Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Origins: Donal Og (Young Donald)

Related threads:
Lyr Add: Donal Og - various translations (28)
(origins) Origins/ADD: Dhyana and Donalogue (Sheila Chandra) (11)
Lyr Req: Donal Og (33)
Donal Og: Caitlin Maud's version (7)
Donal Og Radio study (8)
Lyr Req: Donal Ogh (2) (closed)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Donal Og


Stewie 03 Nov 99 - 06:45 AM
Peter T. 03 Nov 99 - 09:00 AM
Stewie 03 Nov 99 - 09:19 AM
Philippa 03 Nov 99 - 09:52 AM
Peter T. 03 Nov 99 - 12:09 PM
Wolfgang 04 Nov 99 - 09:06 AM
johntm 04 Nov 99 - 04:16 PM
Wolfgang 05 Nov 99 - 06:27 AM
Stewie 05 Nov 99 - 08:53 AM
Stewie 05 Nov 99 - 09:14 AM
Wolfgang 05 Nov 99 - 09:49 AM
Philippa 05 Nov 99 - 03:17 PM
Stewie 05 Nov 99 - 07:09 PM
Philippa 05 Nov 99 - 07:15 PM
Philippa 05 Nov 99 - 07:28 PM
Philippa 24 Nov 99 - 01:35 PM
Wolfgang 24 Nov 99 - 01:39 PM
Philippa 24 Nov 99 - 02:34 PM
Philippa 24 Nov 99 - 05:18 PM
Liam's Brother 24 Nov 99 - 06:30 PM
Philipp 26 Nov 99 - 02:39 PM
Philippa 03 Dec 99 - 01:29 PM
Gerry 03 Dec 99 - 02:40 PM
Alan of Australia 03 Dec 99 - 08:37 PM
Wolfgang 09 Dec 99 - 04:55 AM
John in Brisbane 09 Dec 99 - 05:06 AM
Wolfgang 09 Dec 99 - 06:48 AM
John in Brisbane 09 Dec 99 - 08:27 AM
John in Brisbane 09 Dec 99 - 08:31 AM
10 Dec 99 - 05:23 PM
alison 11 Dec 99 - 08:39 PM
GUEST,Trevor Webster 06 May 00 - 05:54 PM
GUEST,Fred 06 May 00 - 05:59 PM
Stewie 06 May 00 - 10:41 PM
AoifeO 07 May 00 - 03:06 PM
GUEST,Judith 24 May 00 - 12:03 AM
Malcolm Douglas 24 May 00 - 12:24 AM
GUEST,Philippa 30 Oct 01 - 07:12 AM
GUEST,Philippa 30 Jan 04 - 08:25 AM
GUEST,Philippa 06 Feb 04 - 12:31 PM
GUEST,Philippa 06 Feb 04 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,Philippa 10 Feb 04 - 06:26 AM
GUEST,Philippa 25 Mar 04 - 02:21 PM
GUEST 30 Mar 04 - 04:23 PM
GUEST 27 Nov 04 - 04:58 PM
GUEST,James Dixon 10 Mar 06 - 06:25 PM
Jim Dixon 13 Mar 06 - 07:45 AM
GUEST,rich merne 24 Mar 06 - 03:52 PM
GUEST,Philippa 25 Mar 06 - 07:32 AM
GUEST,Polly 26 Jul 06 - 02:03 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Lyr Add: DONAL OG / YOUNG DONALD^^
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Nov 99 - 06:45 AM

'Donal Og' is surely one of the most moving of Irish love songs. A song of betrayal, obsession and grief – a young girl's cry as desolate as the moonscape of the Burren – and Al O'Donnell's stunning performance of it was one of the high points of the folk revival. It is a disgrace that his albums are no longer available.

DONAL OG (Young Donald)

O Donal Og when you cross the ocean
Take me with you when you are going
At fair or market you'll be well looked after
And you shall sleep with the Greek king's daughter

O lad of fairness, O lad of redness
O lad so fair my mind's in sadness
When I think of another in your name calling
The top and the bottom of my hair starts falling

My mother ordered me to shun you
Today, tomorrow and on Sunday
Too late, in vain o'er spilt milk grieving
Closing the door on a bygone thieving

O you said you would meet me, but you were lying
Beside the sheep shed as day was dying
I whistled and called you, twelve times repeating
But all that I heard was the young lambs bleating

If you come at all, come when stars are peeping
Rap the door that makes no squeaking
My mother will ask you to name your people
And I'll say you're a sigh of the night wind weeping

I got the first kiss and from no craven
I got the second atop the stairway
The third kiss came as down he (sic) laid me
But for that one night, be still a maiden

The last time I saw you was a Sunday evening
Beside the altar as I was kneeling
It was of Christ's passion that I was thinking
But my mind was on you and my own heart bleeding

For you took what's before me and what's behind me
Took east and west when you wouldn't mind me
Sun, moon and stars from me you've taken
And God as well if I'm not mistaken

Traditional.

Source: Al O'Donnell 'Al O'Donnell 2' The Leader Tradition LTRA 501. A version in Irish (with translation) may be found in Peter Kennedy (Ed) 'Folksongs of Great Britain and Ireland' Cassell, London 1975. One of the 'big' Gaelic songs, it is also found in Scots tradition. There are myriad versions of the song and, in fact, a book has been devoted entirely to it: 'Donal Og' by Seosamh O Duibhginn Dublin 1960. A number of translations are sung and Al learned this poignantly beautiful version from Seamus Ennis.

I not sure whether the change of person in the third last stanza was deliberate or merely a slip on the singer's part.
^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Peter T.
Date: 03 Nov 99 - 09:00 AM

Lovely song -- Stewie, do you know any versions of it on record that are easily available?
yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Nov 99 - 09:19 AM

Peter, I'm not sure. I will look for you, but none springs to mind in my collection because I felt the O'Donnell version was so good - in fact, it probably my all-time favourite folksong. I can make a tape of the O'D version for you, though, if you send me a personal message with an address.

