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Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal

*#1 PEASANT* 21 Jan 12 - 09:19 PM
GUEST,999 21 Jan 12 - 10:02 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 21 Jan 12 - 10:16 PM
GUEST,999 21 Jan 12 - 10:30 PM
GUEST,julia L 21 Jan 12 - 11:03 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 22 Jan 12 - 01:20 AM
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Subject: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 09:19 PM

Having difficulty finding this tune
abc will work

Many many thanks for your kind assistance.

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: GUEST,999
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 10:02 PM

http://www.thomasbending.co.uk/mm/by_title.htm

That site lists it as Come, Let's Away to the Bridal


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 10:16 PM

Thanks!
no trace of tune there or tune title elsewhere

on we go...

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: GUEST,999
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 10:30 PM

A Google of

"Come let's away to the bridal hall"

shows it as being a poem from before 1835.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: GUEST,julia L
Date: 21 Jan 12 - 11:03 PM

Fie let us to the Bridal = Jock will be married to Jenny, the lass wi' the golden hair circa 1730

X:43
T:Fy let us a' to the Bridal.
S:AIRD Airs
M:9/8
L:1/8
S:Aird
N:same tune found as early as 1705; text is late 17th century
K:EMin
D|GAG Gge dBG|ABA ABd Te2g|GAG gfe dBG|ABc BAG E2::
d|gdg gag fed|edB gab a2b|gab abg fed|efg dBG A2:|

SONG XVI.
THE BLYTHSOME "BRIDAL."
BY FRANCIS SEMPLE OF BELTREES.

Fy, let us all to the brid - del,
For there will be lilt - ing there;
For Jockie'sto be mar-ried to Mag-gie,
The lass with the gaud - en hair.
And there will be lang-kail and pot - tage,
And ban-nocks of bar - ley meal,
And there will be good salt her - ring,
To rel - ish a cog of good ale.

Fy, let us all to the brid-del,
For there will be lilt - ing there ;
For jockie 's to be married to Maggie,
The lass with the gaud - en hair.

And there will be Sandie the sutor,
And Willie with the meikle mow ;
And there will be Tom the ploutter,
And Andrew the tinkler I trow.
And there will be bow-legged Robbie,
With thumbless Katie's gudeman ;
And there will be blue-cheeked Dallie,
And Lawrie the laird of the land.

Fy, let us all, &c.

And there will be sow-libber Peatie,
And plouckie-faced Wat in the mill,
Capper-nosed Gibbie, and Francie,
That wons in the how of the hill ;
And there will be Alaster-Dowgal,
That splee-fitted Bessie did woo,
And sneevling Lillie, and Tibbie,
And Kirstie, that belly-god sow.

Fy, let us all, &c.

And Crampie that married Stainie,
And coft him breeks to his arse, "
Wha after was" hanged for stealing,
Great mercy it hapned no warse :
And there will be fairntickled Hew,
And Bess with the lily-white leg,
That "gade" to the south for breeding,
And bang'd up her wame in Mons-meg.'*

Fy, let us all, &c.

And there will be Geordie McCowrie,
And blinking daft Barbra and Mag,
And there will be blencht Gillie-whimple,
And pewter-faced flitching Joug ;
And there will be happer-arsed Nanzie,
And fairy-faced Jeanie be name,
Gleed Katie, and fat-lugged Lizzie,
The lass with the gauden wame.

Fy, let us all, &c.

And there will be girn-again Gibbie,
And his glaked wife Jeanie Bell,
And mizlie-chinn'd flyting Geordie,
The lad that was skipper himsel'.
There 11 be all the lads and the lasses,
Set down in the midst of the Ha',
With sybows, and rysarts, and carlings,
That are both sodden and raw.

Fy, let us all, &c. *

There will be tartan, dragen and brachen,
And fouth of good gappocks o' skate,
Pow-sodie, and drammock, and crowdie,
And callour nout feet in a plate ;
And there will be partans and buckies,
Speldens and haddocks anew,
And sing'd sheep-heads, and a haggize,
And scadlips to sup till ye 're fow.

Fy, let us all, &c.

