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Origins: Hey Ho, Nobody Home

DigiTrad:
SOULING SONG


Related threads:
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Heigh ho nobody home--history? (12)
(origins) Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft? (6)
BS: What is Soulcake (32)
Looking for souling/soulcake memories! (4)
Lyr Req: A Soalin' (Peter, Paul & Mary) (54)
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SOULCAKE VERSE (6)


Peter T. 12 Oct 99 - 02:53 PM
Vixen 12 Oct 99 - 03:03 PM
Peter T. 12 Oct 99 - 03:10 PM
sophocleese 12 Oct 99 - 03:30 PM
Vixen 12 Oct 99 - 03:33 PM
Mían 12 Oct 99 - 05:11 PM
Peter T. 12 Oct 99 - 05:35 PM
Malcolm Douglas 12 Oct 99 - 10:12 PM
Peter T. 13 Oct 99 - 09:21 AM
Allan C. 13 Oct 99 - 09:56 AM
polesden 13 Oct 99 - 11:30 AM
Mían 13 Oct 99 - 11:45 AM
Roger the skiffler 13 Oct 99 - 11:47 AM
sophocleese 13 Oct 99 - 01:09 PM
TimS 13 Oct 99 - 01:24 PM
selby 13 Oct 99 - 01:32 PM
nicole the wonder nerd 14 Oct 99 - 12:16 AM
Wolfgang 14 Oct 99 - 03:47 AM
Lesley N. 14 Oct 99 - 07:13 AM
Andy 14 Oct 99 - 08:54 AM
Peter T. 14 Oct 99 - 09:48 AM
MMario 14 Oct 99 - 10:43 AM
Wolfgang 15 Oct 99 - 06:22 AM
Malcolm Douglas 17 Oct 99 - 03:17 PM
Ed Pellow 17 Oct 99 - 05:01 PM
wildlone 17 Oct 99 - 05:32 PM
bet 17 Oct 99 - 07:45 PM
Malcolm Douglas 17 Oct 99 - 09:21 PM
Peter T. 18 Oct 99 - 12:17 PM
Ed Pellow 18 Oct 99 - 04:06 PM
Peter T. 18 Oct 99 - 05:08 PM
Michelle 19 Oct 99 - 04:14 PM
Blackcat 19 Oct 99 - 04:24 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Oct 99 - 07:43 PM
Cricket in Canyon Lake, TX 20 Oct 99 - 12:04 AM
Blackcat 20 Oct 99 - 09:33 AM
Penny S. 07 Nov 99 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,Azure 16 May 03 - 02:29 AM
masato sakurai 16 May 03 - 05:07 AM
The O'Meara 16 May 03 - 11:26 AM
Jack Campin 29 Jan 09 - 06:03 PM
GUEST 29 Jan 09 - 11:13 PM
Joe Offer 30 Jan 09 - 01:09 AM
GUEST 30 Jan 09 - 06:13 AM
GUEST,Maggie 18 Mar 09 - 08:52 PM
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Subject: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 02:53 PM

Does anybody know anything about this round, which appears in Rise Up Singing (and if anyone has better chords than that version, I would appreciate it, since they don't fit my memory of the song)? I know that Peter, Paul, and Mary sang it. Is there a history behind this song, and are there more than the traditional 4 lines:
"Hey, ho, nobody home, eat nor drink nor money have I none, yet will I be merry, hey, ho, etc." I can't find anything in the DT.
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Vixen
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 03:03 PM

It's in the PPM songbook as A Soalin' and I think it's an old traditional song.

Soul a soul a soul cake
Please good missus a soul cake
Apple plum pear cherry
Any good thing to make us all merry
One for Peter two for Paul
One for him who made us all

Bless the master of this house
and the mistress also
and all the little children
That round your table grow

... If you haven't got a penny
a ha'penny will do
If you haven't got a ha'penny
then god bless you...

etc

V


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 03:10 PM

Vixen -- (boy are you fast, the Joe Offer prize awaits) -- are these extra verses around the chorus, a different set of words, or what? yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 03:30 PM

My copy of it is from the Chester Book of Madrigals. There it is collected from Thomas Ravenscrofts, Pammelia, 1609 edition. It was collected by him not necessarily composed by him. It doesn't list any other words for it.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Vixen
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 03:33 PM

Peter--

Those are just the words I remember from my copy. I provided them so you could be sure we were talking about the same song. Since I play the git-box part, and don't sing, I'm not sure of all the words or their order. I'll look them up tonight and post 'em tomorrow, along with any publications information I have. I'll send along the chords too, since I play a lead part and don't know them either. Guess you'd better hold the Joe Offer award--he's fast, but he's also VERY accurate...