Cheers, Stewie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Dónal Óg
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Nov 99 - 09:52 AM

Al O'Donnell's recording is good, all the songs on it.
another English translation of Dónal Óg is sung by the Sands Family (Ann Sands sings Dónal Óg) on "You'll Be Well Looked After", EMI Green Label LEAF 7005; Gerry Shannon sings in English on "Shannon Waves" (Cló Iar-Chonnachta); June Tabor, The Peel Sessions, Strange Fruit SFPS 015; Sheila Chandra, Weaving My Ancestors' Voices
Suasan McKeown on Bushes and Briars (Alula Records)(I don't know which language she sings the song in)

in Irish:

Seosaímhín Ní Bheaglaoich on Taobh Na Gréine-Under the Sun
Breandán Ó Beaglaoich (Begley)(a brother of Seosaimhín) on We Won't Come Home 'Til Morning Kells Music
Máire Aine Ní Dhonnchadha on Ceirníní Cladaigh / Claddagh Records
Noirín Ní Ríain on Celtic Soul

The Ulster version is quite different from the better known Conamara version. I think Daithí Sproule may have recorded it. I've heard Lilis Ó Laoire and Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh sing it, but I don't think either of them has recorded this song.
Some of the Irish language verses are at Liam Hart's pages and at this Irish Folksongs site


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Peter T.
Date: 03 Nov 99 - 12:09 PM

thanks for the prompt responses! I will send you a message, Stewie, if it isn't too much trouble. yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 04 Nov 99 - 09:06 AM

There is a version as well (English) on the LP 'The McKenna Brothers life at O'Donoghue's'. Can't be called 'easily available' though. I prefer the Al O'Donnell version by far. Until now, I only had lyrics close to his version. Thanks a lot, Stewie, for changing this.

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: johntm
Date: 04 Nov 99 - 04:16 PM

Joe Heaney has a version in Irish in The Best of Joe Heaney My Tradition Shanachie records


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 06:27 AM

This is for me one of the best songs ever writting. I relistened last night Al O'Donnell singing it and it was as great as ever.
BTW, Stewie, I hear the "you" in verse 6, which makes more sense and is in both written versions I have. Al O'Donnell has a strong aspiration for that syllable and it sounds more like "hue" but I'm sure he's trying to sing "you".
Seamus Ennis is not just the "source" for this version, he is the author of the (this?) English translation.
I have a printed version (in a German book on 'celtic' music) which has not all of the verses above, but has the following additional verse (before verse 4 above):

Oh and Donal Og you'll not find me lazy,
not like some high born expensive lady,
I'll do your milking and nurse your baby,
and if you're beset on I'll defend you bravely.

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Stewie
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 08:53 AM

Thanks, Wolfgang. You are quite right - on listening to it carefully a few more times, he is saying 'you' but, on the surface, it sounds like 'he'. I know that extra stanza that you quote very well and it puzzled me why it wasn't there because I thought O'D sang it. I must have it on some version somewhere in my collection, but I don't know by whom. I had all my stuff on a database until my old computer had a complete meltdown a couple of years ago and I haven't had the inclination to do it all again. Since I have been concentrating on oldtimey over the last few years, my memory of what I have, or where, in Irish and UK material is somewhat deficient. It will probably annoy me now till I find it.

Cheers, Stewie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Stewie
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 09:14 AM

Wolfgang, I found the McKenna version, but it's not the one I'm looking for. The McKennas have your extra verse and also the fine verse that contains the great line about 'Black as a footprint in shining hallways' which I now recall also. Isn't that in the printed version that you have? Have extra verses, possibly from the versions in Irish, been added to Ennis' translation?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 09:49 AM

Stewie, no this verse is not in my printed version. My one version is a xerox from a record cover without further information and only few verses, the other version is in Jake Walton, Keltische Folksongs, which seems to be a reliable source, as far as I can tell. The notes say Copyright Seamus Ennis, tune (and Gaelic lyrics): trad. The book gives two further recordings, The Fureys on 'A dream in my hand' and Ray Fisher (no title).
I have no idea, whether additional verses have been added to the translation or whether all versions we have are just subsets of the original translation.
My version from the book has this order of verses: Verse 1 (your version), verse 7, my additional verse, verse 4, verse 5, verse6, verse 8.
None of these verses are identical to the ones you posted, but mostly the differences are minor. The largest difference is in your verse 7, my verse 2, which would make no sense at position 2 with O'D's words. Jake Walton prints:

Well I saw you first on a Sunday evening,
down at the altar as I was kneeling,
about Christ's passion that I was reading,
but my eyes were on you and my poor heart bleeding.

Isn't that a fine variant?
Philippa (above) has given links to Gaelic lyrics (the first link leads to the tune in ABC). I'd love to see here a verbatim translation.

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dónall Óg ^^
From: Philippa
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 03:17 PM

The Séamas Ennis translation is close enough to the literal meaning, at least for those verses for which I have the Irish, but only two of the 4 verses on the websites (links above) are in his version. The other two verses are ones I've heard Donegal singers do (to a different air than the one used in Conamara)

A Dhónaill Óig, má théir thar fharraige
Beir mé féin leat 's ná deán dom dearmad
Beidh agat féirín lá aonaigh 'gus margaidh
Agus níon Rí Gréige mar chéile leapa 'gat

is equivalent to Ennis verse 1

Gheall tú dom-sa ní nach dearn tú
Fáinne óir a chur ar 'ach méar domh
Seisreach óir fána hanlaí airgid
Agus muileann siúchra ar 'ach sruth in Éirinn

You promised me things you didn't do, to put gold rings on each of my fingers... and sugar mills on each stream in Ireland

B'fhurast dom aithne nach tú bhí i ndán dom
Chuir tú amach mé oíche na báistí
Bhain truisle dom-sa ag giall na bearnadh
Char dhúirt tú Dia liom 's char chraith tú lámh liom.

