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Lyr Add: Pullman Porter songs & info

Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Aug 13 - 11:51 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Aug 13 - 01:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Aug 13 - 01:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Aug 13 - 08:41 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Aug 13 - 08:54 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Aug 13 - 12:06 AM
Jim Dixon 25 Aug 13 - 12:16 AM
Jim Dixon 25 Aug 13 - 10:23 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Aug 13 - 01:47 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Aug 13 - 02:14 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Aug 13 - 03:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Aug 13 - 04:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Aug 13 - 07:39 PM
Joe Offer 26 Aug 13 - 03:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Aug 13 - 04:41 PM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 13 - 02:41 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 13 - 04:00 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 13 - 04:46 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 13 - 08:25 PM
Jim Dixon 31 Aug 13 - 08:49 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 13 - 09:25 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Sep 13 - 11:47 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 13 - 04:44 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Sep 13 - 07:07 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: PULLMAN PORTER MAN (Murphy/Behim)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Aug 13 - 11:51 AM

Lyr. Add: PULLMAN PORTER MAN
Lyrics Stanley Murphy, music Arthur E. Behim, 1911

1. On the Twentieth Century Limited train
Has a Porter man named Daniel Lane
Who led a double life.
At each end he had a wife.
He'd bid goodbye to number one,
Saying, "Goodness, how I'll miss you, hon!"
Then go to number two
And swear that he'd been true.
His wife, out in Chicago, sat a-singing all day long,
While in New York his other wife
Would sing the same old song.

CHORUS: He's my Dan,
My Pullman porter man!
He's the high Mogul and Czar
Of a Pullman palace car.
'Long the line, just see his buttons shine!
I'm swelled all up because I know he's mine.
From his trips he brings home all his tips.
He just lays down his grips
And puckers up his lips.
In the evenin' he says, "Good night, Chic."
In the mornin', "How de-do, N. Y."
He's some "fast man," my Pullman Porter Dan."

2. At Buffalo, they had a wreck
And poor Dan nearly broke his neck.
The news his wives both heard,
And thought that he was dead.
They both packed up and jumped on trains
To view their loved one's last remains.
They reached his side next day
While in a trance he lay.
The doctor said, "Who is this man? now please identify."
Then both his wives looked down at Dan and both began to cry. CHORUS


Brings back memories of the glorious Pullman days.
The fireman and the engineer, we believed as children, also had wives at each end of the run.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE TOURISTS IN A PULLMAN CAR (G Bowron)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Aug 13 - 01:06 PM

THE TOURISTS IN A PULLMAN CAR
Words and music by George Bowron

1
Over the grassy plains we swiftly wheel along
No thought of care would ever dare to mar our happy song
The car to ourselves, the time it seems to fly away
Without a fear of any interruption by the way
Oh- what joy to be a tourist
And travel near and far-
While we are riding in a Pullman palace,
in a Pullman palace car.
2
Here in the wildest districts of our wondrous land
The rocky cañons are so rude, so fresh from nature's hand-
The trees of the east we miss for here we see- but few
And of the distant mountains we get a bird's eye view
We tear across the country of the red man-
From whence he has gone afar-
While we are riding in a Pullman palace,
in a Pullman palace car.

Sung buy the "John P. Smith's Tourists."
Spear & Dehnhoff, New York Hotel

From American Memory, sheet music.

By 1880, the American tourist was a growing group; those who could afford it crossing the continent in luxury in Pullman cars (the first in 1867).

The Pullman porter was one of the first steps of the Black man into jobs not demanding physical labor.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter Man (Murphy/Bohim)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Aug 13 - 01:23 PM

From the first, George Pullman formed his porters from Black men, giving them a simple uniform with which White middle class travelers would be comfortable, yet give them a taste of luxury.
The last served in the 1960s, marking almost one hundred years of the Pullman porter.

In 1925, The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters was formed.
The history of the Pullman porter can be found in the Pullman Porter Museum Gallery, Chicago; founded in 1995.

