride {'ere}
I'll give your large fortune to the nearest of kin
And you shan't reap the benefit of one single pin
With.....

As Villikens was a walking the garden around {araand}
He spied his dear Dinah lying dead on the ground Graand}
And a cup of cold pizen it lay by her side
With a billet-doux what stated 'twas by pizen she died {wiv wot }
With....

He kissed her cold corpus a thousand times o'er {corpius, fousand }
And called her his Dinah though she was no more
Then swallowed the pizen like a lover so brave {luvver }
Now Villikens and his Dinah both lie in one grave
With...

Now all you young maidens take warning by her
Never not by no means nohow disobey your governor {guv'ner}
And all you young fellows mind who you claps eyes on
Think of Villikins and his Dinah and the cup of cold pizen. {fink }

X: 1
T:Villikins and His Dinah
M:3/4
L:1/4
K:C
C/C/|CEG|GFE/E/|D/D/CB,|CzC|
CCEG|ccc/c/|B/B/GG|GzG|
cccBGE|FGA|GzC/D/|
EEE|GFD|DCC|Cz||!
C/D/|EEE|GFD|DCC|Cz||

% Output from ABC2Win Version 2.1 f on 08/10/99

Regards Baz


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Subject: Lyr Add: VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH
From: Penny S.
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 06:30 PM

Baz has stirred the memory cells, and the entire version has surfaced. It is different from the DT one, and has different variations from Baz's. I don't remember where I found it, possibly the New National Song Book. Definitely in print form, though.

Now 'tis of a rich merchant I'm a-going for to tell,
Who had for a daughter an uncommon fine young gel,
Her name it was Dinah, just sixteen years old,
With a very large fortune in siliver and gold.
Cho. Singing Toorali toorali toorali ay

As Dinah was a-waliking in the garding one day,
Her father comes up to her and thus to her did say,
"Go dress yourself Dinah in gorgeous array,
And I'll bring you a husbiand both galliant and gay."

"Oh father, dear father, the daughter she said,
"I don't feel inclined to be marry-i-ed,
And the whole of my vast fortune I'd gladly give ower
If I could live single a year or two more."

"Go, go boldest daughter," the pariant he cried,
"If you don't feel inclined to be this young man's bride,
I'll give all of your fortune to the nearest of kin,
And you shan't reap the benefit, not of one single pin."

As Villikins was a-walikin the garding around,
He spied his dear Dinah lying dead upon the ground,
With a cup of cold pizen lying down by her side,
And a billy-dow to say how 'twas by pizen she died.

Then he kissed her cold corposus a thousand times ower,
And called her his dear Dinah, though she was no more,
Then he swallowed all the pizen, and sang one last stave,
Now Villikins and his Dinah lie together in one grave.

Now all you young maidens don't you thus fall in love, nor
Do that not by no means despised by your guvnor,
And all you young men, (you) mind who you clap your eyes on,
Remember Villikins and his Dinah, not forgetting the pizen.

Penny


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Subject: RE: Dinah and Villikens
From: Penny S.
Date: 08 Oct 99 - 06:31 PM

Correction I think the chorus was "Singing Toorali, oorali, oorali, ay


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dinah and Villikens
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 05:26 PM

Freda Palmer, who was from Leafield in Oxfordshire finished Villikins and Dinah off with the following verse, which I think is better than the moral:

Twelve o'clock the next night in a tall poplar tree
The ghost of young Dinah her parents did see
Arm in arm with young Villikins and both looking blue
Saying we wouldn't have been poisoned if it hadn't been for you.

Freda's gorgeous version is on a Veteran CD, "It was on a market day" (2). She sings it very "straight", without any mockneyisms.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dinah and Villikens
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 09:23 PM

One of most widely reused tunes of all, except praps for Battle·Hymn/John·Browns·Body ? used for Sweet Betsy From Pike, Soft Tomatoes [thread qv], &c.

Literary note: readers of Carroll's Alice will remember that Alice's cat in Thru the looking-Glass is called Dinah. The Liddells [the original Alice's family] also had a cat called Villikins; so the song was widely enough known to be used as a sort of family joke by the family of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dinah and Villikens
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 10:55 PM

Alan-
It's not only in Digitrad, but there's a link to it at the top of this very thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Dinah and Villikens
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 11:27 PM

Ah, but Dick, remember that Allan posted his request in 1999...


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Subject: Lyr Add: VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH (1847)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 10:16 AM

Here's the oldest version I can find in Google Books:

From Songs of Ireland and Other Lands [Anonymous] (New York: D. & J. Sadlier & Co., 1847), page 221:


VILLIKINS AND HIS DINAH.

'Tis of a rich merchant who in London did dwell,
He had but one daughter, an unkimmon nice young gal;
Her name it was Dinah, scarce sixteen years old,
With a very large fortune in silver and gold.
Too ral lal, loo ral lal, too ral lal la.
Chorus for the silver and gold.
Too ral lal, etc.

As Dinah was a valiking in the garden one day,
Her papa he came to her, and thus he did say:
"Go dress thyself, Dinah, in gorgeous array,
And take yourself a husband both galliant and gay."
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for the expectant husband.
Too ral lal, etc.

Spoken.?This is what the infant progedy said to the author of her being.

"O, papa, O, papa, I've not made up my mind,
And to marry just yet, why, I don't feel inclined;
To you my large fortune I'll gladly give o'er,
If you'll let me live single a year or two more."
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for the suppliant maiden.
Too ral lal, etc.

Spoken.?This is what the indignant parient replied?I represent the father.

"Go, go, boldest daughter," the parient replied;
"If you won't consent to be this here young man's bride,
I'll give your large fortune to the nearest of kin,
And you shan't reap the benefit of one single pin."
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for indignant parient?very bass.
Too ral lal, etc.

Spoken.?Now comes the conflabbergastation of the lovyer.

As Vilikins was valiking the garden around,
He spied his dear Dinah laying dead upon the ground,
And a cup of cold pison it lay by her side,
With a billet-dux a stating 'twas by pison she died.
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for the chemist round the corner, where the pison was bought.
Too ral lal, etc.

Spoken.?This is what the lovyer did.

He kissed her cold corpus a thousand times o'er,
And called her his Dinah, though she was no more,
Then swallowed the pison like a lovyer so brave,
And Vilikins and his Dinah lie both in one grave.
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for the disconsolate lovyer.
Too ral lal, etc.

MORAL.
Now, all you young maidens, take warning by her,
Never not by no means disobey your governor;
And all you young fellows mind who you clap eyes on,
Think of Vilikins and Dinah and the cup of cold pison.
Too ral lal, etc.
Chorus for pisoned people.
Too ral lal, etc.


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