I easily realised you weren't intended for me; you sent me out on a stormy night, ...you didn't welcome me or shake my hand

Bhain tú soir 'gus bhain tú siar dom
Bhain tú romham is bhain tú mo dhiaidh dom
Bhain tú 'n ghealach is bhain tú an ghrian dom
'S is ró-mhór m'eagla gur bhain tú Dia dom.

is equivalent to the final verse in the Ennis/O'Donnell rendering

Ennis' verse 2 is verse 7 as sung by Máire Áine Ní Dhonnchadha on "Deora Aille" (Claddagh Records):

A Ghile na Finne 's a Ghile na Ruaichte
A Ghile an 's tú d'fhága mé buartha
Nuair a chloisim trácht ar na mná dá luadh leat
Titeann an bun díom agus barr na gruaige.

Ennis verse 4 ~ Ní Dhonnchadha verse 2:

Gheall tú dhomhsa agus rinne tú breag liom
Go mbeifea romhamsa ag cró na gcaorach;
Lig mé fead agus dhá bhlai dhéag ort.
'S ní raibh romham ach na huain agus iad a' méilí

Ennis verse 7 ~ Ní Dhonnchadha verse 3

Siúd é an Domhnach a dtug mé grá dhuit
A' Domhnach díreach roimh Dhomhnach Cásca
Is tú ar do ghlúine a' léamh na Páise
Sea bhí mo dhá shúil a' síor-thabhairt grá dhuit.

"You were on your knees reading the passion, and my two eyes were constantly giving love to you"; it does make more sense that Dónal was reading and she was looking at him!

Ann Sands sings the verse about milking the cows and nursing the baby. The translation is credited to Frank O'Connor.

Probably originals for all the translated verses can be found in Seosamh Ó , "Dónall Óg", published in Dublin (Baile Atha Cliath) by an Clóchomhar in 1960. He even includes Fear a' Bhàta because of one verse common to versions of both songs!

^^


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Stewie
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 07:09 PM

Thanks Philippa. For those who may be interested, the 'black' verse mentioned above is:

Black as the sloe is the heart that's in me
Black as the coal is the grief that rives me
Black as a footprint in a shining hallway
'Twas you that blackened it forever and always

For you took etc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Philippa
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 07:15 PM

Ennis verse 3 ~

Dúirt mo mhaithrín liom gun labhairt leat
Inniú ná amarach nó Dé Domhnaigh
Is olc an tráth a dtug sí rabhadh dhom
Is é dúnadh an dorais é tar éis na foghla

Ennis verse 6 ~

Fuair mé póigín is ní ó chladhaire
An dara póigín ag gabháil a luí dhom
Agus murach an phóg sin bheinnse i mo mhaighdean

I haven't found no.5, but the line, Ma thagann [or 'thig'] tú choíche/ Ná tar [or 'tig'] ach san oíche (if you come at all, come at night) is found in other songs, both in Irish and Scottish Gaelic// The last line of the Ennis verse puts me in mind of "The Whistlin Thief"

another verse in the O' Connor translation is

Oh black as a sloe is the heart that's in me
Black as the coal is the grief that binds me
Black as a footprint in shining hallway
'Twas you that blackened it, forever and always.

{I typed this for pasting in before I read Stewie's message}
This is similar to the Irish verse:

Tá mo chroí-se chomh dubh le hairne
Nó mar ghual dubh a dhóifí i gceárta
Agus tá lionn dubh mór os cionn mo gháire.

now, can anyone come up with original Irish for Ennis verse 5 and also for O'Connor verse 3 (in the Sands' rendering) which is almost the same as the one Wolfgang gives about milking the cow and nursing the baby?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Dónall Óg)
From: Philippa
Date: 05 Nov 99 - 07:28 PM

sorry, I left out the third line of two verses!

Ennis verse 6 ~

Fuair mé póigín is ní ó chladhaire
An dara póigín ag gabháil a luí dhom
An triú póigín ag gabháil a luí dom
Agus murach an phóg sin bheinnse i mo mhaighdean

O'Connor Black (dubh) verse ~

Tá mo chroí-se chomh dubh le hairne
Nó mar ghual dubh a dhóifí i gceárta
Nó le bonn bróige ar hallaí bana
Agus tá lionn dubh mór os cionn mo gháire.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Philippa
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 01:35 PM

Other translations of this song are by
1) Lady Gregory (a contempory of Yeats) - "Donall Oge", published in Brendan Kennelly, ed, "Between Innocence and Peace: Favourite Poems of Ireland", Cork: Mercier (no date given, but recent publication)
2) Seán Lucy - "Donal Ogue", published in Lucy, Unfinished Sequence", Dublin: Wolfstone, 1979 nad Seán Dunne, ed., "Poets of Munster", London: Anvil and Dingle, Co. Kerry: Brandon , 1985

Both have the verse about milking the cow; here is Lady Gregory's version:

O Donall Oge, it is I would be better for you
Than a high, proud, spendthrift lady:
I would milk the cow, I would bring help to you;
And if you were hard pressed, I would stike a blow for you.

In the chapter of Munster versions in the book, I found this Irish for the above verse::

A Dhomhnall Óig, b'fhearr dhuit mise agat
Ná bean uasal uaibhreach iomarcach
Do chrúdhfainn bó agus do-ghéanainn cuigean duit,
Is, dá mba cruaidh é, do bhuailinn buille leat.

Here is the "If you come at all, come when stars are peeping" verse in Irish, from one of the Munster versions published in

Má thagann tú 'n aon chor tar ist oidhche [ist =ins an t; oidhche=oíche]
Tar sa dorus go mbeidh an tsíon ann
Fiar(fh)óghaidh mo mháithrín cia ro díobh thú,
A's dearfad-sa leithe gur ab síol don gaoith thu.

