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Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman, Mr. Yunupingu

Helen 02 Jun 13 - 06:10 PM
Sandra in Sydney 03 Jun 13 - 03:32 AM
Helen 04 Jun 13 - 05:28 AM
ranger1 04 Jun 13 - 09:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 05 Jun 13 - 05:25 AM
Helen 05 Jun 13 - 05:16 PM
ranger1 05 Jun 13 - 06:11 PM
Helen 05 Jun 13 - 06:23 PM
Sandra in Sydney 05 Jun 13 - 10:51 PM
Helen 06 Jun 13 - 06:33 PM
Sandra in Sydney 06 Jun 13 - 07:06 PM
Helen 06 Jun 13 - 07:45 PM
Helen 29 Jun 13 - 02:44 PM
Janie 29 Jun 13 - 04:39 PM
Andrez 29 Jun 13 - 07:05 PM
Helen 29 Jun 13 - 07:15 PM
Bugsy 29 Jun 13 - 08:30 PM
Andrez 29 Jun 13 - 09:38 PM
Sandra in Sydney 30 Jun 13 - 06:08 AM
Helen 30 Jun 13 - 03:59 PM
Joe Offer 30 Jun 13 - 04:25 PM
Sandra in Sydney 01 Jul 13 - 10:59 AM
Bugsy 01 Jul 13 - 07:46 PM
Helen 07 Jul 13 - 04:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 07 Jul 13 - 10:37 PM
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Subject: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 02 Jun 13 - 06:10 PM

Mandawuy Yunupingu and the band Yothu Yindi revolutionised the Australian commercial music scene by bringing indigenous (Australian Aboriginal) music fusion to the awareness of millions of us. Their hit single Treaty took off on the commercial charts, and in my opinion a lot of other indigenous musicians took hope from the band's success.

Apart from that, Mandawuy Yunupingu was an amazing man and a gentle man, with strong convictions. He will be sorely missed all over Australia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-03/former-yothu-yindo-frontman-mundaway-yunupingu-dies/4728518

Former Yothu Yindi lead singer Mandawuy Yunupingu has died overnight at his home in the Northern Territory.

The former Australian of the Year was 56 years old.

He died at his home in Yirrkala in Eastern Arnhem Land.

Yunupingu had been fighting kidney disease for several years.

Hi biography is here:

http://www.cdu.edu.au/garma/MANDAWUY%20YUNUPINGU%20BIO.pdf

Unfortunately, I think Mandawuy Yunupingu's death from kidney disease at the age of 56 also raises a lot of concerns over indigenous health in Australia, but I'll leave that discussion until later.

For now, rest in peace, gentle and honourable man.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 03 Jun 13 - 03:32 AM

Yothu Yindi's promo-video for the hit single 'Treaty' Treaty taken from the 1992 album 'Tribal Voice.

*This was the original version before the hit dance-remix version*

RIP Mr Yunupingu


-----------------------

article from http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-03/former-yothu-yindi-frontman-m-yunupingu-dies/4728518

Yothu Yindi lead singer Yunupingu has died overnight at his home in the Northern Territory.

The former Australian of the Year, who was 56, died at his home in Yirrkala in Eastern Arnhem Land.

He had been fighting kidney disease for several years.

Yunupingu brought his local people, the Yolngu people, and Indigenous issues to a national stage with his musical career.

He co-founded Yothu Yindi in 1986, and was the band's lead singer and most prominent personality.

He broke records throughout his life, becoming the first Indigenous Australian from Arnhem Land to gain a university degree.

M Yunupingu

    The first Indigenous Australian from Arnhem Land to gain a university degree
    Co-founded Yothu Yindi in 1986
    Became Australia's first Aboriginal principal in 1990
    Named Australian of the Year in 1992 for his role in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.
    He was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2012
    Yothu Yindi won eight ARIA music awards, including Song of the Year for Treaty
    The band released six major albums, from 1988 to 2000
    Died aged 56 at his home in Yirrkala, NT, after fighting kidney disease for several years

In 1990 he also made history when he took over as head of the Yirrkala Community School, making him Australia's first Aboriginal principal.

He was named 1992 Australian of the Year for his work as a musician and educator and his work in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

He leaves behind a wife and six daughters.

His nephew, Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, who was born blind, also became an award-winning musician in his own right.

His first album Gurrumul won accolades and rose up the ARIA charts after its release in 2008.

Biographer Robert Hillman says M Yunupingu had a great sense of mission about his people.

