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BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7

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ChrisJBrady 23 Jan 12 - 01:08 PM
ChrisJBrady 23 Jan 12 - 01:12 PM
ChrisJBrady 23 Jan 12 - 01:23 PM
ChrisJBrady 23 Jan 12 - 02:43 PM
GUEST,Ian Hendrie 23 Jan 12 - 07:23 PM
ChrisJBrady 25 Jan 12 - 08:00 AM
Jim Carroll 25 Jan 12 - 08:32 AM
Ian Hendrie 25 Jan 12 - 09:19 AM
Jim Carroll 25 Jan 12 - 10:28 AM
ChrisJBrady 25 Jan 12 - 11:57 AM
ChrisJBrady 25 Jan 12 - 12:00 PM
Sandra in Sydney 26 Jan 12 - 03:30 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 26 Jan 12 - 10:24 AM
ChrisJBrady 26 Jan 12 - 04:29 PM
ChrisJBrady 26 Jan 12 - 04:43 PM
Mark Dowding 27 Jan 12 - 03:01 AM
Jim Carroll 27 Jan 12 - 04:38 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 27 Jan 12 - 12:41 PM
Jim Carroll 27 Jan 12 - 01:54 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 27 Jan 12 - 03:54 PM
Jim Carroll 28 Jan 12 - 03:20 AM
Ian Hendrie 28 Jan 12 - 05:57 AM
Jim Carroll 28 Jan 12 - 06:42 AM
Ian Hendrie 28 Jan 12 - 06:45 AM
Jim Carroll 28 Jan 12 - 08:04 AM
ChrisJBrady 28 Jan 12 - 01:54 PM
Ian Hendrie 28 Jan 12 - 03:23 PM
ChrisJBrady 29 Jan 12 - 05:19 PM
ChrisJBrady 07 Feb 12 - 07:00 PM
Ian Hendrie 08 Feb 12 - 07:38 AM
ChrisJBrady 08 Feb 12 - 09:56 AM
ChrisJBrady 09 Feb 12 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,CJB 11 Feb 12 - 11:15 AM
GUEST 11 Feb 12 - 11:41 AM
GUEST,CJB 11 Feb 12 - 11:59 AM
GUEST,SqueezeMe 17 Feb 12 - 10:04 PM
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Subject: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 01:08 PM

Please does anyone have recordings of the Radio Ballads from 2006/7 (I do have 'Song of Steel').

Also I'm trying to get a recording of "Charles Parker and the Radio Ballads" programme from BBC Radio 7 / Extra August 2011.

And in the original series of Radio Ballads in the 1950/60s Charles Parker produced two without MacColl and Seeger et al. These were titled "The Jewelry" and "A Cry from the Cut." Were these ever broadcast &/or are they available any where?

Many thanks.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 01:12 PM

These are the 2006/7 programmes:

The Song of Steel
Mon 25 Dec 11pm
Decline of Sheffield & Rotherham's steel industries.

Enemy That Lives Within
Tue 26 Dec 9pm
Modern stories of people living with HIV/AIDS.

Horn of the Hunter
Sun 24 Dec 9pm
Both sides of the story of hunting with hounds.

Swings and Roundabouts
Not currently scheduled
The travelling people who run Britain's fairgrounds.

Thirty Years of Conflict
Wed 27 Dec 9pm
Sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland.

Ballad of the Big Ships
Thu 28 Dec 9pm
Shipyards of Tyne & Wear and Clyde.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 01:23 PM

OK - great - I've found the 2006 versions on Amazon. Purchases in hand.

However the 'Jewelry' and 'Cut' originals I am still seeking. And also the prog. about Charles Parker.

Cheers.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 02:43 PM

Charles Parker the Radio Ballads

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00l3pvz

Original Radio Ballads - the two missing progs

http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/radio2/radioballads/original/orig_history.shtml/ext/_auto/-/http://www.mustrad.org.uk/enth13.htm


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GUEST,Ian Hendrie
Date: 23 Jan 12 - 07:23 PM

"It's a Hard Life for a Girl on the Cut" was written, apparently for the "A Cry from the Cut" programme. The words can be found here : http://www.waterwaysongs.co.uk/hard_life.htm

I note that, on that web-page, David Blagrove is reported as having a different opinion about the origin. In some of the sleeve notes written by Mr Blagrove to a couple of lp's there is ambiguity about the origins of some canal songs. Perhaps he had reasons for suggesting that some songs which appeared in the 60's had traditional boating origins. It would be useful to know the truth.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 08:00 AM

Sorry the URL got mangled:

http://www.mustrad.org.uk/enth13.htm

AND there is a great version of the 'Cut' here:

http://vimeo.com/17437484

Also it seems that the original BBC Radio Ballads inspired others to create their own:

The Lost Days of Steam

http://www.themusicwellhome.co.uk/programme.aspx?path=LostDaysOfSteam

Welcome to 'The Lost Days of Steam', a documentary inspired originally by the 40th anniversary of the end of regular steam operation on British Railways. It serves as an aural record of music, poetry and recollections of railway workers and enthusiasts alike and offers a balanced view between the romantic and the realistic standpoint held by those who cared for what now seems a lost way of life.

