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Thomas Leixlip The Proud

GUEST 15 Dec 12 - 08:10 AM
mikesamwild 15 Dec 12 - 09:22 AM
alex s 15 Dec 12 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,leeneia 15 Dec 12 - 11:43 AM
Jack Campin 15 Dec 12 - 12:34 PM
mikesamwild 16 Dec 12 - 06:05 AM
Jack Campin 18 Dec 12 - 03:38 PM
GUEST,GUEST 21 Oct 15 - 11:14 AM
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Subject: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 12 - 08:10 AM

My mate Mile Lydyat and I play a lot of Carolan tunes and as it's not in the 'Book' by O'Sullivan he contacted Bonny Shaljean the harpist who said it wasn't by Carolan. In searching further we found that is actually from a song Tho' Leixlip is Proud, about Leixlip near Dublin having lovely woods etc . It seems that O'Neill may have seen Tho' (Though) as Thos. short for Thomas and bagged it as another Carolan tune. It's certainly a great tune but then there were lots of Baroque influenced tunes and songs from operas etc at the time from all over Britain and Ireland. Carolan was certainly open to all influences. I'll put up some links


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: mikesamwild
Date: 15 Dec 12 - 09:22 AM

I am given as 'Guest' actually Mike Wild of Sheffield (must log in !)
The tune is also called The Humours of Glynn and was used by Burns for his song about groves of sweet myrtle which also figure in the song in the opera the Poor Soldier by William Shield composer at Drury Lane . The song is sung by Pat the poor soldier about Norah dear Norah the theme of his song. The first line has 'Tho' Leixlip is proud of it's close shady bowers'It was clearly set in Ireland though written by an Englishman and in colonial times the toffs and ordinary folk would have heard in in Dublin etc. Patsy Tuohy and Willie Clancy played it as a Jig (The Sligo Rambler) or elaborate air.The tune is also known as Nora Criona or Wise Nora


The misattribution s by Grattan Flood and O'Neill are mentioned on The Traditional Tune Archive


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: alex s
Date: 15 Dec 12 - 09:43 AM

Hi Mike. Give my regards to "Mile"(Mike) Lydyat. Tell him we enjoyed his playing at Burnley Folk Club and we'd be very happy to see him again any time.


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 15 Dec 12 - 11:43 AM

Thanks for the info. To me, the tune sounds so much like a quick dance that I suspect it was around for a while before somebody put words to it.

How does one pronounce 'Leixlip'?


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: Jack Campin
Date: 15 Dec 12 - 12:34 PM

"Humours of Glen" was a very popular tune in the 18th century, particularly in Scotland, where several elaborate variation settings of it were composed, usually for the flute. It seems to have been much more popular in Scotland than in its country of origin. I have a ballad from the early 19th century set to it on my site about the music of Edinburgh - probably of English origin, it's about catching syphilis from a prostitute.

I don't think any Scottish source called it "Thomas Leixlip" or associated it with Carolan, though it was often labelled as Irish.

Shield may have had stuff produced at Drury Lane, but he was in no sense "at" the pace permanently. He was from Tyneside and spent most of his life there. His biggest hit, "Rosina", was either premiered or got its biggest shot of publicity in Edinburgh. A tune he quoted in that was picked by Burns and Thomson for "Auld Lang Syne", and it's quite likely Burns got the idea of writing words for "The Humours of Glen" from Shield too, though his note on "Their Groves of Sweet Myrtle" seems to imply he knew it from elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: mikesamwild
Date: 16 Dec 12 - 06:05 AM

Thanks Jack the words I saw were on a facsimile from the Edinburgh Musical miscellany song XXXIII held in National Library of Ireland. Please Pm me your email address and i'll send some links if you want. Mike


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Dec 12 - 03:38 PM

I've read the Edinburgh Musical Miscellany right through, there are several copies in Edinburgh libraries. That one didn't make much impression on me - maybe Burns was right.

The EMM won't necessarily have preserved the original tune name - if they named it at all, they'll have used the tune title best known in their own time, which would probably have been "The Humours of Glen". Have you traced a copy of Shield's libretto? What tune name does he use?

My bet is that the tune started out as "The Humours of Glen". Oswald called it that in The Caledonian Companion in the 1740s.


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Subject: RE: Thomas Leixlip The Proud
From: GUEST,GUEST
Date: 21 Oct 15 - 11:14 AM

Leixlip is pronounced Lee-ix-lip just do you know


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