(Munster is the southern-most province of Ireland.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 01:39 PM

Philippa, thanks so much for all these informations. Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Dónal Óg (Young Donald)
From: Philippa
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 02:34 PM

A huge omission in my previous message! The book from which I quote some verses in Irish is Seosamh Ó Duibhgeain [spelling?], "Dónall Óg", published in Dublin (Baile Átha Cliath) by an Clóchomhar in 1960


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Philippa
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 05:18 PM

The Lady Gregory translation can also be found in Kathleen Hoagland, ed. "1000 Years of Irish Poetry", Old Greenwich, Conn: Devin-Adair (out of print)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 06:30 PM

I can add that Ray Fisher sang Donal Ogue on the Topic LP, The Fisher Family (12T137). Donal is Daniel in English.

All the best, Dan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Philipp
Date: 26 Nov 99 - 02:39 PM

Thanks, Daniel, for reminding me about Archie Fisher. On the Topic recording, The Fisher family, Joyce Fisher sings "Donal Ogue", accompanied I believe by Archie Fisher on guitar. She sings the Frank O'Connor translation, the same version Ann Sands sings with her family. I gather that O'Connor translated more verses than are sung here, because the Fisher Family album notes say that "a full version of the text can be found in Frank O'Connor's 'Kings, Lords and Commons'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Dónal Óg (Young Donald)
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Dec 99 - 01:29 PM

The Seán Lucy translation is also published in S. Lucy,ed. "Love Poems of the Irish", Cork: Mercier, 1967
And I hear that Patrick Pearse also translated "Dónal Óg"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Gerry
Date: 03 Dec 99 - 02:40 PM

Chantan singer, Christine Kydd, has a good version of Donal Og in her CD 'Primary Colours'. The whole CD is very good actually.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 03 Dec 99 - 08:37 PM

G'day,
If anyone had a MIDI (or ABC or anything)go to the Mudcat MIDI site and email me a copy. I'll post it on the site.

Cheers,
Alan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 09 Dec 99 - 04:55 AM

Alan, I'll send a tape to Alison within the next two weeks with the Al O'Donnell LP on one side, both for this tune and for 'Lord Abore and Mary Flynn' (and for other beauties).

Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 09 Dec 99 - 05:06 AM

Wolfgang, I'd better not deny Alison a marvellous gift from you - so please send the tape as planned, but I'll notate the tune in the next few hours. I don't know the song at all, so I'm looking forward to playing it. Regards, John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 09 Dec 99 - 06:48 AM

Fine, let's both go on, John. Wolfgang


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tune Add: DONAL OG / YOUNG DONALD
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 09 Dec 99 - 08:27 AM

Here's the toon. My email is playing up, but I'' get it to MUDI as soon as I can. REgards, John

MIDI file: donaldog.mid

Timebase: 96

Text: Donal(d) Og
Tempo: 120 (500000 microsec/crotchet)
TimeSig: 3/2 144 8
Start
0480 1 67 064 0096 0 67 064 0000 1 69 064 0096 0 69 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 67 064 0144 0 67 064 0000 1 69 064 0048 0 69 064 0000 1 67 064 0096 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 60 064 0048 0 60 064 0000 1 64 064 0144 0 64 064 0000 1 62 064 0048 0 62 064 0000 1 60 064 0192 0 60 064 0000 1 60 064 0096 0 60 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 69 064 0192 0 69 064 0000 1 71 064 0144 0 71 064 0000 1 69 064 0048 0 69 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0096 0 64 064 0000 1 62 064 0048 0 62 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 64 064 0288 0 64 064 0000 1 60 064 0096 0 60 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 72 064 0192 0 72 064 0000 1 74 064 0144 0 74 064 0000 1 72 064 0048 0 72 064 0000 1 69 064 0096 0 69 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 67 064 0096 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 62 064 0048 0 62 064 0000 1 64 064 0192 0 64 064 0000 1 67 064 0096 0 67 064 0000 1 69 064 0048 0 69 064 0000 1 71 064 0048 0 71 064 0000 1 72 064 0144 0 72 064 0000 1 71 064 0048 0 71 064 0000 1 69 064 0048 0 69 064 0000 1 71 064 0048 0 71 064 0000 1 67 064 0048 0 67 064 0000 1 64 064 0048 0 64 064 0000 1 64 064 0144 0 64 064 0000 1 62 064 0024 0 62 064 0000 1 60 064 0024 0 60 064 0000 1 64 064 0144 0 64 064 0000 1 62 064 0048 0 62 064 0000 1 60 064 0288 0 60 064
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the January 15 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T: Donal(d) Og
M:3/2
Q:1/4=120
K:C
G2|A2GEG3AG2EC|E3DC4C2EG|A4B3AGE2D|EEE6C2EG|
c4d3cA2GE|G2EDE4G2AB|c3BABGEE3D/2C/2|E3DC6||


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 09 Dec 99 - 08:31 AM

Sorry, should have mentioned that the version I wrote out comes from Kennedy's fine book.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From:
Date: 10 Dec 99 - 05:23 PM

To my ears, there's a slight difference between the tune published by Kennedy (and sung by Conamara Irish singers such as Máire Áine Ní Dhonnchadha and Seosamh Ó hEanaí) and that sung by Al O'Donnell. Although the Sands and Fisher families sing the Frank O'Connor translation and Al O'Donnell sings the Séamas Ennis translation, they use the same air. I think there is enough difference between the tunes Alison will get from John (for Irish language) and from Wolfgang (for English language) be worth doing midis for both. She can judge that for herself when she examines them. [I wrote this before I saw that John had posted his midi]



Ó Tuama & Kinsella, "An Duanaire: Songs of the Dispossessed" Dublin:Dolmen Press/ Bord na Gaeilge, 1981 has a good long text for Dónal Óg, with Irish verses and their translation by Thomas Kinsella. Other songs which have featured at Mudcat can be found in this book: Eanach Dhúin (Anach Chuain), a Óganaigh Óig, Roisín Dubh, Droimeann Donn Dilis - all in Irish with English translations. Unfortunately music is not included.