The Pullman porters were usually addressed as "George," from the first name of George Pullman.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PULLMAN PORTERS PARADE (May/Abrahams)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Aug 13 - 08:41 PM

PULLMAN PORTERS PARADE
Irving Berlin; as Reg. G. May and Maurice Abrahams, 1913

Here they come down the street,-
See them comin',
Hear the drums, how they beat,
Hear the drummin' oh, my one little Hon',
Better run to the fun,
They're parading, hear the yell from the boys!
Honey listen, can't you tell by the noise,
That we're missing all the fun?
Come and see the big parade,-
My honey

Chorus-
Just see those Pullman porters,
Dolled up with perfumed waters,
Bought by their dimes and quarters;
Here they come, here they come, here they come,
Just see those starched-up collars,
Hear how that captain hollers,
Keep time--- keep time---
It's worth a thousand dollars,
To see those tip collectors,
Those upper-berth inspectors,
Those Pullman porters on parade.

Look at flat-footed Mose,
See him juggling his hat as he goes,
See the struggling of bow-legged Joe,
Don't he go rather slow?
Watch him stepping on the ground like a hen!
All in clover, see those round-shouldered men,-
Stoopin' over, oh my!
Hon, that's what I call some parade,-
My honey

Chorus-

The first Irving Berlin song sung by Al Jolson.
(Ren. G. May = Germany)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter Man (Murphy/Bohim)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Aug 13 - 08:54 PM

The above from American Memory, Historical American Sheet Music.

George Pullman hired former slaves, rightly knowing that they would have the proper training.
The porters worked 400 hours a month, or 11,000 miles. They paid for their meals, uniforms, shoe polish for the passengers' shoes, and were liable for any items stolen. On overnight trips, they seldom got more than 3-4 hours sleep, which was deducted from their pay. They prepared the Pullman car on their own time. There was little job security.

At this time, many job involving tips were unpaid, or required a payment from the "employee" to the company. Bell captains at better resorts and hotels sometimes paid thousands to the institution in order to hold their position.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY PULLMAN PORTER MAN (from E Robinson)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 12:06 AM

As long as we're collecting songs about Pullman porters, we might as well have this blues song. I listened to it on Spotify; it's from the Document Records album "Elzadie Robinson Vol. 2 1928-1929." The sound quality is very poor, and I found several phrases to be unintelligible, and a few others are doubtful.


MY PULLMAN PORTER MAN
As sung by Elzadie Robinson, 1929.

I heard a lot of rumbling(?) on ... that I. C. train. (2x)
God(?), that makes me feel like my man's coming back again.

My man's a Pullman porter out on(?) the I. C. line. (2x)
He can put you to sleep, wake you up on time.

When he comes home, he goes right in the hay. (2x)
Because, sweet mama, it's about the break of day.

He'll load(?) your wheels, honey, …. (2x)
He can fix it so your man can't turn it around.

He rides first on top, then from side to side. (2x)
If he loads your baggage, you'll sure be satisfied.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PULLMAN PORTER (Robert W Service)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 12:16 AM

Here's a poem, copied from http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175996:

PULLMAN PORTER
Robert W. Service

The porter in the Pullman car
Was charming, as they sometimes are.
He scanned my baggage tags: "Are you
The man who wrote of Lady Lou?"
When I said "yes" he made a fuss —
Oh, he was most assiduous;
And I was pleased to think that he
Enjoyed my brand of poetry.

He was forever at my call,
So when we got to Montreal
And he had brushed me off, I said:
"I'm glad my poems you have read,
I feel quite flattered, I confess,
And if you give me your address
I'll send you (autographed, of course)
One of my little books of verse."

He smiled — his teeth were white as milk;
He spoke — his voice was soft as silk.
I recognized, despite his skin,
The perfect gentleman within.
Then courteously he made reply:
"I thank you kindly, Sir, but I
With many other cherished tome
Have all your books of verse at home.

"When I was quite a little boy
I used to savour them with joy;
And now my daughter, aged three,
Can tell the tale of Sam McGee;
While Tom, my son, that's only two,
Has heard the yarn of Dan McGrew ....
Don't think your stuff I'm not applaudin' —
My taste is Eliot and Auden."