And then there is something more local:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SOUTHEND-RADIO-BALLADS-songs-stories-and-memories-seaside-town-BBC-recd-/280811722140

Are there any other similar Radio Ballad programmes?


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 08:32 AM

CJB - have PMd you:
Similar progs:
Romeo and Juliet (1966) - set in East London, produced by Charles and featuring members of The Critics Group.
"Sweet Lives And Lawless Billows." Produced by Philip Donellan - 4 programmes for schools on Sam Larner - can't remember if they follow RB form.
"The Blind Set" Not included in Topic's Radio Ballad re-issues, but always counted as one.
The hugh 'Long March of Everyman' series in which Charles was involved , employed some of the RB techniques.
You are aware, of course, that a number of the original RB were re-made as films, by Philip Donellan.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Ian Hendrie
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 09:19 AM

The Michael Askin Vimeo video of 'Cry from the Cut' linked to from the previous post puzzles me. There doesn't appear to be any music - so what was Ian Campbell's involvement as referred to in his 1999 letter to The Guardian?

Is this a different recording which has acquired the same name?


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 10:28 AM

The original had music performed by members of the Ian Campbell Group, as did 'The Jewelry'
Jim Carroll
PS My earlier post should read huge Long March.... - not to be confused with '.... Of Lincoln'
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 11:57 AM

Jim thank you for the PM. Your very kind offer raises some interesting possibilities and hence my delay in replying. Sorry about that. I have PM'd you in return.

====

The latest Radio Ballads seem to be:

The Ballad of the Miner's Strike

In specially commissioned songs to mark the 25th anniversary of the end of miners' strike, Radio 2 explores how lives were changed by the year-long dispute (1984-85). Date: Tue 02/Mar/10 22:30

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00r33b2

The Ballad of the Olympics

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/mediapacks/olympiad/other/ballads.html

But I can't find a list of the programmes.

Sadly the film versions of the original Radio Ballads do not seem to be available anywhere.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 12:00 PM

Sorry clickies here:

Miner's Strike

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00r33b2

Olympics

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/mediapacks/olympiad/other/ballads.html


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 03:30 AM

congratulations on all your research, CJB


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 10:24 AM

The role of communism in the radio ballads-

Discuss!

Thanks


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 04:29 PM

Here's another set of Beeb progs on Canals.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/stoke/content/articles/2008/02/05/radio_stoke_on_the_cut_feature.shtml

Part 1 (Homes & Boats)
Canals 2 (Narrow Boats & Broad Boats)
Canals series, Part 3 (Carrying Cargoes)
Canals series, Part 4 (Horses & Motors)
Canals, Part 5 (Boats On The Move)
Canals series, Part 6 (Forging Ahead)
Canals series, Part 7 (A Tough Life)
Canals series, Part 8 (On The Bank)
Canals series, Part 9 (Growing Up)
Canals series, Part 10 (End of An Era)

The audio RM files can be downloaded using Orbit and the following URLs:

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_1.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_2.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_3.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_4.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_5.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_6.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_7.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_8.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_9.rm
rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/stoke/2008/03/on_the_cut_10.rm

Enjoy - CJB


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 04:43 PM

Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: *#1 PEASANT* - PM
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 10:24 AM

The role of communism in the radio ballads-
Discuss!
Thanks

=====

You need to go here and listen to the Ewan MacCol & Peggy Seeger Concert in Sydney:

http://www.warrenfahey.com/songs-of-struggle.html

=====


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Mark Dowding
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 03:01 AM

Thanks for mentioning the Lost Days of Steam Chris. Chris Pollington and I had fun making that and we've got hours of interviews with people most of which we couldn't put in the programme because of time restrictions. We had one fireman giving us chapter and verse on how to get a steam loco going and keep it running. Dave Goulder gave us some great stuff and the rest of the interviewees were coming up with loads of interesting stories.

There's another programme in the music well archive about Harry Boardman that we did if you're interested. Interviews with Mike Harding, Bill Leader, Bernard Wrigley, The Oldham Tinkers and other people who knew him.

