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BS: UK Scam - I presume

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Jim Carroll 12 Aug 13 - 05:34 AM
Roger the Skiffler 12 Aug 13 - 05:50 AM
GUEST,Grishka 12 Aug 13 - 08:09 AM
GUEST 12 Aug 13 - 08:35 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Aug 13 - 02:34 PM
GUEST,Eliza 12 Aug 13 - 04:43 PM
Georgiansilver 12 Aug 13 - 05:17 PM
GUEST,Allan Conn 12 Aug 13 - 05:53 PM
TheSnail 12 Aug 13 - 05:55 PM
Jim Carroll 13 Aug 13 - 04:09 AM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 13 Aug 13 - 04:43 AM
Dave the Gnome 13 Aug 13 - 05:10 AM
GUEST,Triplane 13 Aug 13 - 05:15 AM
Dave the Gnome 13 Aug 13 - 08:16 AM
GUEST,triplane 13 Aug 13 - 10:12 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Aug 13 - 12:20 PM
GUEST,Eliza 13 Aug 13 - 12:38 PM
Mrrzy 13 Aug 13 - 06:04 PM
GUEST,Eliza 13 Aug 13 - 06:39 PM
Jim Carroll 14 Aug 13 - 04:01 AM
MartinRyan 14 Aug 13 - 04:04 AM
treewind 14 Aug 13 - 05:11 AM
MGM·Lion 14 Aug 13 - 05:32 AM
GUEST,Eliza 14 Aug 13 - 10:58 AM
Jim Carroll 14 Aug 13 - 11:06 AM
MartinRyan 14 Aug 13 - 11:11 AM
Llanfair 14 Aug 13 - 03:41 PM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 14 Aug 13 - 09:02 PM
redhorse 15 Aug 13 - 03:43 AM
treewind 15 Aug 13 - 01:29 PM
treewind 15 Aug 13 - 01:36 PM
GUEST,Eliza 15 Aug 13 - 02:07 PM
treewind 16 Aug 13 - 06:31 AM
Roger the Skiffler 16 Aug 13 - 09:08 AM

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Subject: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 05:34 AM

I assume this is a scam - please pass on the information to a likely victim.
I found this in my Spam box this morning from HM Revenue and Customs - note it was addressed to Dear Applicant - no name and no website address.
It was accompanied by a form which included a request for my banking details - account and pin number, etc.
As we are British citizens living in the Irish Republic we thought it odd that, not paying British tax we couldn't understand why we should be entitled to a refund.   
If I am widely wrong - red faces all round, if not - "be careful out there, d'you hear.
Jim Carroll

Dear Applicant:
Following an upgrade of our computer systems and review of our records we have investigated your payments and latest tax returns over the last seven years
our calculations show you have made over payments of GBP 323.56
Due to the high volume of refunds due you must complete the online application, the telephone help line is unable to assist with this application.
In order to process your refund you will need to complete the attached application form.
Your refund may take up to 3 weeks to process please make sure you complete the form correctly.

To access your tax refund, please follow the steps below:

    - download the Tax Refund Form attached to this email
    - open it in a browser
    - follow the instructions on your screen

Regards,
HM Revenue & Customs


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 05:50 AM

NO genuine authority would ask for your PIN number, never needed to ADD money to your account. HMRC will always write to you ( and if THEY owe you money it is months before they do. If you owe THEM, however...)

RtS


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Grishka
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 08:09 AM

And little girls should never go with strange men ...


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 08:35 AM

These scams have been going on for years. HRMC used to have a statement on their home page saying that they NEVER send emails advising refunds.
For some reason they have now revamped their site to put that statement two clicks down.

QUOTE

Remember:

    HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) will never send notifications of a tax rebate by email, or ask you to disclose personal or payment information by email.
    To be completely safe from phishers, do not select links in emails. If in doubt, close your browser, reopen it, and type the web address for the site you want to visit directly into the address bar.



How to report HMRC related phishing/bogus emails

If you have received a HMRC related phishing/bogus email, please forward it to phishing@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk and then delete it.