There will be good lapper'd-milk kebbucks,
And sowens, and farles and baps,
With swats, and well-scraped paunches,
And brandie in stoups and in caps :
And there will be meal-kail and castocks,
And skink to sup till you rive;
And rosts to rost on a brander
Of flouks that was taken alive.

Fy, let us all, &c.

Scrapt haddocks, wilks, dulse, and tangle,
And a mill o' gude sneeshin' to prie;
Then weary with eating and'drinking,
We 'II rise up and dance till we die.
Fy, let us all to the briddel,
For there will be lilting there ;
For Jockie's to be married to Maggie,
The lass with the gauden hair.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Fie, Let's away to the Bridal
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 22 Jan 12 - 01:20 AM

amazing! Many thanks
here is the song

Blind Willie V. Billy Scott, 1829, Thomas Marshall, 1806-1866, Tune?Fie, let's away to the Bridal
BLIND WILLIE, one morning, was singin'
At the sign o' the "Bunch o' Grapes,"
Te amuse the folks he was beginnin'
Wi' aud Sir Matthew's mistakes.
Sumbody shoots, "Here's Mister Scott cummin!"
Willie instantly wished for te see;
"Aw'll tell ye the truth, withoot funnin,
He once half-a-croon gav te me!"
Fal lal, etc.

Willie now thowt they were gamin,
For Mister Scott's cummin seem'd lang,
Till he heard a voice gravely exclaimin,
"Poor William !?poor blind man!"
Willie bawls oot?" Ye canna deceive me !?
Ye needn't think aw'm se silly;
Aw's not such a feul, ye'll believe me,?
It's not Mister Scott, but Cull Billy!"
Fal lal, etc.

"Blind man, come, don't be so mulish,
If I'm silly, no doubt I'm not right;
You for to say that I'm foolish!
Thank God! I'm endued with my sight! "
But, Cull Billy, what browt ye here now?
Nebody can say that it's reet.
Gan away, or aw'll blind ye wi' beer now,
For cummin te myek gam o' maw seet!"
Fal lal, etc.

"You stand on a groundless foundation,
What else can such as you think?
You indulge yourself in dissipation,
You are both blind and stupid with drink
Willie sat an' heard Cull Billy pratting,
Quite heedless tiv a' the abuse:
His hand on his knee he kept clapping?
"Cull Billy's cum fra the madhoose!"
Fal lal, etc.

Billy now turned quite ootrageous,
At Blind Willie's nose tuik a grip:
His haud he suin disengages,
For Willie began hard te kick.
Willie still gav him greet provocation,
His raillery still wadn't cease;
Billy went oot wiv a vile execration,
Te gan tiv a justice for peace.
Fal lal, etc

Willie fand hissel reythur twisted,
His nose was beginnin te bleed;
He wad gan te the Mayor, he insisted,
And let his reet worshipful see'd.
Willie oft loodly did grummel?
"The divil brust Cull Billy's bags:
When the aud wife let the pie tummel,
He sat doon an' dined on the flags!"
Fal lal, etc.

Willie tuik a consideration,
He thowt the subject shud drop;
He allowed he'd gi'en provocation,
But further mischief he wad stop.
Te finish the pack, anuther gill he got,
But with an oath he did declare,
The varry first time he saw Billy Scott,
He wad take him before Mister Mayor.
Fal lal, etc.
-Marshall, Thomas, Author's Edition, 1829. In: Allan, Thomas and George, Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings, 1891.
The song forms part of a 24 page song book, published in 1829, that appears to be the only known work of Thomas Marshall. Marshall was born in Newcastle and served his apprenticeship as a brush-maker in Pilgrim Street. At the age of 21 this collection of his songs was published by William Fordyce of Dean Street, two of the songs, 'Euphy's coronation' and 'Blind Willie' going on to enjoy relative popularity for a number of years following. It is not clear if Marshall ceased composing after this, or simply if none of his other work has survived - certainly Thomas Allan in his 1891 edition of 'Allan's Tyneside songs' noted that 'if he wrote anything after this it is untraced, as nothing appears to have found its way into local collections'. Thomas Marshall died on 29th December, 1866 at his house in Shieldfield, Tyneside.-farne archive


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