Another publication of the Lady Gregory translation is in McDonagh & Robinson, ed. "The Oxford Book of Irish Verse" (Oxford University Press, several editions)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: tune add: Donal Og (Young Donald) ^^
From: alison
Date: 11 Dec 99 - 08:39 PM

Tune for Donal Og now available at Mudcat MIDIs ^^

slainte

alison


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Trevor Webster
Date: 06 May 00 - 05:54 PM

I have Al O'Donnell 2 on vinyl. I have been told in both England and Ireland that both 1 and 2 have been deleted. Does anyone know if they exist on tape or CD as Al O'Donnell is one of my favourite traditional singers and my album is getting worn and scratched.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 06 May 00 - 05:59 PM

Got your message.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Stewie
Date: 06 May 00 - 10:41 PM

Unfortunately, they remain unavailable in any format. We will have to wait until the cretin who holds the rights to the Leader/Trailer catalogues decides to release them (if ever). So far only a couple of Dransfields tracks and a Dave Burland LP have surfaced.

--Stewie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: AoifeO
Date: 07 May 00 - 03:06 PM

There is a lovely version of this song on an album by Georgia Rose and Suzannah Armstrong-Park, daughters of Jenny Armstrong. It is indeed a gorgeous song. This version is particulary heartfelt and moving.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Judith
Date: 24 May 00 - 12:03 AM

I was so pleased to come across the discussion of this song, though it is quite late in the thread. Nice to finally see the lyrics written out, since I invariably mis-hear something in every set of lyrics.

I don't know if she ever recorded it, but I heard Bonnie Shalgeen (sp?) sing it during an interview with her & Packy Burn twenty or more years ago. She used verses 1,5,7,& 8 of Stewie's originally posted set (using "when first I saw you" rather than "when last I saw you"), plus the extra stanza that Wolfgang sent (inserting this between 5 & 7).

(If anyone knows the proper spelling of her name, I'd appreciate knowing it. And does anyone know if Packy has passed on by now?)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 24 May 00 - 12:24 AM

Bonnie Shaljean (you were close!) did record it, on Roundtower (Dingle's Records DIN 311, 1981), which she made with Packie.  Last I heard, he was frail, but still very much alive.

Malcolm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: DÓNAL ÓG / YOUNG DONALD
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 30 Oct 01 - 07:12 AM

I found more verses of the O'Connor translation in Patrica Craig, ed.: "The Oxford Book of Ireland"

DÓNAL ÓG
(18th century Irish) Translation by Frank O'Connor

Donal Ogue, when you cross the water,
Take me with you to be your partner
And at fair and market you'll be well looked after,
And you can sleep with the Greek king's daughter.

You said you would meet me, but you were lying,
Beside the sheepfold when the day was dying,
I whistled first, then I started hailing,
But all I heard was the +young lambs' wailing.

You said you'd give me – an airy giver! -
A golden ship with masts of silver,
Twelve market towns to be my fortune
And a fine white mansion beside the ocean.

You said you'd give me – 'tis you talk lightly!-
Fish-skin gloves that would fit me tightly,
Bird-skin shoes when I went out walking,
And a silken dress would set Ireland talking.

Ah, Donal Ogue, you'd not find me lazy,
Like many a high-born expensive lady;
I'd do your milking and I'd nurse your baby,
And if you were set on I'd back you bravely.

To Lonely Well I wander sighing,
'Tis there i do my fill of crying,
When I see the world but not my charmer,
And all his locks the shade of amber.

I saw you first on a Sunday evening
Before the Easter and I was kneeling,
'Twas about Christ's passion that I was reading,
But my eyes were on you and my own heart bleeding.

My mother said we should not be meeting,
That I should pass and not give you greeting;
'Twas a good time surely she chose for cheating
With the stable bare and the horse retreating.

You might as well let him have me, mother,
And every penny you have moreover;
Go beg your bread like any other
But him and me don't seek to bother.

Black as the sloe is the heart inside me,
Black as the coal with the griefs that drive me,
Black as the boot print on shining hallways
And 'twas you that blackened it ever and always.

For you took what's before me and what's behind me,
You took east and west when you wouldn't mind me,
Sun and moon from my sky you have taken,
And God as well, or I'm much mistaken.

line breaks fixed by mudelf


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 30 Jan 04 - 08:25 AM

re. the message of 10 Dec 99 - 05:23 PM: I don't have Kennedy's book to hand, but if my memory is correct, he published the Donegal tune for Dónal Óg. That version is available on a recording of Maighread Ní Dhomhnaill, I believe. The tune is quite different than that sung by the Conamara singers, which in turn is slightly different (and more ornamented) than the way the song is sung in English translations.

I haven't listened to the midis to compare, but there are plenty of recordings of this song available in both Irish and English (even if you can't get a copy of Al O'Donnell).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Dónal Óg
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 06 Feb 04 - 12:31 PM

Although there is a lot of information in this thread, it is very scattered. I found among my papers a photocopy of a 14-verse rendition of Dónal Óg paired with Seán Lucy's 15-verse translation. Five of Lucy's verses are not in the Irish-language version on the photocopy, and the Irish-language version includes four verses that aren't translated by Lucy. I have re-arranged the Irish-language verses to correspond more closely to the Lucy translation; the numbers in parentheses represent the 'original' order of the verses. Where Lucy has a verse that is not in this Irish-language version, I have inserted that verse in Irish from other sources. Irish-language verses 1, 10, 12 & 13 are not in the Lucy translation so I have bracketed my own rough translation (I'm not very satisfied with my verse 13 translation!).