Cheers
Mark


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 04:38 AM

"The role of communism in the radio ballads-"
MacColl, Seeger and Parker were all Marxists, though as far as I am aware, not connected to any particular political party at the time.
From his early days MacColl was convinced that our folk songs (proper) were the creative expression of working people and he constantly spoke of their creativity and the "poetry of working class speech", particularly in relation to the Child ballads "the high-watermark of our tradition".
The first radio ballad, 'John Axon', was originally intended to be performed by studio actors from a script made up of recorded actuality gathered by MacColl Seeger and Parker, from railway men who had worked with Axon - a tribute to his bravery, for which he received The George Cross. When they examined the recorded material, MacColl suggested that it was too important to be given to actors, who, he believed, were not equipped to handle the vernacular, and that it could be edited into what turned out to be the first example of major access by working people to the public media.
The role of Communism in The Radio Ballads? Recognising and presenting the poetics of working class speech in a creative form to the public at large for the first time, via British radio - no more, no less.
Discuss!
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 12:41 PM

Yes- it is not all bad some great contributions but any time one political belief dominates almost all research and presentation- can that ever be good? it wont be good in the market place where the imbalance lost those who had moved on in their thinking.....

Folk song is the creative expression of all people, anytime anywhere
It is not as if you cant sing and compose or adapt the music if you are not a worker- I guess that means that Maccoll did not write folk songs.....as in most of his career he was not a worker....as defined generally

I think grants should be given to non-comunist, marxist, socialists to help with the imbalance.

Conrad


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 01:54 PM

" but any time one political belief dominates almost all research and presentation- can that ever be good?"
Does it really, can you give an example of where this happens?
MacColl regarded folk music as 'the music of the people' - the voice of the voiceless- was this wrong? I have on our shelf a series of Topic albums entitled 'Voice of the People', were they deliberately misnamed for political reasons?
MacColl's political views were what they were and he wrote songs to express them, as has every songmaker writing on contemporary political and social themes throughout history has done before him.
Some of the earliest songs ever published are to be found in Thomas Wright's 'Political Songs of England' From the Reign of John to Edward II 1199 to 1327, published in 1839 - half in Latin, half in old English - a bit late to complain about political songs, don't you think?
It's always been my experience that those who complain about the mixing of folk song and politics are usually griping that the political views being expressed do not coincide with their own.
In all my time involved with MacColl's Singers Club (20 odd years) I never once saw a singer asked not to sing songs that might offend the club regulars or organisers, but I was often told at other clubs, "we don't allow political/contemporary/accompanied/that sort of song here. I know members of The Critics Group were regularly offered bookings on the understanding that they didn't sing certain songs that were part of their established repertoirs - makes you think, or maybe not, as the case may be.
By the way; MacColl never claimed to "write folk songs" he always drew a distinction between his own songs and those that had come down through the tradition - though he was often quite chuffed to hear songs like Dirty Old Town and Shoals of Herring mistaken for folk songs.
Neither of his clubs, 'The Ballads and Blues' or 'The Singers Club' ever included the word 'folk' in their title, though they both featured folk songs and songs made in the folk style throughout their existance.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 03:54 PM

I would suggest that figures such as MacColl and Lloyd believed that the working man was the only form of human being able to compose and sing folk song properly purely wrong.

No I hold a variety of political views- depends on the topic-this is not what I find in folk music which is for the most part one sided

but I wonder how he would have reacted to someone coming in and daring to sing an anti communist song- did he ever record any-publish any? What about pro war songs.....there must have been some or at least some people interested in that point of view my feeling is that they were mostly scared off by the redness of it all.

I have no problem with communists and socialists however why is it all we seem to have? When a tradition that claims to invite all is so one sided there is something not right.

Conrad


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 03:20 AM

Sorry Conrad - I find your argument somewhat bizzarre - to say the least.
I have no intention of entering into the 'what is a folk song' argument - neither the time and the place.
By deninition - nothing to do with MacColl or Lloyd - the folk songs we came to when we became involved in the revival, were the songs of the agricultural working people, soldiers, sailors, fishermen, miners, gypsies and tinkers.... that remains the definition for me, for virtually all academics and reseachers, and for those who would describe themselves as 'traditionalists.
If the term 'folk' has been re-defined, then it is entirely up to those who are familiar with that re-definition to tell us what it is so we can, at the very least, take it into consideration - please feel free.
Finis.
As for believing that the working man is the one form of human being who is able to "sing folk song properly" - who on earth has ever suggested that?
Neither MacColl nor Lloyd were what you would describe as 'working men' - - are you seriously suggesting that they went around declaring themselves unable to "sing folk songs"? Please don't be silly.
As for MacColl singing anti- communist songs - why should he have done - he was a communist. Are you insisting that he should sing songs he didn't belive in - isn't that a little 'folk police-ish'?
I really think you do have a problem with communists and socialists -you appear to be finding them under the bed, in the wardrobe, in the flower beds.... wherever you look.
Where is this great left-wing plot you seem to have uncovered - are you claiming that the radio Ballads were part of that plot?
You are obviously 'of the right' - why don't you put a Radio Ballad together and see what you come up with (or is the media a part of this left-wing plot as well)?
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Ian Hendrie
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 05:57 AM

Can we get back on thread?