So as we gravely bade adieu
I felt quite snubbed — and so would you.
And yet I shook him by the hand,
Impressed that he could understand
The works of those two tops I mention,
So far beyond my comprehension —
A humble bard of boys and barmen,
Disdained, alas! by Pullman carmen.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter Man (Murphy/Behim)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 10:23 AM

There is a lot of information about Pullman-related music at the web site of the Pullman State Historic Site (Chicago), including links to sheet music images and MIDI files.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HOLLYHOCK (E F Cogley/W E Bock)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 01:47 PM

HOLLYHOCK
Words Ed F. Cogley, Music Wm. E. Bock, c. 1904

A Pullman "bo" from the B and O
Dropped down on bended knee,
And kneeling there he did declare
His love to Mandy Lee,-
For Mandy had a rich old dad
Who just last week had died,
And she was wise, said, "Man, arise,"
And then to him replied-

Chorus-
"Hollyhock, hollyhock, cut out all that jolly talk,
Better change your tack
And a-back! back!
You're surely drifting on a rock,
tho' you love me honey,
All you want is ma good money,
And I'll gib you a hunch,
You can't hand me no bunch of hollyhock."

The coon then said, "Mandy, on de dead,
You surely 'cuse me wrong,
Don't think that I would even try
With your coin to get "strong"-
Now you've got wealth, and I've got health,
What need we care for money?"
He felt a draft, he heard a laugh,
And these words through the door-

Chorus-

M. Widmark and Sons, New York

American Memory, African American Sheet Music


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter Man (Murphy/Behim)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 02:14 PM

The Service poem reminded me of a Pullman porter on the AT&SF (late 1930s), who was reading a book in his spare minutes. He remained ever watchful of the passengers in the car, leaning on the wall at one end and glancing up at short intervals.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PULLMAN PORTER BLUES (Ulrich/Hamilton)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 03:08 PM

PULLMAN PORTER BLUES
Clifford Ulrich, Burton Hamilton, 1921
A Light Brown Blues

1
I feel oh, so blue
I really don't know what to do
I got a brand new job, a tip collector,
It's some job, a car protector,
Since I left my home and started on the railroad to roam,
I get nothing but abuse,
So tell me what's the use.

Chorus 1
It's "Pullman porter, draft on my feet."
It's "Pullman porter, turn on the heat."
It's "Pullman porter, all live-long day,
"Pullman porter, "Bring me water," that's all they say,
It's "Pullman porter, make up my berth,"
It's "Pullman porter, no place on earth,"
"Oh, Pullman porter, won't you shine my shoes"
I got the Pullman Porter Blues.


Chorus 2
It's "Pullman porter, turn on the light,"
It's "Pullman porter, get me a bite,"
It's Pullman porter, all the whole night thru,
It seems to be I'm always wrong whatever I do
It's Pullman porter, what town are we at?"
It's Pullman porter, brush off my hat,"
"Now look here Porter, someone stole my booze,"
I got the Pullman Porter Blues.

2
Believe me when I say,
I'm on the go the live-long day
I try to earn my dough in Pullman service,
I'm not slow, but I'm so nervous,
When night time comes around and in the car there's not a sound,
Just as I get to my bed,
Then the bell rings over my head.

www.pdmusic.org/blues/21ppb.txt


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Subject: Lyr Add: HEY PORTER (Johnny Cash)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 04:39 PM

HEY PORTER
John R. Cash

Hey, Porter, hey, Porter, would you tell me the time
How much longer will it be 'til we cross the Mason-Dixon Line
When we hit Dixie would you tell that engineer to ring his bell
And ask everybody that ain't asleep to stand right up and yell

Hey, Porter, hey Porter, what time did you say
How much longer will it be 'til I can see the light of day
When we hit Dixie would you tell that engineer to slow it down
Better still just stop the train 'cause I'd like to look around.

Hey, Porter, hey Porter, it's getting light outside
This old train is puffin' smoke and I have to strain my eyes
But ask that engineer if he would blow his whistle please
I smell frost on cotton leaves and I feel that southern breeze.

Hey Porter, hey Porter, get my bags for me
I need nobody to tell me now that we're in Tennessee
Go tell that engineer to make that lonesome whistle scream
We're gettin' close to home so take it easy on the steam.

Hey Porter, hey Porter please open up the door
When they stop this train, I'm gonna get off first 'cause I can't
wait no more
Tell that engineer I said thanks a lot and I didn't mind the fair
Gonna set my feet on southern soil and breathe that southern air.

Hey, Porter, hey Porter, would you tell me the time
How much longer will it be 'til we cross that Mason-Dixon Line
When we hit Dixie would you tell that engineer to ring his bell
And everybody that ain't asleep to stand right up and yell.