/QUOTE


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 02:34 PM

Common email scam here in Canada and U. S. as well.
Often phrased that they can't pay some bill until I give them full information, etc., or deposit to my account....,
Disguised with an approximation of the website of a bank, Ebay, Amazon or similar.

No reliable business, bank or government ever asks for critical information in this way.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 04:43 PM

It's essential never ever to give any type of Banking, Tax, ID details etc over the phone or the Internet. You can always demand a printed letter by Post, or contact your own Banking branch, Tax Office etc yourself to check if they actually did initiate contact. On the phone, the scammers can keep their line to you open, so when you ring your bank back, it's really the scammers you end up talking to. I've had calls purporting to be from Microsoft, wanting me to allow them into my computer to 'check a fault' (as if!). Just refuse to entertain any kind of unsolicited approaches, and trust only business activity you've initiated yourself.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 05:17 PM

Have to inform you that all such scams come from Nigeria... and if you are canny... you can spot them a mile off!


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Allan Conn
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 05:53 PM

"I've had calls purporting to be from Microsoft, wanting me to allow them into my computer to 'check a fault' (as if!)."

Yeagh I've had the fault on your PC one a few times. First time it happened I had crossed wires. It was an Indian voice saying "I am phoning you about Windows" and I thought he was trying to sell double glazing. Was quite funny. Not funny anymore. I just tell them they are thieving bastards.

Now what about that nice solicitor in Nigeria dealing with my unknown relatives estate???


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: TheSnail
Date: 12 Aug 13 - 05:55 PM

NEVER open the attachments on things like this and if you have, run a virus scan.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 04:09 AM

Thanks for all this - never come across it before, must have led a very sheltered life.
I'm aware of the on-going Nigerian scams, but I don't believe an "Indian voice" has any particular significance. Re-adjusting my Sky Box, inquiries about Vodafone, comupter problem inquiries and a whole host of other calls - I have made in the past have often been re-routed to 'faraway places with strange-sounding names' at one time or another - seems the nature of modern business practices since we've all been 'Thatcherised'
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 04:43 AM

No problem when you phone them Jim, but when they phone you tell them nothing!

Seriously mate!

Don T.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 05:10 AM

If you have the time and inclination you can do other people a favour by keeping the phone scammers on the line for as long as possible. While they are talking to you they are not calling anyone else. My personal record is 7 minutes 16 seconds before the guy on the other end realised I was taking the piss.

Cheers

DtG


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Triplane
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 05:15 AM

I just got caught by one when renewing my driving licence in a hurry
Its appearance is that u are filling out a driving licence form and they will send it to DVLC after checking it ... they dont and charge u £20 for the privilege. the site says they have no connection to DVLC on it but i still fell for it.
Beware Driving licence renewal


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 08:16 AM

That is not a scam, Triplane - Just a business. From the front page of link you give -

Our website helps you with all the administration around applying for, renewing or exchanging your drivers licence online. We check the accuracy of the information you enter before the application is sent to the DVLA for processing, ensuring there are no mistakes that could delay your licence application. We charge a one-time application fee of £29.99 for our service.

Please note, our service is independent of the DVLA-run site where you can also apply for, renew and exchange your license for free. If you choose to click below you will be redirected to the DVLA website, but will no longer be able to take advantage of our services.


So you did not fall for a scam, just paid for the service they provide quite openly. Don't think I would use it myself but I have paid extra at, for instance, the post office to renew my passport application. It is just a question of paying for the time you save.

Cheers

DtG


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,triplane
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 10:12 AM

I agree Dave , its case of caveat emptor , I thought just as you do but they say they will send a completed copy to you and they didn't in my case .
I have spoken to my bank fraud people and they say they are in breach of contract and they will try to get me a refund on that basis.
Once you actually use the DVLC website and complete the forms it has the same corrective links as this one so it is a charge for nothing and is of no advantage.
The bank people tell me there is a similar scam in the passport system ,both scams are dangerous from the personal detail point of view. . Its not till the documentation promised does not arrive and u use the dvla site to get your renewal that you twig that u have paid for nothing .How
many of us are up to speed on renewing licences and passports?