V


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Mían
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 05:11 PM

Here are a couple of sites on the subject:

here's one

Here's another

And yet another


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Subject: Lyr Add: A SOALIN' (Stookey/Batteaste/Mezzetti)
From: Peter T.
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 05:35 PM

Thanks for the work, Mian, Vixen, sophocleese. This is from the PPM site, and I assume has been added to:
(Still like the chords, though!!!)

From: www.downeast.net/ppm/nmoving.h:

A SOALIN'
(Stookey/Batteaste/Mezzetti) Pepamar Music Inc. ASCAP

Hey ho, nobody home, meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry, Hey ho, nobody home.
Hey ho, nobody home, Meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry, Hey ho, nobody home.
Hey Ho, nobody home.

 Soal, a soal, a soal cake, please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry, any good thing to make us all merry,
One for Peter, two for Paul, three for Him who made us all.

God bless the master of this house, and the mistress also
And all the little children that round your table grow.
The cattle in your stable and the dog by your front door
And all that dwell within your gates we wish you ten times more.

 Soal, a soal, a soal cake, please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry, any good thing to make us all merry,
One for Peter, two for Paul, three for Him who made us all.

Go down into the cellar and see what you can find
If the barrels are not empty we hope you will be kind
We hope you will be kind with your apple and strawber'
For we'll come no more a 'soalin' till this time next year.

 Soal, a soal, a soal cake, please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry, any good thing to make us all merry,
One for Peter, two for Paul, three for Him who made us all.

The streets are very dirty, my shoes are very thin.
I have a little pocket to put a penny in.
If you haven't got a penny, a ha' penny will do.
If you haven't got a ha' penny then God bless you.

 Soal, a soal, a soal cake, please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry, any good thing to make us all merry,
One for Peter, two for Paul, three for Him who made us all.

Now to the Lord sing praises all you within this place,
And with true love and brotherhood each other now embrace..
This holy tide of Christmas of beauty and of grace,
Oh tidings of comfort and joy.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 12 Oct 99 - 10:12 PM

Though the melodies of Ravenscroft's round and the Souling song have much in common, it seems very unlikely that the two songs are related; it's much safer to assume -unless anyone out there has information to the contrary- that Stookey/Batteaste/Mezzetti (whoever they are) simply noticed the similarity and combined the Cheshire Souling song with the round, together with whatever else popped into their heads at the time. It reads to me like a mutant hybrid of Souling and Wassailing ("Tidings of Comfort and Joy"?! Carols as well?) The tune turns up all over the place, at its simplest as one of the most common tunes for children's playground games. The opening phrases and basic structure can also be heard in such diverse pieces as "Butternut Hill" and Oskar Merikanto's "Vallinkorvan Laulu". The underlying melody may be extremely old, but that certainly doesn't mean that all the texts that have been sung to it and its many variants have any particular connection with each other.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 09:21 AM

Stookey is Peter, Paul, or Mary. (I think Paul, who had to change his name from Neil to get into the group -- why I remember that, and not which one is Stookey is typical). I am now getting totally confused. Could one of you experts tell me how the original round goes -- is it just the four lines and nothing more?
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Allan C.
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 09:56 AM

Soul Cakes and Souling Song are both in the database. The MIDI is not currently available for the former but the one for the latter one is worth a listen. It is a little different from what I am accustomed to hearing.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: polesden
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 11:30 AM

The version that my choir sings is
Hey Ho is there anybody home
Food and drink and money have we none
Yet we will be ha-a-a-py
Hey Ho, anybody home.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Mían
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 11:45 AM

What I learned when young was

Hey, Ho
Nobody Home
Meat Nor Drink Nor Money Have I None
Yet
Will I
be Merry!


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Roger the skiffler
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 11:47 AM

The simple version polesden quotes is the one I remember from my days with the Girl Guides (before I had the operation).*BG* RtS


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: sophocleese
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 01:09 PM

The one I know is;

Hey Ho, Nobody Home, Meat nor drink nor money have I none, Fill the pot Edie!