"Music played an important part in the life of the Yolngu people all together. They are very musical people," he told ABC News Breakfast.

"It was part of [his] vision that music could become a political agent in making the broad mainstream Australia more aware of the rich Indigenous culture of his people."

Mr Hillman says Yunupingu became a legend in Australia's music history, and will be remembered for bringing Indigenous issues to a larger stage.

"He was one of the generation of Indigenous Australians who saw a different way ahead, and what they brought to the consciousness of Australia is going to be valued forever," he said.

"[Yunupingu] himself is a giant amongst his people and a legendary figure in Australian music."

Yothu Yindi was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame last December.

Yothu Yindi has won eight ARIA awards, including Song of the Year in 1992 for Treaty, and Best Indigenous Release for Tribal Voice.

The band released six albums, starting with Homeland Movement in 1988 and finishing with Garma in 2000.

The founder of the National Indigenous Music Awards, Gavin Jones, says Yunupingu left a firm stamp on the music, Australian and Aboriginal communities.

"He was juggling a very important place culturally in his community, being an Australian ambassador, an Australian of the Year," he said.

"He was the centrepiece to an internationally acclaimed rock band and also a community education leader."
Music world remembers 'incredible man'

Music industry personality Molly Meldrum says he met Yunupingu many times and admired him.

"He was highly intelligent as well and he always treated everyone the same," he said.

"He was always open, he would somehow bring light into the room wherever he went.

"He was just an incredible man."

Australian music entrepreneur Michael Gudinski signed Yothu Yindi for their first album, well before Treaty came out.

He says Treaty remains a great iconic Australian song.

"I think a lot of people were very ignorant. I think a lot of people got on to it initially just because of the incredible dance beat and the whole vibe of it," he said.

"But I think a lot of intelligent people a lot of people found a lot more meaning than just a dance track and really listened to the amazing lyrical content."

Music specialist and biographer Aaron Corn says apart from his music, Yunupingu will also be remembered for his role in education.

"His wonderful music and the legacy of Yothu Yindi the band is something that Dr Yunupingu will be remembered for by most people around the world and most Australians, but the thing that I think should also be remembered for he was a great intellectual ... he was a great teacher and pedagogue," he said.
Garrett, Gillard, Snowdon, Wyatt, Abbott all pay tribute

Education Minister Peter Garrett, who was friends with Yunupingu and worked with him in his role as lead singer with Midnight Oil, paid tribute on Twitter this morning.

    Can't believe he's gone, my dear friend. A path breaker and leader. A shining light for his people. Rest in peace Mr Yunupingu.

    — Peter Garrett AM MP (@PGarrettMP) June 2, 2013

Mr Garrett helped to induct Yunupingu into the ARIA Hall of Fame last year and says he first met him with Midnight Oil in the early 80s.

"To be truthful about it I think we're still in a bit of shock about it here in Canberra," he said.

"He was a very dear friend. He was an outstanding leader. He was a highly successful musician, if you consider what Yothu Yindi achieved, and he's gone too young."
Video: Garrett pays tribute to Yunupingu (ABC News)

A statement from Prime Minister Julia Gillard's office describes Yunupingu as a "uniquely talented musician, a passionate advocate for Aboriginal people and a truly great friend".

"He will be remembered for his tremendous musical achievements ... he will also be remembered as a great educational leader and a champion for the Yolngu people," it said.

"He leaves a great body of work to inspire us and we will need all of that inspiration, for so much work remains undone."

Indigenous Health Minister Warren Snowdon says apart from his music legacy, Yunupingu was a great educator and health advocate.

He says he only saw Yunupingu at a renal workshop he had organised last month in Nhulunbuy.

"He was present at it for the whole day. He was hopeful of being well enough at some point to have a transplant, sadly that was not to be," he said.

During a tribute in Parliament, Indigenous MP Ken Wyatt, highlighted Yunupingu's education work.

"Mr Yunupingu worked first as a teacher and then as an Aboriginal principal in the Northern Territory," he said.

"This began an incredible journey to increase awareness about Aboriginal Australians and bring all Australians closer together in a combined vision for our nation's future - a vision that continued until death and I hope will continue in Australia's collective consciousness far into the future."

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott says Yunupingu was "a great leader of his people".

"He was obviously a significant cultural leader figure to the wider Australian community as well as amongst Aboriginal people," he said.

