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the science of music - BBC prog

Mr Red 31 Dec 12 - 07:53 AM
Dave Hanson 31 Dec 12 - 11:50 AM
Stanron 31 Dec 12 - 01:48 PM
JohnInKansas 31 Dec 12 - 03:18 PM
GUEST,leeneia 31 Dec 12 - 03:19 PM
Nigel Paterson 01 Jan 13 - 09:02 AM
GUEST,leeneia 01 Jan 13 - 01:39 PM
Nigel Paterson 02 Jan 13 - 05:59 AM
cetmst 02 Jan 13 - 07:20 AM
Mr Red 02 Jan 13 - 11:22 AM
Crowhugger 02 Jan 13 - 12:58 PM
Nigel Paterson 03 Jan 13 - 05:12 AM
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Subject: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Mr Red
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 07:53 AM

did anyone see it?
Very interesting, a lot of it was familiar from the New Scientist - if you read it.
The connection of rhythm with locomotion was a revelation. Parkinson's is controllable with the right music.
I say revelation, but I guess I sort of knew it. Whenever I am at a festival and the Morris are playing I synchronise my gait as I pass. Some people notice. It is a visual joke, whimsey, well humour of sorts.

The reason we are attuned to music (the theory goes) is bonding. Put a tribe of 150 in close community and the best way to keep them from internecine rivalry is to do an apparently useless pursuit that requires communal co-operation. I submit - Singing and dancing. Watch a concert - how much movement is there? Why mosh pits?

Science Club listen again Dara O'Briain is a comedian and Astrophysics graduate.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 11:50 AM

I started watching it, I was so enthralled I fell asleep.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Stanron
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 01:48 PM

I'd dozed of earlier to some really boring stuff so I watched it. One of the better bits of telly that night. It supported an idea I've had for some time that we humans have a larger capacity for recognising very complex patterns in sounds than we are generally given credit for. If there are to be more programs like this I'll watch them.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 03:18 PM

Is the ability of people, or groups of them, to focus on the rythm similar to the recently proved ability of dragonflies to "selectively focus" on a single bug in a swarm to target their lunch?

And is the sychronised wing-beating in a flight of geese really "dancing?" (or maybe it's militaristic marching together?)

John


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 31 Dec 12 - 03:19 PM

I wanted to watch, but it only plays in the UK. That's interesting about music and Parkinson's disease.

Apparently there's more to Parkinson's disease than motor problems. A relative of mine suffered from it, and she could not recognize her own reflection in a mirror. In fact, her reflection terrified her. I visited her room in a nursing home, and all mirrors had been removed.

And yet, she remembered me after not seeing me for 15 years, and we had a pleasant, normal conversation.

Thanks for bringing the show up, Mr. Red.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Nigel Paterson
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 09:02 AM

I missed the programme, but hopefully it will be on the BBC iPlayer. I don't suffer from Parkinson's, but I do suffer from Dystonia (Another Neurological condition). It manifests itself in what is termed a 'Resting Tremor' in my right hand & arm. The Dystonic Tremor also responds to musical activity. When I'm not playing guitar or keyboard, the tremor is active to the point that holding a phone to my ear can be almost impossible. As soon as I begin to play, the tremor disappears, but returns immediately playing ceases. Interestingly, I am symptom-free when asleep (so my wife tells me!)
                                                    Happy New Year One & All,
                                                                                             Nigel.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 01 Jan 13 - 01:39 PM

Nigel, thanks for sharing that interesting information. Perhaps somebody someone will use something from music to heal or control a condition such as yours.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Nigel Paterson
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 05:59 AM

A Musical cure for Dystonia, or indeed any of the other afflictions that beset Humankind...wouldn't that be something!
                Keep well & take good care,
                                                          Nigel.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: cetmst
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 07:20 AM

Read Oliver Sachs book "Musicophilia" He discusses cases and gives an extensive list of references


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Mr Red
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 11:22 AM

musicophilia.com/
oliversacks.com/books/musicophilia/
There are more programmes, I have seen 2/6 and it was in the EPG upcoming so look for repeats on air and iPlayer.

The physician treating Parkinson's was based in the US - maybe even NY. They interviewed in what looked like Central Park. The programmes have some pretty luminary scientists on the show. It is entertainment - but intelligent stuff.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Crowhugger
Date: 02 Jan 13 - 12:58 PM

Nigel, your experience of music-making and dystonia exactly parallels my experience with music-making (especially singing) and extreme chronic back pain. While during singing the pain was gone, while even during breaths between lines it returned in full force. At that time I don't know if I would have found the same result from playing instruments--I could not bear the weight of a coffee mug without considerable medication, much less a guitar or banjo. After a couple of years of regular singing the pain became less severe during breaths than it was between songs. And as things improved slowly over a decade to where I could manage instruments, the same "vanishment" of pain occurred as whilst singing. My pain specialist nods and takes my word for it, not being one to look a gift horse in the mouth.


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Subject: RE: the science of music - BBC prog
From: Nigel Paterson
Date: 03 Jan 13 - 05:12 AM

Life & Music never ceases to amaze me.
                                                            Nigel.


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