DÓNAL ÓG (anon. 17-19th centuries, translated by Seán Lucy)

Donal Óg, if you cross the water
Take me with you and don't forget to;
At fair and market you shall have a fairing
And the Greek King's daughter for your bed-companion.

If you go away I've a way, I've a way to know you;
Two green eyes and the bright fair head of you,
Adozen curls on your top-knot clustering -
Like a bright yellow flag or a rose in flowering.

And late last night the watchdog spoke of you,
The snipe declared you in the deepest bogland,
And you, like lonely wild goose, gone through the wodlands -
And be lonely always until you marry me.

You made a promise, and you told a lie then,
To come and meet me where sheep are folded,
I whistled loud and I shouted often
With no reply but a small lamb bleating.

You made a promise, one of difficulty,
A fleet of gold with masts of silver,
A dozen towns, in each a market,
And a limewhite palace beside the seashore.

You made a promise, a thing unlikely,
That you would give me fine gloves of fishskin,
That you would give me fine shoes of bird skin,
And a suit of silk, the dearest in Erin.

O Donal Óg, I would be better for you,
Than a noble lady proud and haughty,
I'd milk the cow and I'd turn the churn for you,
And if things were difficult I'd strike a blow for you.

O my grief! And it's not the hunger,
The want of food, drink, or sleep enough,
That has left me so thin and perishing,
But a young man's love that has surely wasted me.

At early morning I sighted my true love
Up on horseback riding the roadway,
He passed me by and he didn't call me,
On returning home again I was crying sorely.

When by myself at the Well of Lonesomeness
Sitting down I make my sorrowing,
I see the world and no trace of my darling,
With the glow of amber on his warm cheeks shining.

That was the Sunday I gave my love to you,
The very Sunday before Easter Sunday,
I was reading the Passion on my knees devoutly
While still my two eyes were sending my love to you.

Mother said to me not to speak to you
Today nor tomorrow nor on the Sunday,
But bad the time she chose for telling me,
Twas locking the door up after the robbery.

Mother, my little one, give me to him,
And also give to him all of your property,
Out yourself and beg for charity
And don't come East or West to find me.

My heart is black as a sloe inside me,
Or the blackest coal that's in the forge there,
Or a dark footprint in the gleaming hallways,
and 'twas you who turned my life so black and bitter.

You've taken East from me and you've taken West from me,
And what's before me and what's behind me,
You've taken sun from me and you've taken moon from me,
And my fear is terrible you've taken God from me.

DÓNAL ÓG

A Dhónaill Óig, má théir thar fharraige
Beir mé féin leat 's ná deán mo dhearmad
Beidh agat féirín lá aonaigh is margaidh
Agus iníon Rí Gréige mar chéile leapa 'gat (4)

Má théir anonn tá comhartha agam ort:
Tá cúl fionn is dhá shúil ghlasa agat,
Dhá chocán déag i do chúl buí bachallach
Mar bheadh béal na bó nó rós i ngarraithe. (5)

Is déanach aréir a labhair an gadhar ort,
do labhair an naoscach sa churraichín doimhin ort:
Tú id' chaonaí uaigneach ar fuaid na gcoillte,
Is go rabhair gan chéile go héag go bhfaighir mé. (6)

Gheall tú dhomsa, is rinne tú bréag liom,
Go mbeifeá romham ag cró na gcaorach;
Lig mé fead agus dhá ghlao dhéag ort.
'S ní bhfuair mé romham ach na huain ag méiligh. (7)

Gheall tú dhomsa ní ba dheacair dhuit,
Loingeas óir faoi chrann seóil airgid,
Dhá cheann déag de bhailte margaidh.
'S cúirt bhreá aolta cois taobh na farraige. (9)

Gheall tú dhomsa ní nár bh'féidir,
Go dtabharfá laimhinní de chraiceann éisg dom
Go dtabharfá brógaí de chraiceann éan dom
Agus culaith don tsíoda ba dhaoire i nÉirinn. [based on a verse from Munster in Ó Duibhgeáin*]

A Dhomhnall Óig, b'fhearr dhuit mise agat
Ná bean uasal uaibhreach iomarcach
Chrúfainn bó agus dhéanfainn cuigean duit,
Is dá mba cruaidh é do bhuailinn buille leat.(3)

Och, och ón, agus ní le hocras,
Uireasa bídh, dí ná codlata,
Faoi ndeara domsa bheith tanaí trochlaithe,
Ach grá fir óig is é bhreoigh go follas mé. [published in Ó Duibhgeáin]

Is moch ar maidin do chonaic mise an t-ógfhear
Ar mhuin chapaill ag gabháil an bóthar,
Níor dhruid sé liom is níor chuir ná stró orm,
'S ar mo chasadh abhaile dhom 'sea do ghoileas mo dhóthain. [published in Ó Duibheagáin]

Nuair a théimse féin go Tobar an Uaignis*
Ag tabhairt an turais ar son mo ghrá ghil -
Níl mo shúil leat inniu ná amárach,
A mhuirnín dhílis, mo mhíle slán leat. (8)

Siúd é an Domhnach a dtug mé grá dhuit
A' Domhnach díreach roimh Dhomhnach Cásca
Is tú ar do ghlúine a' léamh na Páise
Sea bhí mo dhá shúil a' síor-thabhairt grá dhuit. [verse from Máire Áine Ní Dhonnchadha]

Dúirt mo mháithrín liom gan labhairt leat
Inniú ná amarach nó Dé Domhnaigh **
Is olc an tráth ar thug sí rabhadh dhom -
Is é fál ar an ngort é i ndiaidh na foghla. (11)