Its from my madrigalian days.

Sophocleese


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: TimS
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 01:24 PM

Stookey is overwhelmingly likely to be Noel "Paul" Stookey of Peter, Paul and Mary. That's "Noel", not "Neil". I'm quite sure of that, though I can't quote you chapter and verse. I know I've heard him referred to as "Noel Paul Stookey" many times, while "Neil" doesn't resonate at all.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: selby
Date: 13 Oct 99 - 01:32 PM

I sang the song many many years (1962 -64) ago as a scout I was told that the words were HEY HO ANYBODY HOME MEAT AND DRINK AND MONEY HAVE I NONE YET I WILL BE HAAAPPY HEY HO ANY BODY HOME.We were told it was an old Canadian mountie song that they sang whilst paddling canoes. The idea was to start softly through loud & back to soft. So the audience thought they were stood on a bank watching as we went by. Keith


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: nicole the wonder nerd
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 12:16 AM

Hi 'vrybody, I'm just stopping by... :) My high school chums and I learned it as:

Hey, ho, nobody home Meat nor drink nor money have I none Yet will I be merry

Rose, Rose, Rose, Rose Will I ever see thee wed? I will marry at thy will, sire, At thy will.

Ding, dong, ding, dong Wedding bells on an April morn Carve your name on a moss-covered stone On a moss-covered stone.

Mother, father, dig my grave Dig it with a silver spade On it place a turtledove To show that I died for love.

Hey, ho, nobody home Meat nor drink nor money have I none Yet will I be merry Hey, ho, hum. (repeat until everyone catches up)

I dance English country dance at Ren Faires, and in my experience plenty of people know the "Hey, ho..." and "Rose Rose..." verses, some know the "Ding, dong..." verse, and the "Mother, father..." verse is apparently peculiar to my group of friends. "Rise Up Singing" lists "Hey, ho, nobody home" and "Rose, Rose" as separate songs, but we've always sung them as one. And--try as I might--I can't fit the "soal cake" verses listed above to the tune I know, and most of the other verses given seem to fit more to the tune of "Here We Come A-Wassailing" rather than "Hey Ho". Help?

--nicole twn


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Wolfgang
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 03:47 AM

click here
for some (of many) German lyrics to that round.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Lesley N.
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 07:13 AM

The "soul cakes" caught my interest and I thought others might be interested in what they refer to (sorry, it's the historian in me). I learned this from John Davis who sent me information about John Barleycorn. It's from Frazier's The golden bough. King a gruesome - but Halloween is coming up....

The Corn King was selected from the men of the tribe, treated as a king for a year, then at a pre-set time, danced the corn maze and was killed. His body was then dragged through the fields so the blood would run in the furrows and make the barley grow. Afterwards, he himself may have been eaten.

The barley was made into cakes and stored for the winter. Around the solstice, when it was evident the sun would come back for another year, the cakes were given to children to imbue them with the spirit of the corn king. They were called 'soal cakes' (soul cakes), and in England, kids still go a-soalin' for cookies.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Andy
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 08:54 AM

Lovely discussion,

I remeber the song here in UK and it is from days when I helped with the girls guides - Yes and me a man - so I claim - Did the Scouts too but they never sung it !

Hey ho nobody Home Meat and drink and Money have I none Yet I will go merrily along

Hi ho Hi Ho

Then off again - goregeous round - We were led to believe it was canadian and that was all !

Very romantic sound and tune usually in the lower contralto registers.

I think this discussion comes close to the other thread on making folk music more interesting and the verbal tradition and changes which it engenders.

Nice one - I'd like to read more if there is any.

a XX


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 09:48 AM

Nice discussion, but we aren't getting much clarification here!! (I think we may have entered folk source hell)
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: MMario
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 10:43 AM

I learned all the "verses" from Nicole's post as seperate rounds, but they DO all fit the tune for "Hey ho" (and several others as well)

PP&M do their souling song to a tune that is almost the same as hey-ho....try singing the rest to Hey-ho...they do fit with a bit of warping of the phrasing. the verses of their adaptation do seem to come from several traditional songs, and they do it in a round-ish fashion


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Wolfgang
Date: 15 Oct 99 - 06:22 AM

A couple of posts above I have linked you to German versions of that round. I was interested which version came first. Here's the result of my digging:
This round has been trad. in Germany before the last century, nevertheless its origin is stated as being "English" (leaving open whether language or part of a big island is meant) in my oldest source.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 17 Oct 99 - 03:17 PM

It looks like the Peter Paul & Mary "Soulin' Song" breaks up as follows:

"Hey ho...etc" -Ravenscroft's round.

