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Lyr Add: Come into the Garden, Maud

Mr Happy 11 Sep 12 - 09:57 AM
GUEST,leeneia 11 Sep 12 - 10:38 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Sep 12 - 12:09 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Sep 12 - 12:38 PM
MGM·Lion 11 Sep 12 - 01:17 PM
GUEST,Blandiver 11 Sep 12 - 02:04 PM
Matthew Edwards 12 Sep 12 - 06:27 AM
MGM·Lion 12 Sep 12 - 07:28 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: Mr Happy
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 09:57 AM

Come into the garden, Maud [Michael Balfe, 1857]


Come into the garden, Maud,
For the black bat, Night, has flown;
Come into the garden, Maud,
I am here at the gate alone.
I am here at the gate alone.
And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad,
And the musk of the roses blown,
For a breeze of morning moves,
And the planet of love is on high,
Beginning to faint in the light that she loves,
On a bed of daffodil sky,
To faint in the light of the sun she loves,
To faint in his light, and to die.
Come! come!

Come into the garden, Maud,
For the black bat, Night, is flown;
Come into the garden, Maud,
I am here at the gate alone.
I am here at the gate alone.
I am here at the gate alone.
Queen Rose of the rosebud,
Garden of girls,
Come hither, the dances are done;
In gloss of satin and glimmer of pearls,
Queen, lily, and rose, in one.
Shine out little head, sunning over with curls,
To the flowers, and be their sun.
Shine out!
Shine out!

Come into the garden, Maud,
For the black bat, Night, is flown;
Come into the garden, Maud,
I am here at the gate alone.
I am here at the gate alone.
I am here at the gate alone.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-rv4YiTg8U


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 10:38 AM

Thanks, Mr. Happy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 12:09 PM

A song sheet (no date, no author named) is in American Memory, H. De Marsan, New York, (c. 1860).
The Bodleian Library has song sheets by H. P. Such and H. Disney, London.
The song seems to have been popular.

The composer is listed as Alfred Tennyson, and the arranger, M. W. Balfe.
Sheet music at Levy Sheet Music Collection.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 12:38 PM

"Maud, A Monodrama," by Tennyson, published 1855, is a very long story in rhyme. The "Come into the Garden" verse is in Part XXII, I.
http://imahh.tripod.com/mma.htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 01:17 PM

Tennyson was the original poet, not a composer. Balfe set his verse to music [as Q says, an interpolated song in a much longer dramatic poem].

The song, with its talking flowers, is parodied by Lewis Carroll in the "Garden of Live Flowers" chapter of "Through the Looking Glass". Tennyson's "She is coming, my own, my sweet; Were it ever so airy a tread", is referenced in Carroll's "She is coming ... I hear her footsteps clump clump along the gravel walk."

~M~


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come Into The Garden, Maud
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 02:04 PM

According to legend Tennyson wrote Maud at Brancepeth Castle in Co. Durham. I lived there myself for a time in 1999 and had many friends there over the years (1991 - 2010) one of whom once read Maud, A Monodrama to me one night in its entirety. Happy days!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come into the Garden, Maud
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 12 Sep 12 - 06:27 AM

There is the story about the great English music-hall singer, Marie Lloyd, which if it isn't true certainly ought to be.

Marie Lloyd was famous for her suggestive lyrics, although all the sauciness was conveyed by gestures and knowing looks, so that she was able to contend that any filth was entirely in the minds of her audience. She proved her point when she was hauled before a local Watch Committee which existed to protect public morality, where she sang 'A Little Bit of What You Fancy Does You Good' in deadpan fashion, and then stunned the members of the committee by rendering 'Come Into the Garden, Maud' in an utterly indecent manner.

Matthew


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Come into the Garden, Maud
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 12 Sep 12 - 07:28 AM

I remember a sketch in the 1950s revue Penny Plain, where Joyce Grenfell replied to a singing of the first verse with a response ~~ "Maud's not coming into the garden, Thanking you just the same"...
Here is a ref from google

Maud's Reply!
http://www.musicsmiles.com/maud's_reply!.htm
This song was written for the review Penny Plain in 1951, by Joyce Grenfell and her cousin Nicholas Phipps. ... Maud's not coming into the garden. Thanking you ...


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