Warner/Chappell Music Inc.

www.lyricsfreak.com


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Subject: Lyr Add: RAILROAD PORTER BLUES (Sylvester Weaver)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Aug 13 - 07:39 PM

RAILROAD PORTER BLUES
Sylvester Weaver, 1927

Hear that bell ringin'? Keeps me 'wake all night long
Hear that bell ringin'? Keeps me 'wake all night long
Ain't no time for sleepin', something's always goin' on wrong.

Folks keep yellin', "Rastus, pull the window down, please"
Folks keep yellin', "Rastus, pull the window down, please"
"With that snow a-fallin', somebody's surely going to freeze"

Mmmmmmm, Hear how that whistle blows
Mmmmmmm, Hear how that whistle blows
It's blowing like it don't have to blow no more

Shinin' shoes 'til morning, got no place to lay my head
Shinin' shoes 'til morning, got no place to lay my head
When I get through slavin', Lord, I'm almost dead.

Babies start cryin', then they take me to be a nurse
Babies start cryin', then they take me to be a nurse
I gets almost drownded, then what could be worse?

Poor railroad porter hates to leave his wife at home
Poor railroad porter hates to leave his wife at home
'Cause she starts to cheatin' just as soon as he is gone.

Recorded with Walter Beasley on Okeh, 1927. "Rock Pile Blues" on B side.

The lyrics above, with the note "C position standard tuning," from-
http://weeniecampbell.com/wiki/index.php?title=Railroad_Porter_Blues


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 Aug 13 - 03:13 PM

Since we have such a variety of Pullman Porter songs posted, I changed the thread title. I'd like to be able to change the title to "Pullman Porter Songs & Info." I've briefly seen a lot of stuff about the Pullman company and its operations in Chicago, and I think it would be of interest. I don't know where to find that information now.
Can anybody tell us the story of the Pullman cars and the Pullman porters?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Aug 13 - 04:41 PM

Wiki has the bare bones history of George Pullman and the Pullman Porters; there are many interesting stories.

Recently published, "An Anthology of Respect, The Pullman Porter National Historic Registry," by Lyn Hughes, lists the names of the porters who worked for the company in its 101 years of operation.
The A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum in Chicago has an interesting website:
www.aphiliprandolphmuseum.com

WTTW, www.wttw.com, has an interesting article, "From Servitude to Civil Rights."
The Pullman Rail Car Company was the largest employer of Blacks in the country.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter songs & info
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 13 - 02:41 PM

George Mortimer Pullman (1831-1897) must have been a fascinating character. In many ways, he was very much like the other "robber barons" of the 19th century. He founded a company town within the city of Chicago - and of course he named it Pullman. Some of the architecture in the town is downright wonderful. And of course, George Pullman was central in the infamous 1894 Pullman strike, one of the best-known strikes in the history of the United States.

I don't know what to think of George Pullman. Working conditions and wages and benefits for Pullman porters and factory workers, were considerably better than those of other workers - but Pullman workers had to put up with having their lives controlled by George Pullman.

-Joe-


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PORTER IN A PULLMAN CAR (Warner/Bray)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 13 - 04:00 PM

You can see the sheet music either at the Library of Congress web site or at Pullman State Historic Site (Chicago). Click for an mp3 (piano part only).


THE PORTER IN A PULLMAN CAR
Words by Harry Warner; music by Will H. Bray
"As sung in the Tourists P.P.C."
Cincinnati: John Church & Co., ©1880.

1. When you sally forth for bus'ness or for pleasure,
On a journey by the evening train,
Just as soon as you get fairly on the platform,
Your duty is quite plain:
Speak kindly to the colored gen'man there,
Dressed in a suit of blue.
Fork out small change in plenty and you'll find
That he'll take care of you.

CHORUS: He'll rid you soon of all your trouble.
Your comforts and expenses double.
Ever pleasant, ever willing and obliging,
More particular if the tip is "thar!"
What a tiresome thing your trip would be without him.
SPOKEN: Don't you think so? 50 cents all around, please.
SUNG: The Porter in a Pullman car.

2. He is always just as neat and just as tidy
As you could wish to see,
And he never is the slightest out of temper,
Unless you make too free.
Remember he's the most important man
Upon the train by far.
Life's journey is a weary one without
The Porter in a Pullman car.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PULLMAN CAR (A Hudson/C J Miers)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 13 - 04:46 PM

You can see the sheet music for this song at the web site for The Library of Congress, The Levy Collection, or , and The Pullman State Historic Site. Click for an MP3.


