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Shiny parts on matt finish guitar

GUEST,Orson Trap 29 Dec 12 - 12:06 PM
GUEST,leeneia 29 Dec 12 - 02:57 PM
GUEST,Ray 29 Dec 12 - 03:54 PM
GUEST,Orson Trap 29 Dec 12 - 04:15 PM
michaelr 29 Dec 12 - 05:23 PM
GUEST,Ray 29 Dec 12 - 05:55 PM
Commander Crabbe 29 Dec 12 - 07:35 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 29 Dec 12 - 08:15 PM
Crowhugger 29 Dec 12 - 08:46 PM
Will Fly 30 Dec 12 - 04:13 AM
GUEST,Backwoodsman 30 Dec 12 - 05:09 AM
Henry Krinkle 30 Dec 12 - 05:15 AM
Will Fly 30 Dec 12 - 10:04 AM
GUEST,shayleen 10 Nov 13 - 06:59 AM
GUEST,Orson Trap 10 Nov 13 - 10:11 AM
GUEST,shayleen 10 Nov 13 - 10:47 AM
Backwoodsman 10 Nov 13 - 11:09 AM
Rumncoke 10 Nov 13 - 11:10 AM
Backwoodsman 11 Nov 13 - 03:12 AM
GUEST 03 Jan 14 - 05:06 PM
GUEST 04 Jan 14 - 04:17 AM
Backwoodsman 04 Jan 14 - 04:51 AM
Backwoodsman 04 Jan 14 - 04:58 AM
JohnInKansas 09 Feb 14 - 08:20 PM
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Subject: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Orson Trap
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 12:06 PM

I have a Martin D16GT (Gloss Top),the back and sides have a satin (matt) finish. Part of the back has become shiny where it rests on my body. What can I do to make the rest of the satin parts shiny?   I don't just want to try something and hope that it doesn't do any damage. I know that there are a lot of guitar experts out there, help please.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 02:57 PM

If it were mine, I would contact Martin Customer Service and ask their advice.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Ray
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 03:54 PM

I suspect not very much. A matt finish contains some sort of dulling agent in the final coat but constant contact with clothing on the back or with your hand on the neck/arm on the top, will inevitably make it go glossy.

You could try matting it down again with steel wool but do it too often and you'll eventually wear the finish off.

Shiny patches are one of the drawbacks of opting for a matt finish which is presumably why the likes of Martin stuck to shiny finishes for the first 150 years or so of their guitar production.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Orson Trap
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 04:15 PM

I do not fancy trying to recreate the matt finish, anybody know what I can use to make the rest of the guitar body shiny?


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: michaelr
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 05:23 PM

Just like what made the first bits shiny: Polish with a soft cloth for a long time.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Ray
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 05:55 PM

Strip it and re-finish in gloss is the only sure way. Either that or simply put up with it and play the thing. All matt guitars go like that eventually.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Commander Crabbe
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 07:35 PM

Leave it as it is! All guitars have got to have mojo.

It ain't what it looks like that's important.

Has the shiny bit affected the sound? I doubt it.

I used to have a full head of hair but now I have a shiny patch. Doesn't bother me none.

I would let it grow old gracefully.

But hey, that's up to you.

CC


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 08:15 PM

Thousands of people have successfully buffed matt finish guitars up to full gloss. All it takes is some good rubbing compound, a soft buffing cloth, some elbow grease, and a little patience.

However, be aware that even though the alteration you'd be making to a guitar by buffing the finish out is strictly cosmetic, it may violate the terms of some manufacturers' warranties. You may want to check with them first.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Crowhugger
Date: 29 Dec 12 - 08:46 PM

"...and a little patience."
Bwl: heh heh you are a master of understatement :-)


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Will Fly
Date: 30 Dec 12 - 04:13 AM

My advice is: leave it to age gracefully and naturally. If the guitar sounds good and looks good to the audience, don't let the natural wear/shine on the back worry you.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Backwoodsman
Date: 30 Dec 12 - 05:09 AM

It's perfectly feasible and the results can be excellent. Many Martin afficionados buff out their satin guitars, especially the 15 series 'Hogs.There are a lot of threads about buffing out satin finishes on the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum, do a search on there. One thing to watch out for - don't use any polishing materials that contain silicone, it makes finish repairs much more difficult down the line.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Henry Krinkle
Date: 30 Dec 12 - 05:15 AM

Leave it alone.
=(:-( ))


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Will Fly
Date: 30 Dec 12 - 10:04 AM

Do nothing to it and, eventually, with a little care and attention, it'll look like this...


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,shayleen
Date: 10 Nov 13 - 06:59 AM

Commander and ray are right. Play it, enjoy it and concentrate on its positives, nobody can see the back when you are playing it anyway! :-)


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,Orson Trap
Date: 10 Nov 13 - 10:11 AM

The reason for the question in the first place was, because I didn't want to leave it like that.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST,shayleen
Date: 10 Nov 13 - 10:47 AM

Sure and i get that. I was just being silly. If unhappy with it try a competent repaiarer. But be careful as there are not that many :-)


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 10 Nov 13 - 11:09 AM

Orson, did you follow up on my suggestion to check out the UMGF for threads on the topic? Buffing out Matt-finishes on Martins is quite common amongst the members there, with some excellent results.