"It's tragic that he's gone and I guess it's very sad that he's gone at such an early age - but this is one of the real problems in modern Australia. Too many Aboriginal people die too young."


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 04 Jun 13 - 05:28 AM

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Yothu+Yindi&oq=Yothu+Yindi&gs_l=youtube.12..0i3l3j0l7.19350.19350.0.20571.1.1.0.0.0.0.393.393.3-1.1.0...0.0...1ac.2.11.youtube.gy8vOEmPkis


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: ranger1
Date: 04 Jun 13 - 09:04 PM

Thanks for that link, Sandra. I did know he'd died, as I follow Midnight Oil on Facebook, but I wasn't familiar with Yothu Yindi's music.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 05 Jun 13 - 05:25 AM

Farewell to Yolngu royalty, bridge builder, statistic

by Tracee Hutchison

Mr Yunupingu and Yothu Yindi swept us all up in the fervour of possibility. Yet can there be any more shameful indictment that this talented musician, and former Australian of The Year, died of a treatable illness in Australia in 2013, asks Tracee Hutchison.

He was a crocodile man from saltwater country. A Gumatj elder. Yolngu statesman. Arnhem Land royalty. A Teacher and a Songman. Driven by a profound belief that two-way learning would bridge the gap between Yolngu (Indigenous) and Balanda (non-Indigenous) Australians.

We were one. We just hadn't worked out how to get there. And he seemed born to sing us there.

When I met Mr Yunupingu in the late 1980s I was a Balanda girl who thought music could change the world. And he had the songs to do it.

There'd been others, notably, before him - the Warumpi Band, No Fixed Address, Coloured Stone - but none had crossed the great divide.

But when Mr Yunupingu arrived at JJJ's Sydney studios on tour promoting Yothu Yindi's debut album Homeland Movement his vision was tangible. He could see it. And so could I.

That record played like a healing stone of the times - the hallmark of Yothu Yindi's nomenclature - mother and child. Nurturing, guiding, lighting the path.

The Bi-Centennial lingered in the air and had left an uneasy disquiet. But Homeland Movement gave a soundtrack to the inclusive two-way system of learning Mr Yunupingu trail-blazed as Yirrkala's first Indigenous school principal. One side in English, the flipside in Gumatj - rich with the thousands-year-old songlines that had shaped him.

From the opening track Mainstream which spoke of the 200-year-old cultural straddle between black and white to the cautionary tales of Yolngu Boys and Yolngu Women, that proud tribal voice boomed from North-East Arnhem Land like a megaphone of hope.

Mr Yunupingu disarmed me completely in that first radio interview. A tone he set for many more encounters.

And he told me he was a crocodile man. That he was of the land and the saltwater that shaped that totem croc. They were one. Created by the rainbow serpent, forever entwined in his dreaming. He let me in to a spirit of place to open a window of explanation and understanding.

His passion and belief was fuelled by a political dynasty that had delivered his clan the first land rights and mining royalties from the famed 1963 bark petition. He spoke from a place of possession not dispossession. The first Aboriginal person I had ever met that could.

It was the first time I really understood the difference. It was right there in front of me.

And Yothu Yindi swept us all up in the fervour of possibility.

When I first heard Treaty it was an acoustic plea from the heart but it wasn't until two balanda DJ's from Melbourne got hold of it that it set the nation's collective foot tapping and hearts soaring.

Somehow we all believed we could dance it into reality and there was Mr Yunupingu singing up the country as Australian of the Year.

Australia was changing before our eyes. Paul Keating made the Redfern speech, Yothu Yindi was on top of the world and Treaty became an international calling card.

They played the Sydney Olympics, the Oils wore Sorry shirts and Cathy won the 400. Come on Australia. It was right there for the taking.

But it didn't deliver. And it took a heavy toll where it mattered most.

The rivers of grog that had flowed during the good times kicked back with unforgiving vengeance. And as the lights faded on Yothu Yindi's international music career Mr Yunupingu became a different kind of statistic.

The one that illuminates the stark over-representation of kidney disease in Aboriginal people, particularly in remote communities.

The last time I saw Mr Yunupingu was at the Yothu Yindi Foundation's wonderful Garma Festival in Gumulka, deep in North East Arnhem land.

It was 2007. And Mr Yunupungu had just emerged from a stint in rehabilitation. Grog-sickness.

We sat down in the dirt and remembered those heady, halcyon days when we both believed music would change the world. We spoke about a Treaty, 16 years after his song had danced its way into music charts all over the world and wondered how and where it went wrong. What difference it might have made.

