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Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)

GUEST,Alan 28 Nov 12 - 06:40 AM
Matthew Edwards 28 Nov 12 - 09:09 AM
GUEST,Alan 28 Nov 12 - 09:57 AM
Steve Gardham 28 Nov 12 - 04:06 PM
GUEST,Alan 29 Nov 12 - 03:12 AM
Artful Codger 29 Nov 12 - 05:00 PM
GUEST 10 Jul 17 - 02:12 PM
GUEST 10 Jul 17 - 02:14 PM
Reinhard 10 Jul 17 - 02:54 PM
Jim Dixon 13 Jul 17 - 01:18 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: GUEST,Alan
Date: 28 Nov 12 - 06:40 AM

I'm working on the songs Ralph Vaughan Williams noted in King's Lynn, Norfolk, UK, in 1905 and cannot find lyrics for several titles despite extensive research. Can anyone help please?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 28 Nov 12 - 09:09 AM

Hi Alan,

As Paul Davenport has written in reply to your query about the lyrics to 'Near Scarborough Town' it is very difficult to know what songs Vaughan Williams was referring to in his mss notebooks. It was hard for him to collect both the tune and the words on every occasion, and it seems he often focussed on the tunes, expecting to be able to find a set of words elsewhere. Unfortunately some of the working titles he used in his notebooks are, as you have found, frankly mystifying. It might be possible to match some tunes from the mss with tunes of other possible versions, but even so we still can't be 100% sure what the song was that Vaughan Williams actually heard, and sadly we will never know what the words were that the singer sang.

In the case of the 'Raven's Feather' the Roud Index gives an alternate title of 'Cruel Father' which suggests it might be a version of the broadside ballad The Cruel Father and Affectionate Lovers as found in the Bodleian Collection, since the first verse does contain the phrase "Her hair was black as a raven's feather..."

Matthew


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: GUEST,Alan
Date: 28 Nov 12 - 09:57 AM

Thanks Matthew for the info and the sympathy. It is indeed necessary to make intelligent guesses about words sometimes.

I've resolutely ignored 'Cruel Fathers' as RVW clearly writes 'Raven's Feather'. I should have been less trusting!
For some reason I have failed to access 'Cruel Father . . ' in Bodley - probably something wrong with my computer. I'll try elsewhere.
Alan


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 28 Nov 12 - 04:06 PM

Alan,
Matthew's link worked perfectly for me, but if you're still struggling let me know and I'll send you a scan of this very common broadside ballad.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: GUEST,Alan
Date: 29 Nov 12 - 03:12 AM

Thanks very much Matthew & Steve.
I now have a set of words which (with some tasteful editing) fit the RVW-KL tune when turned into 8 line verses. Most importantly it's singable.
"Words from English Traditional Songs and Carols, Ed Lucy Broadwood, 1908. From folkinfo.org"

Alan


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 29 Nov 12 - 05:00 PM

Please send me a scan of the RVW tune, so that I can post it here in ABC notation and set up a MIDI link.

Artful Codger
codger at witloose com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 17 - 02:12 PM

Song noted when visiting workhouse at Barnard castle unfortunately no words were noted. See m@hot web site for further details


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Raven's Feather (The)
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 17 - 02:14 PM

Other title was waters of the Shannon


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Subject: ADD: The Servant Man
From: Reinhard
Date: 10 Jul 17 - 02:54 PM

"The Servant Man", as recorded by The Full English in 2013 is based on "The Young Servant Man, or, The Two Affectionate Lovers" in Lucy Broadwood's book English Traditional Songs and Carols (London: Boosey & Co, 1908, p. 38):

THE SERVANT MAN

It's of a damsel both fair and handsome,
These lines are true as I have been told.
On the banks of Shannon, in a lofty mansion,
Her father chambered great stores of gold.
Her hair was black as a raven's feather,
Her form and features to describe who can?
But still this folly belongs to nature
For she fell in love with her servant man.

As these two lovers were fondly talking
Her father heard them and near them drew;
As these two lovers were together walking
In anger home her father flew.
To build a dungeon was his intention,
To part true love he contrived to plan.
He swore an oath on all his mansion,
He would part his fair one from her servant man.

Young Edwin found her habitation,
It was secured by an iron door;
He vowed in spite of all the nation
He'd gain her freedom or love no more.
So at his leisure he toiled with pleasure
To gain the freedom of Mary Ann.
And when he had found out his treasure,
She cried, "My faithful young servant man!"

When her father found that she was vanished
Then like a lion he thus did roar,
Saying, "From Old Ireland you shall be banished,
And with my sword I will spill your gore."
"Agreed," said Edwin, "I freed your daughter,
I freed your daughter, do all you can.
But forgive your treasure, I die with pleasure,
For the one in fault it is your servant man."

When her father found him so tender-hearted
The down he fell on the dungeon floor,
Saying, "Such true lovers must ne'er be parted
Since love can enter an iron door."
So soon they're one to be parted never,
They roll in riches as young couples can.
This fair young lady delights in pleasure
Contented with her young servant man.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE CRUEL FATHER AND AFFECTIONATE LOVERS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 13 Jul 17 - 01:18 AM

This text can be found in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, Vol. 19, No. 112, London, April, 1839, page 415, in an article titled "Horæ Catnachianæ." It is also in several broadsides in the Bodleian collection (Roud Number 539):

THE CRUEL FATHER AND AFFECTIONATE LOVERS

It's of a damsel both fair and handsome—
Those lines are true, as I have been told—
Near the banks of Shannon in a lofty mansion,
Her parents claimed great stores of gold.
Her hair was black as a raven's feather.
Her form and features describe who can?
But still 'tis folly belongs to nature;
She fell in love with a servant-man.

Sweet Mary-Ann with her love was walking.
Her father heard them and nearer drew,
And as those true lovers were fondly talking,
In anger home then her father flew.
To build a dungeon was his intention.
To part true love he contrived a plan.
He swore an oath that's too vile to mention.
He'd part that fair one from her servant-man.

He built a dungeon of bricks and mortar,
With a flight of steps, for 'twas under ground.
The food he gave her was bread and water,
The only cheer that for her was found.
Three times a day he did cruel beat her.
Unto her father she thus began:
"If I've transgress'd now my own dear father,
I'll lay and die for my servant-man."

Young Edwin found out her habitation.
'Twas well secured by an iron door.
He vowed in spite of all this nation
To gain her freedom or rest no more.
'Twas at his leisure, he toiled with pleasure
To gain releasement for Mary-Ann.
He gain'd his object and found his treasure.
She cried: "My faithful young servant-man!"

A suit of clothing he bought his lover.
'Twas man's apparel her to disguise,
Saying: "For your sake I'll face your father.
To see me here will him surprise."
When her cruel father brought bread and water,
To call his daughter he then began.
Said Edwin: "Enter; I've clear'd your daughter,
And I will suffer,—your servant-man."

Her father found 'twas his daughter vanish'd.
Then like a lion he did roar.
He said: "From Ireland you shall be banish'd,
Or with my broadsword I'll spill your gore."
"Agreed," said Edwin, "so at your leisure,
Since her I've free'd, now do all you can.
Forgive your daughter; I'll die with pleasure.
The one in fault is your servant-man."

When her father found him so tender-hearted,
Then down he fell on the dungeon floor.
He said: "True lovers should not be parted,
Since love can enter an iron door."
Then soon they joined to be parted never.
To roll in riches this young couple can.
This fair young lady, midst rural pleasure,
Lives blest for ever with her servant-man.


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