UMGF member Peter Cree seems to be something of an expert on the process, but lots of others have buffed guitars out.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Rumncoke
Date: 10 Nov 13 - 11:10 AM

Metal polish.

One for chrome or silver - the finer ones. Put the polish on the pad and spread it out before starting work, never put the polish onto the thing you are polishing, it can leave a mark which is difficult to remove.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 11 Nov 13 - 03:12 AM

The process involves wet-sanding with, IIRC, 1500-grit wet-and-dry paper, then polishing in steps using a couple of Meguiar's products - might be no.5 and no.2 - the sanding levels the surface of the finish, and helps prevent 'orange-peel' effect appearing due to the pores in the mahogany.

Strongly suggest you research the threads on the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum before you begin working on the job, there's a lot of experience and knowledge on that forum. There's a search facility.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Jan 14 - 05:06 PM

I've shined up several Martin 15 series guitars with great success.
I think they look better than the factory full-gloss versions and certainly better than the satin versions. Certainly more natural. GHS Guitar Gloss, old t-shirts and patience will get you what you want. Don't listen to the "let it age naturally" purists. the shiny "patches" from natural wear look stupid and the satin finish picks up terrible sleeve noise. Good luck!


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jan 14 - 04:17 AM

GHS guitar gloss is the way to go.

Pat


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 04 Jan 14 - 04:51 AM

Here ya go:-

Buffing out a satin finish on a Martin 15-Series guitar

Although the article refers specifically to the 15-Series, it applies to all satin-finished Martins.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 04 Jan 14 - 04:58 AM

The reference to Meguiar's no longer being recommended is due to suspicions that they contain silicone. It's perfectly possible to do the process using products which don't contain silicone - I've buffed a number of satin necks and head stocks on my Martins using Planet Waves 'Restore' Polish, followed by Lizard Spit.

Stew-Mac's Restoration Polish also comes recommended, but they can't ship outside North America.


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Subject: RE: Shiny parts on matt finish guitar
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Feb 14 - 08:20 PM

In the process of scanning all my "good" books so I can trash the paper and make a path through the rubble in our home, I just came across a small "booklet" titled Restoration Clinic by Michael M. Dresdner ©1984.

The booklet is a reprint of articles by Dresdner originally published in "Guitar Trader's monthly Vintage Guitar Bulletin," and includes a variety of short pieces on Guitar Refurbishment. While this booklet doesn't answer the question from the OP, it's likely an answer applied in some of his other stuff (?).

I haven't been able to find any indication of whether he is still active, but advertisements for numerous of his books indicates that he has published quite a lot on instrument finishes, as well as several on more general kinds of wood finishing materials and methods.

There is a website at http://www.michaeldresdner.com/ but it appears to be an "archive only." In the "last post" dated 02 Feb 2011, he refers also to www.woodanswers.com where he claims to have posted "more than 8,000 answers to questions" over several years, but this site seems to have disappeared.

The short biographical note in the booklet I just destroyed claima:

Michael was born in a log cabin in the woods, and one of his earliest recollections is of carving a tiny guitar out of a piece of floor board at the age of three, using only a sharpened spoon and the jagged edge of a cracked teething ring. While only five years old, he astounded his family one day with an impromptu concert on the sackbut, an archaic instrument, during a visit to a local museum. Unfortunately, the only witnesses to these early attacks of genius (ie. his family members) steadfastly refuse to verify these stories. In spite of a lifelong desire to be a pig farmer, he agreed to pursue luthiery as the result of losing an election bet while traveling through Bhutan, a tiny country either east or west of Nepal.

Michael's verifiable association with guitars began in college in the late '60's, and by 1970, he was confirmed in the conviction to become a luthier, in spite of a growing suspicion that it was to be a remuneratively thankless endeavor. Unable to secure an apprenticeship in luthiery, he spent most of the seventies working in the furniture field, first apprenticing as a finisher and cabinet maker, and then holding a succession of jobs doing fine furniture work, decorator finishing, and antique restoration. He credits working in the trades with his obviously sound background in the traditional arts of finishing and woodworking. As with so many others, he spent much spare time during these years variously tampering with guitars and such for different friends as an outlet to the frustration of doing something other than that which he desired. Ironically, his first guitar was built during this period after hours in the back room of one of the finest decorator finishing houses in New York.

By 1978 he had left furniture to work exclusively on instruments, sharing a small shop in New York with a harpsichord builder, a pipe organ builder, and another small instrument luthier. From the beginning of 1980, he ran the prestigious Guitar Trader repair shop, building it from a typical guitar store back room operation into a large, comprehensive high quality restoration facility. He has recently taken over as general manager of Guitar Trader.

In lieu of a photo, an embarassingly accurate rendering of him appears on the front cover.


Sounds like my kind of expert, and his replies to questions (that I've seen) seem excellent [he mostly agrees with me] but I'm curious as to whether he is still active and/or how recently he has published anything new - - - (?)

Does anybody know something more about his stuff - especially anything worth stealingbuying?

John


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