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 12:20 PM

Not all these scams are Nigerian.
Never open an email of this kind.
Go to the website on your services, and report or email a copy.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 12:38 PM

Bit of Thread Drift, but I had quite a disturbing experience only two days ago. My inbox had an email headed 'Sad News About John Smith' (not the real name, he's the husband of a friend) and it was sent from his real email address. When I opened it, it was a letter to the effect that 'John' was stranded in Indonesia and had been robbed. Neither The British Embassy nor the local Police could help and would I send $3000 immediately? This chap is very old and would never be in Indonesia. Obviously a scam. But however did the scammer get the couple's email address from my Contacts List? Or how did they get MY email address from THEIR list? Either way, there's been a breach of security. The heading of the message was upsetting as I thought he had died. Any ideas how they'd got both our addresses and knew we contacted eachother?


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 06:04 PM

HE got hacked. That happened to me too, and our Ivorian friends were really upset at Mom for sending me overseas without enough money... almost everyone in my email address book got the same email about me. No idea where the money would have gone had anyone sent any. Everybody else instantly knew it was a scam.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 13 Aug 13 - 06:39 PM

Sounds like the same scenario, Mrrzy. But how exactly does one get 'hacked'? I thought one's email account is safe from 'invaders'.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 04:01 AM

"No problem when you phone them Jim, but when they phone you tell them nothing!"
Thanks Don, I never do.
Don't know about the UK but we average around half-a-dozen 'cold-calls' a day in Ireland, usually trying to sell you telephone companies and usually when you are busy and often at mealtimes.
Take your point about not all scams being Nigerian Q
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 04:04 AM

Jim

You know you can put your number on a register to protect it from cold calls, in Ireland? Works pretty well in my experience - though I have occasionally had to resort to blowing a Boy Scout whistle down the line!

Regards


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: treewind
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 05:11 AM

Obviously if an email purports to come from your bank and there's a link to a foreign domain it's a good clue that it's not genuine.
However it's not helpful to anyone to characterise scams as originating only or mostly from any particular country. A scam is a scam, whether it's being done by your next door neighbour or someone 12000 miles away.

As for that Sky news story, it tells me a lot about Sky News's politics but nothing else meaningful.

I'm surprised at the driving license application assistance site - admittedly my only experience of the real DVLC site is for renewing my vehicle license, but it strikes me as one of the best designed and easiest to use sites around and the last place I'd need help.

I've had many emails of the genre "Help! I've been mugged in [foreign country]" typically from hotmail and yahoo email users who have had their accounts hacked. They look more credible than some because the scammers send to everyone in the account holder's address book, hence these emails invariably seem to come from someone you know.

How do their accounts get hacked?
Here's one clue: "More than 90 percent of all passwords appear on a list of the top 1,000 choices. When that list is extended to include the 10,000 most common passwords, the list represents 99.8 percent of all user passwords." source: http://www.livescience.com/34164-what-are-the-most-common-passwords.html

There's lots of other ways too, such as trojans installing keylogging software, installed by a variety of methods.

Nothing is totally secure, but a little common sense in your internet use helps a lot.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 05:32 AM

...it's not helpful to anyone to characterise scams as originating only or mostly from any particular country. A scam is a scam, whether it's being done by your next door neighbour or someone 12000 miles away.
As for that Sky news story, it tells me a lot about Sky News's politics but nothing else meaningful.


Tu quoque could be the response to above poster. Tells reams about the PC·fatuity of his own politics...!

~M~

_____________________________________
That was just troll banter, Michael. All gone now. --mudelf


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 10:58 AM

I'm very interested by what you say, treewind, about passwords. My email account has a very complex password. I'm quite proud of it as it was certified as 'Very Strong'. I was told by my savvy neighbour to use lower and upper case letters mixed in with random numbers. So I imagine it's my friends whose account was hacked; maybe their password is rather easy to guess. It's a bit simplistic IMO to say most scams originate in Nigeria. As you say, they could be from anywhere on the planet. We just have to be vigilant and not give any details away. My friend who's a volunteer for AgeUK is always telling the elderly callers not to be bamboozled like this.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 11:06 AM

"You know you can put your number on a register to protect it from cold calls, in Ireland?"
I didn't Martin - thanks.
Something else to talk about over a pint?
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 11:11 AM

Jim
For the basic details:
Click here

Details depend on your service supplier.

