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Lyr Req: One morning in June as I chanced to ramb

Joe Offer 11 Jun 12 - 05:09 PM
GUEST,999 11 Jun 12 - 06:15 PM
GUEST,Fred McCormick 12 Jun 12 - 06:42 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: One morning in June as I chanced to ramb
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jun 12 - 05:09 PM

I got this request by e-mail today, and I can't find the song. Can someone help?
    Dear Joe,
    I am doing some research in relation to traditional singing among children in Ireland and it would be great if I could join the forum.

    I am also searching for the words of a song I learned years ago with the following lyrics but all searches have ended in vain- can you help?

    One morning in June as I chanced to rambling, I met a cailín a fair one was she.
    Nothing could save me I fell wild in love with her, wounded ......

    Your site is amazing.
    Le meas,
    M


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: One morning in June as I chanced to ramb
From: GUEST,999
Date: 11 Jun 12 - 06:15 PM

Here ya go,


Irish and English lyrics with some song history. Next time g'ie us something difficult.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: One morning in June as I chanced to ramb
From: GUEST,Fred McCormick
Date: 12 Jun 12 - 06:42 AM

The song appears on Topic 12T91. Joe Heaney. Irish Traditional Songs in Gaelic and English, where it is called One Morning in June. It also appears on a double CD of Joe; Ó hÉanaí, Seosamh (Joe Heaney). The Road From Connemara. Topic TSCD 518D, as Slán agus Beannacht le Buaireamh an tSaoil or Farewell to the Troubles of Life.

The text and translation of the Irish sections are below. There's also a discussion between Heaney and Ewan MacColl, who recorded Joe singing it at http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/heaney2.htm

One morning in June agus mé 'dhul ag spaisteoireacht,
Casadh liom cailín, ba ródheas a gnaoi.
She was so handsome gur thit mé i ngra léi;
D'fhága sí arraing i gceartlár mo chroí.
I asked her her name, nó cad é an ruaig bheannaithe
A chas insan áit thú, a ghrá gheal mo chroí?
My heart it will break if you don't come along with me.
Slán agus beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil.

(One morning in June and I out rambling
I met a girl, very fine was she in appearance
She was so handsome that I fell in love with her;
She left an arrow through the centre of my heart.
I asked her her name, or what blessed chance
Brought you to this place, bright love of my heart?
My heart it will break if you don't come along with me.
Farewell to the worries of life.)

"Cailín beag óg mé ó cheantar na farraige
A tógadh go cneasta mé i dtosach mo shaoil.
I being so early (airy) ó 'sé siúd ba chleachtadh liom,
That made my own parents and me disagree.
"A chuisle 's a stór, dá n-éisteofá liom tamall,
I'll tell you a story ab ait le do chroí
That I'm a young man who is totally in love with you
Surely my heart is from roguery free".

(I am a young little girl from the area by the sea
that was reared decently in the beginning of my life.
I being so early (airy) since that was what I was accustomed to,
That made my own parents and me disagree.
My love and treasure, if you would listen to me awhile
I'll tell you a story that your heart would like.
That I'm a young man who is totally in love with you
Surely my heart is from roguery free").

"Muise, go you bold rogue, sure you are wanting to flatter me,
B'fhearr éan ar an láimh na dhá éan ar an gcraoibh
I've neither wheat, potatoes or anything
Ná fiú an phluid leapa a bheadh tharrainn san oích'"
"Ceannóidh mé tae agus gléasfad in aice seo
Gúna English cotton den fhaisean atá daor
So powder your hair, love, and come away along with me
Slán agus beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil".

("Muise, go you bold rogue, sure you are wanting to flatter me,
Better a bird in the hand than two birds on the branch.
I've neither wheat, potatoes or anything
or even a bed-spread to cover us at night.
I will buy tea and I'll dress nearby here
A dress of English cotton of the expensive fashion.
So powder your hair, love, and come away along with me
Farewell to the worries of life.)

There's an ale-house nearby 's beidh muid go maidin ann,
If you're satisfied, a ghrá gheal mo chroí.
Early next morning we'll send for a clergyman
Beidh muidne ceangailte i ngan fhios dhon tsaol.
Beidh muid ag ól a fhad 's a mhairfeas an t-airgead
Then we will take the road home with all speed.
When the reckoning is paid who cares for the landlady
Slán 's beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil.

(There's an ale-house nearby and we will stay there until morning,
If you're satisfied, bright love of my heart.
Early next morning we'll send for a clergyman
And we will be united unknown to all the world.
We will drink for as long as the money lasts
Then we will take the road home with all speed.
When the reckoning is paid who cares for the landlady
Farewell to the worries of life.)

There's also a version with most of the Irish text rendered into English by Paddy Tunney, as One Morning in June. It was issued on an LP called The Flowery Vale. Topic        12TS 264. There's a text below, but you might want to be careful. It's from my own repertoire, and I doubt I sing it exactly the way Tunney did. You might also want to be careful of the tune he set it to; The Bold Thady Quill. IMHO, Joe Heaney's tune is vastly superior.

One morning in June as I chanced to go wandering,
I met a young cailín, a fair one was she.
She was so handsome nothing could save me
Wounded to death for she smiled charmingly.
I asked her her name, and what destination
Had turned her steps this way, a ghrá gheal mo chroí?
My heart it will break if you don't come along with me.
Goodbye for ever to sorrow and care.

I am a young girl from the coast far meandering.
Honestly reared though of no high degree.
But I being so airy for such was my nature
Which made my own parents and me disagree.
Says I my a stoirín will you listen to me awhile?
I'll tell you a story very pleasant to see.
That I'm a young man who is totally in love with you
Surely my heart is from roguery free.

Go you bold rogue, for you're wanting to flatter me,
A bird in the hand is worth two in the tree.
I've neither wheat, potatoes or anything
Nor a blanket to keep off cold nights that will be.
Never mind that, I'll buy silks and a dress for you,
A gown of English satin, the best in the fair.
So powder your hair, love, and come away along with me
Goodbye for ever to sorrow and care.

There's an ale-house nearby where we'll take our delight in.
If you're satisfied, love, a ghrá gheal mo chroí.
Early next morning we'll send for the clergyman
Who will bind us as tight as the bark to the tree.
We will stay drinking as long as the money lasts.
Then we will take the road and homewards we'll fare.
When the reckoning is paid who cares for the landlady
Goodbye for ever to sorrow and care.


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