I, for one, would be very interested in finding and preserving for posterity the 'Cry from the Cut' missing Radio Ballad which Ian Campbell was involved in.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 06:42 AM

"finding and preserving for posterity "
Whoops - sorry, was brought up to respond to questions.
Fear not - both 'Cry From the Cut' and 'The Jewelry' are deposited in The Charles Perker Archive in Birmingham Central Library - there is probably a copy at The National Sound Archive at the British Library, if not, I'm sure they would have no problem acquiring one.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Ian Hendrie
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 06:45 AM

Thanks for that information Jim. I was under the impression they had been 'lost'.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 08:04 AM

Not as far as I know Ian.
I worked at The Charles Parker archive for around 4 weeks in total about ten years ago; both the programmes were there then on reel-to-reel tapes.
I understand that some of the material has been digitised since, though I don't know if it has ever been made available - it should be - Charles did some wonderful work.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 01:54 PM

Back to the original thread...

Here's a wonderful article on how and why the 'Jewelry' and 'Cut' Ballads were written, and the technical issues that challenged those involved:

THE BIRMINGHAM BALLADS

Part 1 - Brian Vaughton, writer and compiler

Brian Vaughton compiled and wrote two radio programmes in 1961 and 1962. Both were produced by Charles Parker from the BBC Birmingham studios. One of the performers, Rosemary Redpath, later described these programmes as "The Birmingham Ballads" and that is how we shall call "The Jewellery" and "Cry from the Cut" in this series of articles.

The first part of our survey of The Birmingham Ballads deals with Brian Vaughton himself. His activities in radio and television from the late 1950s till well into the twenty-first century are worthy of note in any case. In the following paragraphs he describes his life and the background to his involvement in documentary features. The words here are Brian's with only a few corrections and adjustments for the sake of clarity.

http://www.cpatrust.org.uk/Bham_ballads.htm

AND see this:

The Charles Parker Day 2012
University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London, W1B 2UW
Friday 30th March 2012 10.30-16.45

http://www.cpatrust.org.uk/days.html


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Ian Hendrie
Date: 28 Jan 12 - 03:23 PM

You've uncovered plenty of amazing material there Chris - well done!


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 29 Jan 12 - 05:19 PM

More Radio Ballads or musical documentaries. It just occurred to me that the Radio Ballads could have influenced Charles Chilton or maybe v.v. with regards to his similar programmes. These have really been forgotten, they were not referenced on his Wiki entry, and as far as I know I am the only one to have had copies. They were actually recorded in the 1970s from the New Zealand National Programme played from transcription discs. It is thought that the original programmes date from the late 1950/60s. They are available at:

Musical Portrait of London
http://www.mediafire.com/?5puqedg9m9nevx6

Botany Bay and the Founding of New South Whales
http://www.mediafire.com/?gfyomrquqx0t3to

Oh - What a Lovely War!
http://www.mediafire.com/?6a9b4t74lib5wsy

The Victory & The Battle of Trafalgar
http://www.mediafire.com/?ry32wfbpsrs282p


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 07 Feb 12 - 07:00 PM

Yet more information - an amazing book:

Set Into Song

Ewan MacColl, Charles Parker, Peggy Seeger and the Radio Ballads

Take a communist playwright, actor, singer and songwriter and introduce him to a young American musician and singer half his age. They fall in love. Add an ex-submarine commander with an eccentric view of radio as Art. Send them with the new mobile tape recorder to railway yards, onto fishing vessels, down coal mines, in search of gypsy encampments.

http://www.setintosong.co.uk

And the texts of the original ballads are here:

http://www.setintosong.co.uk/index.pl?page=5;


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: Ian Hendrie
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 07:38 AM

A link to Peter Cox (author of Set Into Song) talking about the Radio Ballads was recently given on another Mudcat thread which 'sank' rather quickly and may have been missed is repeated here.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 08 Feb 12 - 09:56 AM

Thank you for that reminder. The Peter Cox audio at Archive.org can be downloaded too!!

