Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Uileann pipes history article

MartinRyan 14 May 12 - 11:39 AM
mayomick 14 May 12 - 12:16 PM
GUEST,Peter Laban 14 May 12 - 12:27 PM
mayomick 14 May 12 - 12:32 PM
MartinRyan 14 May 12 - 12:38 PM
GUEST,mayomick 14 May 12 - 01:24 PM
MartinRyan 14 May 12 - 02:10 PM
mayomick 14 May 12 - 02:13 PM
Gedpipes 25 May 12 - 06:43 AM
Bobert 25 May 12 - 10:01 AM
meself 25 May 12 - 02:46 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Uileann pipes history article
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 May 12 - 11:39 AM

For an interesting article on the historical nomenclature of Irish pipes, by Nicholas Carolan, Director of the Irish Traditional Music Archive,

Click here

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: mayomick
Date: 14 May 12 - 12:16 PM

Martin,

The word uillean means elbow , but did it ever also mean "union" or "joint" in Irish ? An elbow is a joint - a union between the upper and lower parts of the arm. If another meaning of uileann is "union" there might have been some confusion between these two senses of the word .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 14 May 12 - 12:27 PM

'Uilleann' is a later invention as a name for the pipes. Most people would credit Gratton Flood with introducing this figment of his imagination. It stuck though.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: mayomick
Date: 14 May 12 - 12:32 PM

"uilean" sounds quite a lot like "union" . Perhaps the word "union" was translated as "uilean" , and the instrument took its Irish name from that , and not the fact that that the instrument is played with the elbow. It's really played with the arm rather than the elbow ,isn't it? Why didn't they call it a lamh pipe?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 May 12 - 12:38 PM

Nicholas points out, in a footnote to the first page of the article, that the term "uileann pipes" is a twentieth century invention. Grattan Flood based it, oddly enough, on a Shakespearean reference to "woollen bagpipes". The latter part of his article is concerned with a description of how "uileann" became the accepted term for Irish, bellows-blown pipes.

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: GUEST,mayomick
Date: 14 May 12 - 01:24 PM

Surely it was just a translation of the english word "union" or "joint" and the thing about it being an elbow pipe was a false etymology that arose later . Somebody asks Why do they call it a uillean pipe ? and gets told that it's because the instrument is played with the elbow . My Irish is pretty useless but a dictionary gives lots of words that translate "joint" with words that have the ull ,uil as bases. I've just spoken to my local librarian about this who has good Irish . He thinks that I may have a point .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 May 12 - 02:10 PM

mayomick

You'll just have to read the full article - it's only 118 pages long!
To my mind, there are probably TWO folk etymologies at work - one in each language. Grattan Flood's woolen/uilleann is a folk-link, really.

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: mayomick
Date: 14 May 12 - 02:13 PM

Ha ha . Thanks for posting the link btw , Martin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: Gedpipes
Date: 25 May 12 - 06:43 AM

Note 'Uilleann' not 'Uileann'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: Bobert
Date: 25 May 12 - 10:01 AM

I'll be the first to admit that all pipes look a like to me... However, stating my shortcomings I'd like to throw a name out: DeClan Masterson (sp?) who, IMHO, is one fine pipes player...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Uileann pipes history article
From: meself
Date: 25 May 12 - 02:46 PM

Thanks for putting up the link, Martin. Not being terribly interested in this particular etymology, it's taken me awhile to get to the article - but now that I've started on it, I'm enjoying it immensely. I'm not half-way through it yet .... but it's giving a fascinating picture of Irish-Scottish music in London in particular in the 17th through 19th centuries.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 20 June 4:48 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.