PULLMAN CAR.
Words by Alfred Hudson; music by Charles J. Miers.
Philadelphia: Lee & Walker, ©1871.

1. Pray give me your attention.
Some facts to you I'll mention
About a dear, bewitching girl I met the other day.
'Twas in the hours of leisure,
While traveling just for pleasure,
She came walking through a Pullman car and looked so sweet and gay.

CHORUS: Riding in a Pullman car,
Whilst riding in a Pullman car,
A girl she passed me by,
And winked at me so sly,
Whilst riding in a Pullman car.
Whilst riding in a Pullman car,
Whilst riding in a Pullman car,
A girl she passed me by,
And winked at me so sly,
Riding in a Pullman car.

2. As I alone was sitting,
She through the car came flitting,
I watched her with enraptured gaze as she was tripping by;
My heart was gone completely.
Her eyes they beamed so sweetly.
I smiled at her, she smiled at me, and then she winked her eye.

3. At last we reached the station
Which was our destination.
I lost sight of that pretty girl who stole my heart away;
But soon I mean to find her,
And then I will remind her
About that small flirtation we had the other day.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DE PULLMAN PORTERS' BALL (Smith/Stromberg
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 13 - 08:25 PM

The sheet music for this song can be seen at: Baylor University, UCLA, The Levy Collection, or The Pullman State Historic SiteMP3MIDI.


Vocal and instrumental selections from
Weber & Field's new burlesque production
"Hoity-Toity":
DE PULLMAN PORTERS' BALL
Sung by Fritz Williams
Lyrics by Edgar Smith; music by John Stromberg
New York : M. Witmark, ©1901.

1. 'Twas a dream ob delight las' Saturday night at Abram Lincoln Hall,
When de cullud elite was shakin' dere feet at de Pullman porters' ball.
Dey was not out fo' cash, an' no common trash could mingle for love or cush.
Yer had to be de fust ob de upper crust to mingle wid dat push.

CHORUS: Oh! dem kings ob de railroad downed 'em all,
An' dat Newport soci'ty's got to crawl.
Ev'ry coon worth a milllion in de ragtime cotillion
At de Pullman porters' ball

2. All de wall ob de room was gaily festooned wid watermelon vine,
Dey polished de flo' for a week or mo' wid de fines' bacon rin';
Dere was all kin's o' grub an' wine by de tub an' music by Skidmore's band;
An' ev'ry dusky belle had a bouquet to smell, in her white lily hand.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PORTERS ON THE PULLMAN PALACE CARS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 31 Aug 13 - 08:49 PM

The sheet music for this song can be seen at The Library of Congress or The Pullman State Historic SiteMP3MIDI.


PORTERS ON THE PULLMAN PALACE CARS
Sung by Welby and Pearl
Words by Charles G. Amsden; music by George Phillips.
New York: C. H. Ditson & Co., ©1884.

1. We are two happy porters on the Pullman Palace cars,
But never still a moment, we're like little twinkling stars.
We smile at all the ladies, and they think we are so nice.
We're so polite that when we go, they sometimes pay us twice.

CHORUS: Oh, we are two happy porters on the Pullman Palace cars.
We're never still a moment, like little twinkling stars.

2. From St. Paul to Chicago, we are always on the go.
We travel day and night to please the passengers, you know.
Our suits cut to perfection, and the buttons nice to see,
Admired by charming ladies, oh, how happy we can be!


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Subject: Lyr Add: DAPPER DAN (Brown/Von Tilzer)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 13 - 09:25 AM

You can see the sheet music for this song at The Levy Collection:


DAPPER DAN (THE LADIES MAN FROM DIXIE LAND)
Words by Lew Brown, music by Albert Von Tilzer.
New York: Broadway Music Corporation, ©1911.
Featured with terrific success by Eddie Cantor in the "Midnight Rounders"

1. Dapper Dan was a Pullman porter man on a train that ran through Dixie.
Ev'ryone knew Dapper Dan,
Knew him for a ladies' man:
Never cared to settle down,
Had a girl in ev'ry town.
On the train the whole day long,
You'll hear him sing this song:

CHORUS 1: If I lose my gal in Tennessee,
That won't worry me,
'Cause I've got another honey lamb
Waitin' for me down in Alabam';
And if I lose my gal in Alabam',
I won't feel blue,
'Cause I got one in Georgia that I can march right to.
If I lose my gal in Georgia,
Bet that I won't pine,
'Cause I've got another mamma waiting,
Down in sunny Caroline.
Now I ain't handsome, I ain't sweet,
But I've got a brand of lovin' that can't be beat.
I'm the ladies' man,
Dapper Dan from Dixieland.

