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Folklore: Hero raised by non-human

MorwenEdhelwen1 13 Feb 13 - 08:19 PM
GUEST,DrWord 13 Feb 13 - 08:30 PM
Joe Offer 13 Feb 13 - 08:30 PM
GUEST,DrWord 13 Feb 13 - 08:32 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 13 Feb 13 - 08:43 PM
McGrath of Harlow 13 Feb 13 - 09:09 PM
McGrath of Harlow 13 Feb 13 - 09:09 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 13 Feb 13 - 10:29 PM
John on the Sunset Coast 13 Feb 13 - 10:43 PM
Beer 13 Feb 13 - 10:46 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 13 Feb 13 - 10:53 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 13 Feb 13 - 11:24 PM
JohnInKansas 14 Feb 13 - 12:21 AM
GUEST,Scabby Douglas 14 Feb 13 - 08:20 AM
Mr Happy 14 Feb 13 - 10:01 AM
Manitas_at_home 14 Feb 13 - 10:35 AM
GUEST,henryp 14 Feb 13 - 01:16 PM
JohnInKansas 14 Feb 13 - 05:36 PM
McGrath of Harlow 14 Feb 13 - 05:46 PM
MorwenEdhelwen1 15 Feb 13 - 04:59 PM
GUEST 15 Feb 13 - 05:29 PM
JohnInKansas 15 Feb 13 - 07:58 PM
Kent Davis 16 Feb 13 - 07:43 PM
JohnInKansas 16 Feb 13 - 09:18 PM
Crane Driver 17 Feb 13 - 11:31 AM
GUEST 17 Feb 13 - 08:58 PM
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Subject: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 08:19 PM

Can anyone name any folktales/fairytales where the hero is raised by a non-human? Or are they practically nonexistent?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST,DrWord
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 08:30 PM

Romulus & Remus? Or does the founding of Rome count as a folktale?


dennis


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 08:30 PM

The story of Romulus and Remus, of course.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST,DrWord
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 08:32 PM

hey Joe! Now let's think of others....

keep on pickin'
dennis


    Notice that Dennis and I both posted at 8:30 - so don't think I'm clueless, just because my message appeared after his.
    -Joe-


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 08:43 PM

The one I know is "Sigurd The Dragon Slayer," a Norse tale with the titular Sigurd being raised by the dwarf-prince Regin.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 09:09 PM

Depends what you men by 'raised'. The centaur Chiron educated and looked after various heroes, including Achilles, Jason and Esculapius.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 09:09 PM

Depends what you men by 'raised'. The centaur Chiron educated and looked after various heroes, including Achilles, Jason and Esculapius.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 10:29 PM

Forgot about Chiron, thanks McGrath!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: John on the Sunset Coast
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 10:43 PM

Lord Greystoke


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Beer
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 10:46 PM

Clan of the Cave Bear.
adrien


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 10:53 PM

Tarzan isn't a folktale though, as he was created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 13 Feb 13 - 11:24 PM

Mowgli also isn't a folktale.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 12:21 AM

"Born one day when the sun didn't shine.
Raised in a canebrake by an old mama lion."

(also composed, not folk, ... most likely.

John


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST,Scabby Douglas
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 08:20 AM

Some interesting references here:

http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/rrOrphans.html


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Mr Happy
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 10:01 AM

Surely all folk tales were written by someone


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Manitas_at_home
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 10:35 AM

Enkidu in the Epic of Gilgamesh was living with animals as a beast until Gilgamesh arranged for his seduction.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 01:16 PM

You may enjoy this quiz;

Feral children


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 05:36 PM

The Dictionary of Ancient Deities, Patricia Turner & Charles Russell Coulter, Oxford University Press, © 2000, ISBN 13 978-0-19-514504, includes "more than 10,000 entries," including gods, demons, venerated objects, heroes, sacred animals, and a few other categories.

It appears that there are "large numbers" of entries for beings (including humans) who were raised or educated by another entity not of their own species.

Unfortunately the index doesn't provide this information, so it would be necessary to read the entire book (598 pages) (again) in order to make a list. Eventually I might decide to take my book apart and scan it to searchable form (probably pdf or even a doc) but at present I'm reluctant to destroy the original, since it doesn't appear to be easily replaceable if I change my other mind.

The number of such "raised by other" entries found with a little "spot checking" indicates that it's been a very common and apparently persistent theme in (religious?) folklore in nearly all traditions, but most of those named are unrecognizable - and unpronouncable - (by me) and a list would likely be meaningless without inclusion of the associated (unknown by most) mythologies.

This book doesn't appear to include many "heroes" from Western Native traditions (although I haven't looked specifically for that category) and at least a few Native American (US Natives) traditions I've heard have made reference to such traditions, so inclusion of more of these - from all of North, South, and Central America - might make a significant expansion of the usage.

There is significant overlap between those who were raised by (or learned from) another species and those who were another species but cared about humans (preposterous as that seems), and the distinction is sometimes obscure. If anything, this appears to be somewhat less common in the lore most of us know about than in other cultures.

John


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 14 Feb 13 - 05:46 PM

Of course Superman is a case of the reverse situation.

And to stretch it a little, there's Harry Potter. True the Durdsleys are technically human, but highly unsatisfactory Muggles.

And I know it's not a folktale in either case.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: MorwenEdhelwen1
Date: 15 Feb 13 - 04:59 PM

@JohnInKansas: I'll check out that book.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Feb 13 - 05:29 PM

The big hewer? out of the dirt and the darkness I was born . .


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 15 Feb 13 - 07:58 PM

The Dictionary of Ancient Deities indicates a previous (original) publication as "Encyclopedia of Ancient Deities," published by McFarland & Co (North Carolian) in 2000. It might turn up in a used book shop by that name. The version I have is from Oxford Press, but still carries the same © 2000 by Patricia Turner and the estate of Charles Russell Coulter.

The copy I have is the only one I've seen, but it appeared at Barnes, and I found it "by accident." Later inquiry to see if I could get a backup copy failed to produce anything from there, but it might have just been temporarily out of stock. I haven't made a serious search to see if it's easily available elsewhere.

My copy was $35.00 (US) which seemed reasonable give the bulk of the thing. 598 pages and in "uncomfortably small" (mostly 5.5 or 6 point) type for my old eyeballs, but everything's legible enough if I don't try to read it all at once.

(It doesn't seem to contain any of our Kansas politicians or preachers, who seem to "think they're gods" but maybe that'll be in a later edition.)

John


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Kent Davis
Date: 16 Feb 13 - 07:43 PM

Pecos Bill was raised by coyotes, but he may be fakelore instead of folklore.


Kent


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 16 Feb 13 - 09:18 PM

Pecos Bill is probably about as much a folklore hero as Paul Bunyan. Of course with the shorter history (of those who make up tall tales) how long ago the story started has less influence for Western Hemisphere lore than elsewhere, since if we paid much attention to how ancient anything is we'd have exceedingly little to work with.

"Shorty, the lumberjack" is probably too recent to be considered folklore, even here, although he may move into that category if his story persists.

John


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: Crane Driver
Date: 17 Feb 13 - 11:31 AM

Our local saint, St Cenydd, was allegedly cast adrift in a reed boat and brought up by seagulls on the cliffs of Worm's Head, a tidal island. The Celtic saints were a rum lot, by all accounts. Does mediaeval hagiography count as folklore for your purposes? Do 'saints' count as heroes? If so, there are probably other examples.

Andrew


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Hero raised by non-human
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Feb 13 - 08:58 PM

Bob - the -Builder....

(his momma was a fork - lift ....an he never knew his dad)


Why you be axin ' cupid cakes?


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