A mháthairín dhílis, tabhair mé féin do
Tabhair a bhfuil agat de'n tsaol go léir do
Téigh, thú féin, ag iarraidh na déirce,
Is ná gabh siar ná aniar dom' éiliú.
[Connacht verse published in Ó Duibhgeáin; I have substituted a Munster line closer to Lucy's for line 2: Tabhair na ba is na caoirigh go léir do give him all the cattle and sheep]

Tá mo ghrá-sa ar dhath na sméara [my love is the colour of blackberries]
Is ar dhath na n-airní lá breá gréine, [and the colour of the sloe on a sunny day]
Ar dhath na bhfraochóg ba dhuibhe an tsléibhe, [the hue of the darkest bilberry on the mountain]
'S is minic a bhí ceann dubh ar cholainn ghléigeal. [it's often a black head was on a bright body] (1)

Tá mo chroí-se chomh dubh le hairne
Nó le gual dubh a dhóifí i gceárta
Nó le bonn bróige ar hallaí bana
Agus tá lionn dubh mór os cionn mo gháire.(2)

Ní raibh id' ghrá-sa ach mám den tsneachta gheal, [your love was but a handful of bright snow]
Nó gaineamh i dtrá i lár na farraige, [or sand of the beach in the middle of the ocean]
Nó feóchan gaoithe thar dhruim na ngarraithe, [or a gust of wind on the over the garden]
Nó tuile thréan do bheadh t'réis lae fearthainne. [or a heavy flow after a day of rain (i.e., temporary)] (10)

Is mithid dom féin an baile seo a fhagáil; [it's time for me to leave this place]
Is géar an chloch 's is fuar an láib ann; [where the stone is sharp and the mud is cold]
Is ann a fuaireas guth gan éadáil [it's there I got a call that came to nothing]
Agus focal trom trom ó lucht an bhéadáin. [and a heavy heavy word from the gossipers] (12)

Fuagraim an grá - is mairg a thug é [I declare that love was an affliction]
Do mhac na mná úd ariamh nár thuig é [to the son of any woman who didn't understand it (?)]
Mo chroí ' mo lár gur fhág sé dubh é [my heart in my breast is left desolate by him/by it]
Is ní fheicim ar an tsráid seo ná in áit ar bith é. [and I don't see him on this street or anywhere else](13)

Bhain tú thoir dhíom 'gus bhain tú thiar dhíom
Bhain tú 'n ghealach is bhain tú an ghrian díom
Bhain tú an croí geal a bhí ' mo chliabh dhíom
'S is ró-mhór m'fhaitíos gur bhain tú Dia dom.(14)

* Verses published in "Ceol na nOileán" and "Amhrááin Ghrádha Chúige Chonnacht" reported by Seosamh Ó Duibhgeáin begin "Gheall tú dhomsa is rinne tú bréag liom/go gcuirfeá gúna orm de chlúmhach na n-éanlaith" - You promised, but it was a lie, that you would dress me in a gown of birds' feathers.

**Changed from "Tobar Phádraig" & "Aon lá den tseachtain ná Dé Domhnaigh" in this version. "Tobar an Uaignis" and "inniu nó amarach ..." , from other versions of the song, are even closer to Lucy's translation)

The translation by Lady Gregory may be found at thread 4277.
Most people singing in English use either the Séamus Ennis or Frank O'Connor translations. Also at thread 4277, Wolfgang gives a compilation of his favourite verses for singing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 06 Feb 04 - 12:34 PM

re my message of 24 Nov 99: Kathleen Hoagland, ed. 1000 Years of Irish Poetry was re-issued in the last year or two. I don't have the publication details, but it would not be hard to look up.

Re: messages from Judith and from Malcolm Douglas 24 May 00 : I notice Bonnie Shaljean has been posting at Mudcat over the past year. I saw Packie Byrne launching a book in Ardara, County Donegal last year. Frail yes, but still getting about and in great form. He was also at the Inishowen traditional singing festival (I forget was that 2002 or 2003 or both?)

Re: Donegal version, Dónall Óg is on a recording of Éamonn Mac Ruairí and Patricia Nic Ruairí of Tory Island on "Toraigh Ó Thuaidh" CIC023 (Cló Iar-Chonnachta)

Recordings of Conamara versions are available from the same company:
CIC088   Máire Uí Dhroighneáin, Peatsaí Ó Ceannabháin and Pat Phádraic Tom Ó Conghaile, "Tógfaidh Mé Mo Sheolta "
CIC022   Treasa Ní Mhiolláin, "An Clochar Bán"

Probably more difficult to get a copy of is Róisín Elsafty singing Dónall Ó on the 1996 recording she made with her mother Treasa Ní Cheannabáin, "Irlande: l'art du sean-nós" on Buda Musique


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 10 Feb 04 - 06:26 AM

in Abhráin Grádh Chúige Connacht - Love Songs of Connacht (1893), Douglas Hyde includes a song of 5 verses which he collected, called - after its first line - "Dá dtéidhinn-se siar", If I were to go west, and the verses are similar to verses of Dónal Óg.

He has two of the verses which I did my own translation for above:
Tá mo ghrá-sa ar dhath na sméara...
Instead of "Ar dhath na n-airní", Hyde has ..."Ar dhath na súgh-craobh", so his translation reads:

My love is of the colour of the blackberries
And the colour of the raspberry on a fine sunny day.
Of the colour of the darkest heath-berries of the mountain,
And often has there been a black head upon a bright body.