"Soul, a soul...God bless the master...The streets...etc" -these parts seem to be from the Cheshire version recorded by the Watersons, which is on the database. The tune they used was described by A.L. Lloyd as "(a) little trichordal tune based simply on a scale of three adjacent notes within a minor third...one of the most primitive we have." As is often the way with very old customs, soul-caking became something that children did long after the adults had given it up.

"Go down into the cellar..." -this may be from the other group of Souling songs, which are sung to at least two different tunes, and generally include "calling on" verses introducing the characters of the accompanying mumming play. That's the tradition that the "grown-ups" kept up, at least into the 1950s. Alternatively it may come from a wassail song; it has a pretty generic flavour.

"Now to the Lord..." -this really doesn't belong at all, as Souling is specifically an All Souls custom. They probably got it from the well-known carol.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Ed Pellow
Date: 17 Oct 99 - 05:01 PM

I'd agree with Malcolm that the 'Hey ho' round seems to have at some time become mixed up with the Souling Song. (that's folk for you)

However, the woman I first heard the song from remembers singing it in the Girl Guides in the eary '50s so it would appear doubtful that Peter, Paul and Mary combined them.

Malcolm also mentions that the "Go down into the cellar" verse may come from the 'other' group of souling songs. In Roy Palmer's 'Everyman's book of English Country Songs' there is a version from 1886 which includes this verse along with the Watersons verses.

I'd agree though that the Christmas verse does seem completely out of place.

Malcolm - I'd be interested to know what you mean by the other souling song group. I'd always assumed they were variants of the same one? Thanks.

As far as the meaning of the song is concerned, for those interested:

"The end of October and start of November is the time of Hallowe'en, All Saints and All Souls, a time once thought full of magic, when the dead temorarily returned to the world of the living and roamed around the villages on the misty evenings. Till recently in parts of the Midlands and the Northwest, children went from door to door begging for soulcakes, representing as these did, food for the momentarily-returning dead, so that they would not feel rejected and thus be made angry"

A.L.Lloyd's notes from The Watersons: Frost and Fire album.

Finally. Peter, the chords I play are:

For the round and the verse:

[Em] Hey [D] ho, [Em] Nobody home
Meat nor [D] drink nor [Em] money have we none
Yet [D] we'll be [Em] merry
[Em] Hey [D] ho, [Em] Nobody home

And for the chorus pretty much the same except that it goes to G on:

[Em]An apple[D] a pear [G] a plum or a [D] cherry

Hope this helps

Ed

What an excellent thread...


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: wildlone
Date: 17 Oct 99 - 05:32 PM

My Mother says she used to sing the Souling song around the city of Chester on the 1st of november which was also a teachers rest.
On the 1st of may children would dress up,one girl would be made queen of the may and they sang at neighbours doors.
May day may day,
Brightly shining,Through the midst of april showers,
Sorry that is all she can remember.but it was over 60 years ago.
as Ed said an excellent thread. wl


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: bet
Date: 17 Oct 99 - 07:45 PM

Hey selby, I learned that song as a scout also bu instead of canoes be were told it was hikers along way off then getting closer and finally passing on by. Interesting how things chnge. bet


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 17 Oct 99 - 09:21 PM

I'm making a distinction between the "soul-cake" branch of the Souling tradition, which was quite widespread in the past but which now survives (if at all) as a children's activity like "trick or treat", and the branch that involved -or came to involve- a mumming play and, in north-western Cheshire, the Wild Horse. It may be a misleading distinction, of course, as the songs certainly overlap in content. (As in the Watersons' recording, which mentions soulcakes, and the version in Roy Palmer's book, which doesn't.) The actual "soulcakes" mostly disappeared long ago, being replaced by gifts of food or drink or, more recently, money (probably for fireworks!) In the "adult" tradition (which could get quite violent, sometimes turning into pitched battles between rival groups of Soulers), home visits were largely replaced by tours of local pubs. I'm assuming -and I may be quite wrong- that the old trichord melody belongs with the children's branch, while the very different tune used for Palmer's Middlewich/Mobberley version belongs to the song/play of the adult groups. Most of these songs begin much as does Palmer's example:

"We are two or three good, hearty lads and we are all of one mind
And we are come out a-souling and we hope you will prove kind
And we hope you will prove kind with your apples and strong beer
And we'll come no more a-souling until this time next year."