Regards
p.s. Without prejudice to the pint!


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Llanfair
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 03:41 PM

I give short shrift to the ones who can't pronounce my name. I get them to repeat their message a couple of times, then tell them I've no PPI's outstanding, haven't had an accident, and don't use a credit card.

Curmudgeonly?   Oh yes!!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 14 Aug 13 - 09:02 PM

I just say, "Please be aware that I am signed up to the Telephone Preference Service and this call is being recorded for evidential purposes."

Usually followed instantly by a click and the dial tone!

Don T.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: redhorse
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 03:43 AM

"I'm surprised at the driving license application assistance site - admittedly my only experience of the real DVLC site is for renewing my vehicle license, but it strikes me as one of the best designed and easiest to use sites around and the last place I'd need help."

While it's not strictly a scam, it comes close.
These sites (and they also exist for passport applications) pay Google so as to ensure that when you Google "Driving Licence application" their site comes out higher up the page than the official government site. A small percentage of punters are sufficiently misled to think they are the official site, and part with money.

While they do not claim to be the government site (that would be illegal), their business model is based on the careless mistaking them for what they are not.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: treewind
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 01:29 PM

"their business model is based on the careless mistaking them for what they are not."

Or on instilling fear that terrible things will happen if they get anything wrong when filling the forms.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: treewind
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 01:36 PM

Eliza: "My email account has a very complex password"
Yes, it's not your account that was hacked, but your friend's account.

So having a strong password won't prevent you from getting those emails, but at least it will help to prevent your account from being used to send them, and protect you from the other loss-of-privacy issues that might result from someone having access to all your email.

And yes, maybe your friend needs to set a better password.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 15 Aug 13 - 02:07 PM

Thank you treewind. I haven't as yet told them about the strange email in their name, but as it's probably their account that's been hacked, I'll alert them and suggest they choose a 'stronger' password.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: treewind
Date: 16 Aug 13 - 06:31 AM

"I haven't as yet told them"
Do it.
In general, if you get an email like that (specifically the cry for help from someone you know "in trouble in a foreign country") it's a good idea to send them an email (or other communication) immediately advising them to change their password. To a stronger password if it wasn't a good one before, but most important, just change it as soon as possible because until they've changed it the scammers can continue to access and abuse their account.
Until somebody tells them, they may not know it's happened.

I've heard of people closing their account after events like that. I think that's unnecessary unless there's a further reason for doing so - once you've changed your password the scammers have no access to your account any more, unless they got it by snooping on your communications with a packet sniffer or key logging software, in which case nothing is safe until you've fixed THAT problem with virus and malware scans etc.

There's another kind of email that does the rounds from time to time: that's the "tell everybody you know" style of warning about some kind of virus or scam. You can usually look them up on snopes.com and confirm that it's a hoax, and in that case your sender hasn't been hacked, they are just gullible. Nobody needs to change their passwords for that, but if I get one I usually send them a reply (and to all the other recipients if known) with a link to the snopes.com entry explaining that it's a hoax, and recommending them to check next time they get an email like that.

Also you can some times get general spam that's apparently come from someone you know (or even from yourself). That's simply had the headers forged and doesn't mean your friend's account has been hacked. They don't need to take any action, and your only solution is better spam filtering.


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Subject: RE: BS: UK Scam - I presume
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 16 Aug 13 - 09:08 AM

I usually delete anything like a chain letter. If it is anything worth sharing I never forward the original message, just cut and paste. I do the same when sharing any funnies sent to me, especially if the (known) sender is forwarding something from an unknown (to me) source. I never open any with an attachment unless I'm sure of the sender.

RtS


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