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Lyr Add: John Mitchell (from McNulty Family)

Jim Dixon 14 Jul 13 - 07:20 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Jul 13 - 07:41 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Jul 13 - 08:09 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHN MITCHELL (from McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Jul 13 - 07:20 PM

You can hear this recording at The Internet Archive; it is item #31 on the menu. Here is my transcription:


JOHN MITCHELL
As recorded by The McNulty Family, Decca (USA) 12217B, 4-May-1939.

I am a true-born Irishman; John Mitchell is my name.
To free my own brave countrymen, from Merrytown I came.
I struggled hard both night and day to free my native land,
For which I was transported unto Van Diemen's Land.

When I first joined my countrymen, it was in forty-two,
And then what followed after, I will quickly tell to you.
I raised the standard of Repeal and gloried in the deed,
And I vowed to heaven I never would rest till Ireland would be free.

While here in prison close confined awaiting my trial day,
My loving wife she came to me and thus to me did say:
"O Johnny boy, cheer up your heart, and daunted do not be,
For it's better to die for Ireland's rights than live in slavery."

When I received my sentence, in irons I was bound,
Where hundreds of my countrymen assembled all around.
My liberty was offered me if I'd forsake their cause,
But I'd rather die a thousand deaths than forsake my Irish boys.

Farewell, my wife and children dear; in heaven I'll wait for you.
Farewell, all true-born Irishmen; farewell, my country, too.
There's one request I'd ask of you when liberty you regain:
Remember poor John Mitchell who wore a convict's chain.

"O Johnny boy, cheer up your heart, and daunted do not be,
For it's better to die for Ireland's rights than live in slavery."


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHN MITCHELL
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Jul 13 - 07:41 PM

From Irish Song Book, No. 1 (New York: Wehman Bros., 1909), page 106. I have boldfaced the words that are different from the above transcription.


JOHN MITCHELL

I am a true-born Irishman; John Mitchell is my name.
To free my own brave countrymen from Merrytown I came.
I struggled hard both night and day to free my native land,
For which I was transported, as you may understand.

When I first joined my countrymen, it was in '42,
And then what followed after I'll quickly tell to you:
I raised the standard of "Repeal," and gloried in the deed,
And I vowed to heaven I'd never rest until Erin it was freed.

While here in prison close confined, waiting for my trial day,
My loving wife she came to me and these words to me did say:
"Oh, John, my dear, cheer up your heart, and daunted do not be,
For it's better to die for Erin's rights than to live in slavery."

When I received my sentence, 'twas on a foreign ground,
Where hundreds of my comrades assembled all around.
My liberty was offered me if there I would forsake their cause,
But I'd rather die ten thousand deaths than forsake my Irish boys!

Farewell, my true-born Irishmen; farewell, my country, too,
But to leave my poor babes behind, it grieves me worse than all.

There is one request I ask of you, when your liberty you gain:
Remember John Mitchell far away, though a convict bound in chains.


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHN MITCHELL
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Jul 13 - 08:09 PM

From The Flying Cloud: And 150 Other Old Time Poems and Ballads by M. C. Dean (Virginia, MN: M. C. Dean, 1922), page 36:


JOHN MITCHELL

I am a true bred Irishman; John Mitchell is my name.
When first to join my country's cause, from Tierney town I came.
I struggled hard both night and day to free my native land,
For which I was transported, as you may understand.

When first I joined my countrymen it was in '42,
And then what followed after I'll quickly tell to you:
I raised the Standard of Repeal and gloried in the deed,
And I swore that I would never rest until Ireland was freed.

While here in prison close confined, waiting my trial day,
My darling wife came to me and these words to me did say:
"Cheer up, cheer up, my dearest John, and daunted do not be,
For it's better to die for Erin's rights than to live in slavery."

When I received my sentence 'twas on a foreign ground,
Where hundreds of my countrymen assembled all around.
My liberty was offered me if I would forsake their cause,
But I'd rather die ten thousand deaths than forsake my Irish boys.

Farewell, my true born Irishmen; farewell, my country too,
But to leave my wife and babes behind it's almost more than I can do.
There is one request I ask of you when your liberty you gain:
Remember John Mitchell far away, though a convict bound in chains.


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