Interestingly, the version of the Pace-Egging song -from Marple in Cheshire- that Palmer also prints has virtually the same opening verse, and proceeds straight into "calling-on" for the mumming play as does, for example, the Antrobus souling song. I guess the point is that traditions are portable. Mumming, and the Wild/Old Horse, too, really belong to the New Year, but turn up at other times depending on local circumstances. Souling would have been a good peg to hang them on. When I have time, I must compare the Souling songs I can find to see how much they vary (I think I have another three on one of Peter Kennedy's archive tapes). I'm certainly no expert, but you know what it's like when you get interested in something...

Malcolm

P.S. Ed; was it the entire version (as sung by PP&M) that your informant heard in the '50s?

P.P.S. I learnt "Hey Ho" in the Scouts, too. I remember the canoeing story!


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 18 Oct 99 - 12:17 PM

Thank you all, ladies, gentlemen and scholars, particularly Malcolm and Ed. Ready for the season I guess!!
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Ed Pellow
Date: 18 Oct 99 - 04:06 PM

Malcolm: The impression I got from the woman concerned was that, yes, she had sung the 'combined' version in the '50s. I'd come across the Ravenscroft 'Hey ho' and was interested to know her source for the combination.

She may of course have misunderstood my question, and memory (both her's and mine) isn't the most exact of sciences, so I can't say for certain.

Unfortunately, I'm not in contact with her so can't check.

I know nothing about Peter, Paul and Mary but were they apt to change and mesh traditional songs to suit their purposes?

I'm not saying that PPM didn't originate this combined version, but given the similarity of tune, it would seem just as likely that the two songs were fused earlier through the oral tradition. Id be very interested to know. Anyone have Peter, Paul or Mary's email? :-)

I know little about children's songs, but given the preponderance of the minor 3rd interval in children's rhymes and chants, your suggestion regarding the Waterson version makes sense.

On a different, but related, question, it facinates me how verses 'float' between these seasonal songs but don't seem to appear elsewhere in the tradition. A topic for another thread, I suppose.

Ed

PS I'll try not to get quite so annoyed at the 'trick or treat' children this year for following an imported US custom. Maybe we've just reimported it...


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Peter T.
Date: 18 Oct 99 - 05:08 PM

"Penny for the guy!"


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Michelle
Date: 19 Oct 99 - 04:14 PM

I've also heard the "voyaguers in canoes" legend about another round, similar in tune but with many more lilting note changes. I heard it first with these 1970s words grafted oonto it:

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow Don't walk behind me, I may not lead Just walk beside me and be my friend, Then we will walk together hand in hand.

In addition, here are another few verses I have come across to the basic "Hey Ho" or "Rose, rose" melody

Dear friends, dear friends Let me tell you how I feel You have given me such treasure I love you so

Love love love love Hear this now, the word is love Love thy neighbor as thy brother Love love love.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Blackcat
Date: 19 Oct 99 - 04:24 PM

greetings all

I love this song - known to me as A'Soulin'. I perform it regularly with a bit of 'diddlin' thrown in between chorus and verse. I usually intro it as a pre-Chirstian song for the Samhain/Hallows Eve New Years time, though I wish I knew the older lyrics for the chorus line - "One for Peter, two for Paul, three for Him who made us all." I could re-do it myself, but haven't gotten around to it and really wish I could find out the original (Assuming, that is, that it actually had non-Chrisitian words.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Oct 99 - 07:43 PM

Blackcat

I'm afraid it's extremely unlikely that there's anything pre-Christian about the Souling song, apart from the general belief in the temporary return of the dead at this time of year. It's perfectly possible, however, that the tune (the one used by the Watersons, that is, not the more elaborate version on the DT database, which I assume is from the Peter Paul & Mary version and which sounds to me like a hybrid of "Hey Ho" and "Soulcake" ) might be very old indeed. A.L. Lloyd wrote in "Folk Song In England":

The most primitive tunes in Europe are very tightly restricted in range -two tones within the compass of a second, three within the compass of a third. Usually, melodies of such tiny ambitus belong to folk ritual music, to lullabies, or to the self-made repertory of children."