For the verse beginning "Is mithid dom ..." Hyde's translation is:

Time it is for me to leave this town,
The stone is sharp in it, and the mould is cold;
It ws in it I got a voice (blame), without riches,
And a heavy word from the band who back-bite.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 25 Mar 04 - 02:21 PM

I happened to come across a real audio sample of Roisín Elsafty singing Dónall Óg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Mar 04 - 04:23 PM

Bian O'Rourke has a song in English called Aisling Óg. It is sort of a parody on Dónall Óg, as if Dónall is talking to the one who's talking to him in the Irish song. Same tape as the bodhrán song that people seem to know best.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Nov 04 - 04:58 PM

Michael McGoldrick has Dónall Óg on his album 'Fused.' It's a great recording, you all should go check it out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,James Dixon
Date: 10 Mar 06 - 06:25 PM

Have any of you heard Barbara Dickson's version of this beautiful song on her album (now very difficult to get hold of as out of production) "Parcel of Rogues". Very emotional and powerful. This is an incredibly moving song, especially the last verse. Hope you all get a chance to enjoy Barbara's version.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 13 Mar 06 - 07:45 AM

FYI: That wasn't me who posted that last message. Is there another person with the same name lurking around? Strange but not impossible, I guess. If so, you're welcome to use the name James, since I never use it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr. Eamon a chnoi
From: GUEST,rich merne
Date: 24 Mar 06 - 03:52 PM

Ĕamon a' Chnoic (The version that I know with a rough trans. Rich Merne, '06)
Cé hé sin amuigh, a bhuil faobhar ar a guth,
S'tá'g reabadh mo dhorais dúnta?
Mise Ĕamon a' chnoic atá báite fúair fliuch,
Ó shíorshúil na sléibhte s'na gleannta.

Is fada mis' 'muigh faoi sneachta's faoi sioc
Is gan dánacht agam ar éinne
Mo shéisreach gan scor, s'mo bhranar gan cur,
Agus gan íad agamsa ar aon chor

Níl cáirde agam, is danaid liom san,
Chun do glachadh mé moch agus déanach,
'Nois do caithigh mé dul thar farraige shoir
Ó 's ánn nach a' bhuil mo ghaelta.

Ó a lao ghil s'a chuid céard a dhéanaimse dhuit'
Mura gcuirfhinn tu féin faoi mo ghúna,
Is nach mbéidh púdar dubh á shiorshéadadh leat,
Ach go mbéimish (together) múchta.   Trans. (le chéile)

Ó mo mhallacht ar'n díamhall ar dhúnmharraidh é,
Is go dóiteann sé 'n-ifreann (forever)
Ach an t'Úasal Ó' Ríain, Ó go mbaireann do h'anam
Ar dheis Dé anois is I gcónai……Trans. (On God's right hand now and forever)
…………………………………………………………..
O! who's that without, with a trembling shout,
Now rattles my door that is bolted?
This is Eamon a' Chnoic and I'm drowned wet and cold,
From traversing the mountains and valleys.

I'm long perished in snow, and in ice and in gale,
I am famished, my life's nearly ended,
My land's without mark, and my fields without seed,
They're no longer my own (ar aon chor) Trans. (in any case)

I haven't a friend to call early or late,
From my family I'm hid and alone,
(Thar na farraige shoir), I must exile from here, Trans. (over the Eastern seas)
And must live in the land of the stranger.

O! my darling, my dote, what am I to do
But to cover you up with my gown,
So that powder and shot will not blast you alone,
But that we'll be together extinguished.

O! my curse on the fiend who has murdered my dear,
May he burn up for ever in Hades,
But my darling Ó'Ríain, may your soul be at rest,
Ar dheis Dé anois is I gcónaí. Trans. (do.)
The story of Edward Ryan………………..Eamon a' Chnoic.(Eamon of the Hill or Eamon th'Hill)

   In the sixteen hundreds, Eamon Ryan, a Tipperary land-owner was dispossessed by Oliver Cromwell's forces. He was from Cnoc MaothailI (the bald hill) in Teampall Beag, Co. Tipperary. A tenant of Ryan's – a widow, was also dispossessed of her cow by one of Cromwell's agents. Eamon a' Chnoic defended her and in the argument he killed the agent.
   He was outlawed and went on the run with a price of two hundred pounds (a lot of money then) on his head. After hiding in the mountains in the winter, where he was destroyed by exposure; he took refuge with an old lover of his who hid him in her house for a time. Its said that the agents looked for him at her house but that she successfully hid him under her dress. Presumably the dress was hanging up or thrown on a bed, but that she wasn't wearing it at the time. Subsequently, Ryan took refuge with a neighbour who killed him for the reward while he slept. Unknown to the neighbour, the reward had been withdrawn shortly beforehand because of Ryan's intercession and influence with his friends in authority. Posterity doesn't record the names of his faithful girlfriend or his treacherous neighbour.
   Edward Ryan's head is alleged to be buried in a very old graveyard at Dun Bleisce in Limerick.
   This story seems to have considerable historic and folklore credence, and it certainly moved the great bard Turlough O'Carolan to give it to posterity.
R.M.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 25 Mar 06 - 07:32 AM

Rich, your message would fit better in a different thread, for instance http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72285#1247934, (Eamonn a' Chnoic) or the "Ned of the Hill" thread


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Donal Og (Young Donald)
From: GUEST,Polly
Date: 26 Jul 06 - 02:03 PM

Hello everyone.

I have noticed the last post in this thread was not that long ago (March 2006), so I am hoping to get an answer to my question.

There is a movie "The Dead" by John Huston, based on Joyce's story from "The Dubliners". In the movie, Gabriel (if I am not mistaken) is reading "Donal Og", its English translation. As far as I remember, one of the verses began like this: "My mother told me not to be seen with you......... It was shutting the door after the house was robbed". Anyway, there is nothing like that in the book itself - Gabriel did not read it. However, for some reason, John Huston decided to put this scene in the movie. I would like to know, who is the author of "Donal Og", because a few years ago, when I looked it up in Google, I found a reference to Lady Gregory. However, in some book I read about Irish history it is said that Joyce was actually the only famous Irish author not recognized by Lady Gregory, and that he even "got back at her" by composing some nasty limerick about her. If anybody knows anything about this, please, let me know.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 18 October 1:01 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.