To Mr Yunupingu it was the centrepiece of the two-way system. Of the elusive bridge between black and white.

"Everyone else everywhere else in the world seems to have a treaty," he lamented. "Why can't we have a treaty?"

It seemed so simple, yet as we spoke the federal Labor Government was preparing legislation for the NT intervention and the concept of a treaty could not have been further from reality.

While his view on this may have softened in more recent times, I remember well the despair he expressed as he spoke of what the intervention represented: "I'm disappointed. As a modern, educated person would be".

He told me he thought the clocks were being turning back for Aboriginal people, that the scales were tipping over against the best interests of his people.

And he spoke of his profound regret that he had let people down with the grog. That he had failed to live up to the great expectations as a role model for so many Yolngu people. And it pained him as much as the illness itself.

We talked about having to travel to Darwin for treatment and difficulties that posed for Indigenous people living remotely on country. Of the extra challenges that posed for people on the transplant waiting list.

I couldn't believe this was my country too. That something so simple as a kidney transplant could be so hard.

When Mr Yunupingu took to the stage later that night, it was a frail but resilient refrain that rang out across the Garma faithful… "Well I heard it on the radio, and I saw it on the television, back in 1988 all those talking politicians…"

I doubt there was a dry eye in amongst us. There was pride and joy and celebration and triumph. And we danced.

I doubt there has been a more profoundly moving induction into the ARIA Hall of Fame than Yothu Yindi's last year.

And I doubt there is a more shameful indictment on us all that Mr Yunupingu died from a treatable illness in Australia in 2013. There are no cheap words to describe the magnitude of that.

But as a balanda girl who still wants to believe music can change the world I feel humbled and privileged to have been changed by him and I am forever indebted.

The music lives on....

Tracee Hutchison was JJJ presenter from 1986-1990 and interviewed Mr Yunupingu many times for radio, TV and print over 25 years. She currently broadcasts on ABC News Radio and Radio Australia.

-----------------------

Avoidance of naming the dead Traditionally, this meant avoiding referring to the dead person by name directly after their death as a mark of respect[4] — and also because it is considered too painful for the grieving family. Today the practice continues in many communities, but has also come to encompass avoiding the publication or dissemination of photography or film footage of the deceased person as well.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 05 Jun 13 - 05:16 PM

I have to admit that I am surprised that only two other Mudcatters have contributed to this thread, but I am assuming that most Americans & Brits have not heard of him and the band Yothu Yindi.


Avoidance of naming the dead:

This makes it difficult to discuss him by name, but media articles use the deceased's name to announce the death or pay tribute to the deceased. It's made more complicated by modern society and communication.

I didn't know how to start the Obit thread without naming him.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: ranger1
Date: 05 Jun 13 - 06:11 PM

Helen, I don't think many of us in the US have heard of this man. I'm sorry that the first I knew of his existence was when I read about his death.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 05 Jun 13 - 06:23 PM

ranger1,

I understand.

I think that to a large proportion of Australians he is a legend. I know that Yothu Yindi's music did reach international awareness, but probably to a limited audience.

So thank you for coming to this thread and learning more about him.

Also, if you look at pictures of his face, there is wisdom and a deep understanding of the human race written there.

On a musical basis alone, the band's work is outstanding as a fusion of music from indigenous and non-indigenous cultures. The philosophy of him and the band is a cultural and community fusion, and a turning point in Australian history, I think.

As Sandra posted, Tracee Hutchison said in her article:

"There'd been others, notably, before him - the Warumpi Band, No Fixed Address, Coloured Stone - but none had crossed the great divide."

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 05 Jun 13 - 10:51 PM

Helen - the ABC & others just use surnames, tho a lot of obits & tributes use both his names.

here's a tribute from the Koori Mail - using his qualification as his title.

Ranger1 - definition of Koori


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 06 Jun 13 - 06:33 PM

Thanks Sandra for the link on the definition of Koori (which I didn't realise originated with the Awabakal people here in Newcastle, and further north in NSW and down to Victoria). I did know that there are other words like Murri, which refer to a different region.

I stopped using the term Aboriginal some years ago because I was told that some people object to the word used by white colonials, and I never refer to a person as an Aborigine because of the very negative way it has been used in our history. I was also told that Koori is specific to a region and therefore does not account for everyone. I started using the word "indigenous" out of respect but I now find that there are valid reasons why this is not acceptable.