He used the trichord "Soulcake" tune as an example. While there is no evidence that there are -or ever were- any "older" (i.e. pagan) lyrics for the "one for Peter..." line, I am reminded of a charm which a Linconshire clergyman claimed to have heard in his (mid-19th century) boyhood:

"Thrice I smites with Holy Crock
With this mell I thrice do knock
One for God, and one for Wod
And one for Lok."

Some scholars took that pretty seriously at the time, but he was so vague about it that we can't be sure it was authentic.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Cricket in Canyon Lake, TX
Date: 20 Oct 99 - 12:04 AM

To everybody with re to 'Soulin' This is my first step into the web. Truly. As an English teacher I was amazed at the information! A student asked me just last week what I knew of this song as he was aware of my interest in folk music. I came on line look- ing for words and chords to any folk songs to add to my collection and whoa, Henry! there was this reference. Thank you for all this information. Geez, and to think that I still use a little pink portable typewriter which survived Vietnam...


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Blackcat
Date: 20 Oct 99 - 09:33 AM

Hi all,

I guess the term pre-Christian in is not really what I meant - actually the song (the "Soul Cakes" part) looks back to a pre-Christian time and was written during the Christian era by someone who still held the non-Christian tradtions close to her/his heart. Thee ae, of course, many songs that have a mixture of Pagan and Christian becasue of the assimilation of indiginous religions into Christianity. I'd just like to have an alternate line because that line stands out like a beacon in the middle of the song. Guess Im write something of my own - unless someone else would like a crack at it? Pax


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Penny S.
Date: 07 Nov 99 - 06:46 AM

There are actually genuinely old Old English charms that mix Christian and pagan invocations - it wouldn't be surprising if some had lasted in the oral tradition.

Penny


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: GUEST,Azure
Date: 16 May 03 - 02:29 AM

I have heard it sung in harmony with:
"Rose, Rose Rose, Red
Will I ever see thee wed
I will marry at thy will, Sire
At thy will"

I also have an obscure reference for this that says
'Pammelia, 1609'


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: masato sakurai
Date: 16 May 03 - 05:07 AM

Links to Pammelia:

Pammelia. Mvsicks Miscellanie. (1609)

85. Hey ho no body.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: The O'Meara
Date: 16 May 03 - 11:26 AM

1.Very interesting thread. It tends to reenforce my theory that by following a thread it is possible to complicate a brick to the point where it can't be used for anything.

2. From the original "Tonight" tv show starring Steve Allen doing "The Question Man";

Answer: Peter, Paul and Mary.

Question: Name a candy bar and a virgin.





sorry.


O'Meara


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: Jack Campin
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 06:03 PM

Anybody know the Dutch words to this?

Last time I sang it was in a guesthouse in north-east Turkey, me in English and a Dutch girl doing her version. I've no idea what hers was about.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 11:13 PM

Can anyone jot down the chords to the last verse the way PP&M did it?
Lost my PP&M songbook years ago.


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Subject: ADD Chords: A'Soalin (PP&M)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 01:09 AM

There is tablature for the song at http://members.cox.net/billandleann/a-soalin.htm

The following is from the Peter Paul and Mary Song Book

A SOALIN'
(Stookey/Batteaste/Mezzetti) Pepamar Music Inc. ASCAP


F#m C#m7 F#m
Hey ho, nobody home,
          C#m7    F#m          C#m7
meat nor drink nor money have I none
F#m
Yet shall we be merry,

(repeat this pattern through the song)


F#m                                           D                A
made us all. Now to the Lord sing praises all you within this place,
    F#m                                 d            A
And with true love and brotherhood each other now embrace.
    F#m            E   C#7    F#7            E
This holy tide of Christmas of beauty and of grace,
D E A          C#          F#m
Oh tidings of comfort and joy.


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 06:13 AM

THANK YOU!!


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Subject: RE: QUERY: Hey Ho, Nobody Home
From: GUEST,Maggie
Date: 18 Mar 09 - 08:52 PM

hi ho nobody home no eat nor drink nor money have i none, still- i- will, go merrily along. Hi ho nobody home no friend nor kin have i beneath the sun, still i will sing a happy song. my spirit high my fortune low but do i cry? oh no no no! i have the sky. i have the earth between- them- have- i- so- hi ho nobody home~


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