Since the original ballads as later issued by Topic for a series of LPs are now (reportedly) out of licence I wonder if its worth uploading them to Archive.org

Meanwhile the Beeb is apparently doing six Radio ballads for the Olympics. But I cannot find any further info. about these.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 09 Feb 12 - 09:43 AM

I have been researching the original ballads and am surprised that some of them never saw the light of day after the first broadcast. Of particular concern is 'The Body Blow.'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/radioballads/original/bodyblow.shtml

Quote: "This was originally conceived as an exploration of the psychology of pain, but the project eventually focused on the subject of poliomyelitis, a disease prevalent at the time. Inspired partly by the montage sequences in Alain Resnais' film, Last Year in Marienbad, the programme is a journey into the minds of five polio sufferers, two partially and three totally disabled."

Quote: "This was the fifth in the series, broadcast in March 1962 and made with a considerably smaller budget and on a much shorter timescale than the previous radio ballads. Fieldwork was kept to a minimum and the interviews conducted in a single hospital in the course of a fortnight. Stylistically, the programme marked a departure from its predecessors, abandoning the fades and cross-fades technique in favour of montage blocks lending the narrative, according to MacColl, "the quality of the stream-of-consciousness passages in James Joyce's Ulysses". Taking just two weeks, Peggy Seeger scored the songs for just two voices and four instrumentalists and the programme was completed in four days in the studio."

Quote: "The lyrics dealt with difficult topics: rehabilitation after chronic illness, adjustment to paralysis, the process of physical therapy. The subject matter caused criticism and scepticism pre-transmission but it was subsequently hailed by the critics as a tour de force. The Body Blow was never released as an LP, but tapes of the programme were later used in hospitals and health care centres for training purposes."

One later comment on the website opined:

"I spent three months last year running UNICEF's media operation in the campaign to eradicate polio here. We've had an outbreak after being polio-free for 10 years and I have seen many lives blighted needlessly. This programme was beautifully crafted and moving. I've sent it to my colleagues still working on the campaign."

====

So my question is - "why has the BBC neglected this particular Radio Ballad - if it contains so much valuable and inspirational material that medical professionals are swopping tapes of the orginal broadcast around the world?"

====


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GUEST,CJB
Date: 11 Feb 12 - 11:15 AM

Some of the Original Radio Ballads can still be heard and downloaded from the BBC server(s):

Paste these links into Real Player:

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/johnaxon.rm

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/singingthefishing.rm

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/songofaroad.rm

Whilst they play you can capture the sound using Audacity and Stereo Mix (XP has SM configured, for Win 7 you'll have to do this - Google search "configuring stereo mix windows 7"). Then you csn do a Save As ... MP3 (192 kbps is recommended).

Or you can simply download them by using Right-mouse-click / Save As ...

Or use Orbit which will download them, and which is restartable if the connection fails.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Feb 12 - 11:41 AM

More links:

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/fightgame.rm

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/bighewer.rm

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/bodyblow.rm

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/travellingpeople.rm


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GUEST,CJB
Date: 11 Feb 12 - 11:59 AM

Another link:

rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/radioballads/ontheedge.rm


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GUEST,SqueezeMe
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 10:04 PM

Only slightly off topic, but surprised no mention has been made in this thread of "Sound the Jubilee", a Radio Ballad style "folkumentary" produced to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery. Featuring members of The New Scorpion Band.
BBC broadcast 18th March 2007.

(Admin; sorry, unable to sign in...)


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: ChrisJBrady
Date: 30 Mar 12 - 12:33 PM

"Only slightly off topic, but surprised no mention has been made in this thread of "Sound the Jubilee", a Radio Ballad style "folkumentary" produced to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery. Featuring members of The New Scorpion Band.
BBC broadcast 18th March 2007."

More details from:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/shropshire/content/articles/2007/03/17/abolition_sound_the_jubilee_feature.shtml

It can be listened to at the same page (look for small speaker icon).



Does anyone have a recording of this important programme? It has gone from iPlayer.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: SqueezeMe
Date: 24 Apr 12 - 07:37 AM

CJB, pm me with a postal address if you like; you might get lucky!
MC


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio Ballads 2006/7
From: GMGough
Date: 24 Apr 12 - 09:54 AM

The link above to "abolition sound the jubilee" from the Radio Shropshire page seems to be working today.

I listened to
http://www.bbc.co.uk/shropshire/realmedia/2007/03/sound_the_jubilee.ram

However it is a link requiring Real Player. I used Media Player Classic which is free from http://media-player-classic.software.informer.com/

(I have no reason to think there is any malware in this program but I suppose I had better say caveat emptor.)


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