I found this article which discusses the terms in brief:

How to name Aboriginal people?

It's a complicated issue. In this article there seems to be a preference by some people for using the term Aboriginal to describe people etc.

Basically I want to show respect for the people who lived here before white colonisation, and who have been given, and still are being given, a raw deal by us over the centuries.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 Jun 13 - 07:06 PM

Helen - the ABC & others just use surnames, tho a lot of obits & tributes use both his names.

should have been

Helen - the ABC & others just use Mr & surname, tho a lot of obits & tributes use both personal name & family name.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 06 Jun 13 - 07:45 PM

I looked at the link you posted above from Koori Mail and he was referred to as Dr Yunupingu, so that helps. I never realised that it was ok to use the surname and avoid the forename. Thanks for that information.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 02:44 PM

If you are in Oz, the State Memorial Service: Dr Yunupingu will be on ABC-News24 at 11.30am and also on NITV (National Indigenous TV) at the same time.

If you are not in Oz, maybe you will be able to view it via the ABC website.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Janie
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 04:39 PM

Helen and Sandra,

I thank you for sharing this obit thread and all the links. I know virtually nothing about Australia, and certainly nothing about the aboriginal and indigenous cultures. Have been reading the links and following other links that appear in the process. Through you, Yunupingu has opened the door to a new world for me.

Rest in peace.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Andrez
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 07:05 PM

Hi Helen,

I knew the memorial service was on today but wasnt aware it was being broadcast. I was working in the NT when Treaty was released and recall seeing the band performing in Darwin around that time. I'll see if I can get the channel up.

Re the reference to lack of Oz mudcatters input to this thread maybe people might like to make a contribution and say what they are doing or have been doing to contribute to reconciliation and self determination since Treaty first came out?

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 07:15 PM

Hi Janie & Andrez,

Thanks for looking in on the thread.

I forgot to post a link to the TV channel:


ABC News24

There is an option to view online, but I'm not sure whether it will be at the same time as the programme is airing or whether it will be uploaded later.

Andrez, I always feel like I'm not doing much for reconciliation, but I cried like a baby when the national apology was broadcast, and I try to learn more about Aboriginal culture, and keep up to date with issues, and on a personal level I hope I treat everyone with respect, regardless of their background.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Bugsy
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 08:30 PM

Sad news this. Could one of the tech boffins please remove Mr Yunupingu's given name from the thread title in repect for his family and his people.

Thank you
\
Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Andrez
Date: 29 Jun 13 - 09:38 PM

Thanks for that link Helen that makes it a lot easier. All set up and waiting now.

I went to the AAL in Victoria to hear the apology to make the time significant being surrounded by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. It was a pretty special time. Whilst i'm reluctant to go into specifics, earlier this year I did some paid/unpaid work for a major NGO developing a Family/Early Childhood Centre in the NorthWest of Oz. I'm currently developing an Issues paper on partnerships between Aboriginal and non-Aoriginal organisations in the Vic Community services sector.

This morning I just finished reading a book by Stephen Hawkes: The Australian review is at this link: A Town is Born .

It gives us some sense of progress from the dim dark days of the past. Despite how bad things still are in many respects at least we have moved on from that! Still its no reason to sit back on our laurels. It doesn't matter how small it is every little contribution even if its just a matter of self awareness helps in the long run.

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 30 Jun 13 - 06:08 AM

Bugsy, I sent a PM to Joe.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman Mandawuy Yunupingu
From: Helen
Date: 30 Jun 13 - 03:59 PM

Thanks Sandra. I was just about to do that.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman, Mr. Yunupingu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Jun 13 - 04:25 PM

Hope I did it right.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman, Mr. Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 01 Jul 13 - 10:59 AM

perfect, as always, Joe!


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman, Mr. Yunupingu
From: Bugsy
Date: 01 Jul 13 - 07:46 PM

Thank you Joe, and Sandra.

CHeers

Bugsy


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Subject: RE: ABC TV tonight - Australian Story
From: Helen
Date: 07 Jul 13 - 04:04 PM

Australian Story: The Music Lesson

    8pm - 8.32pm
    ABC1
    Tonight


Singer Jessica Mauboy introduces this updated program on the life of Yothu Yindi frontman Mr Yunupingu.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Yothu Yindi frontman, Mr. Yunupingu
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 07 Jul 13 - 10:37 PM

thanks for that, Helen


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