2. Dapper Dan was a very handy man on a train that ran through Dixie,
Made the beds and ev'rything.
All you had to do was ring.
If the train stopped anywhere,
There'd be some gal waiting there.
He'd say: "This is one of mine,
And there's others down the line."

CHORUS 2: If I lose my gal in Baltimore,
That won't make me sore,
'Cause I've got one who can fill the bill
Waitin' for me down in Louisville;
And if I lose my gal in Louisville,
I'll never fret,
'Cause I've got one in Mobile that I can go and get.
If I lose my gal in Mobile,
Funny as it seems,
There's another lovin' sweetie waiting,
Down in sunny New Orleans.
I won't let no gal run my life,
'Cause if I lose them all, I still got my wife.
I'm the ladies' man, Dapper Dan from Dixieland.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Pullman Porter songs & info
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Sep 13 - 11:47 AM

More information about "De Pullman Porters Ball," posted above by Jim Dixon. It was sung by Weber and Fields in "Hoity - Toity" c. 1901, typical of the coon songss popular at the same time as ragtime.

Weber and Fields were very popular at the time; "Dutch" (German immigrants) acts and blackface. "Mike and Meyer" was a popular act.
These stereotypical acts were profitable in vaudeville.
Weber and Fields opened a Music Hall in 1896, featuring some of the greatest performers and singers of the day.
They separated in 1904 but both were successful into the 1930s. They performed their "casino routine" in the 1940 film "Lillian Russell."


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Subject: Lyr Add: PORTERS ON A PULLMAN TRAIN (C D Crandall)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 13 - 04:44 PM

You can see the sheet music for this song at the Levy Collection:


PORTERS ON A PULLMAN TRAIN
Words and music by Charles D. Crandall
New York: Hitchcock and McCargo, ©1880.

1. We need no introduction; you can see just who we are:
Porters on a Pullman train,
Standing at the platform of the sleeping car,
Ready, quick, and willing to explain.
Where you are located, we must be remunerated.
Don't forget the little friendly tip.
We think you oughta give us a qua'ta',
For then you'll have a very pleasant trip.

CHORUS: Porter, porter, give us more air; porter, the window please close.
Porter, this pillow is hard as a rock; porter, come give us more clothes.
Porter, come here; porter, stay there.—All night the people complain.
We are Porters, dandy porters, and we run on the vestibule train
We are porters, dandy porters; we run on the vestibule train.

2. To study human nature, you should travel on the rail.
Those that have the least to say
Are the cultivated, sure as you are born.
They don't try to make a grand display.
But the very shoddy are always dressed so gaudy,
Try to make us think they know it all.
Uneducated and overrated,
While ev'ry night we listen to their call.

3. When our through run is finished, then we strut Sixth Avenue,
With our girls we then parade.
There's style about a darkey dressed in Pullman blue,
That places other darkies in the shade.
We don't carry razors, or wear the striped blazers,
Or with the lower folks associate.
Aristocratic and not erratic,
We're always at your service, never late.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PUT ME OFF AT BUFFALO (H Dillon/J Dillon)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Sep 13 - 07:07 PM

This song should be mentioned in the thread Jokes turned into songs. Indeed, I'm sure I first heard the story in the form of a joke, something like this:
    Man gets on a train, tells the porter, "I'm going to sleep now. Wake me up in time to get off at Buffalo. Now, I'm always grumpy when I first wake up. I might not seem to cooperate, but pay no attention to that. Just make sure I get off at Buffalo."

    Next morning, passenger wakes up to find he has gone way past Buffalo. He yells at the porter, calls him every dirty name in the book, swears he will get him fired, sue the railroad, etc. Then he gets off at the next stop. Another passenger says to the porter, "Boy, he was mad!"

    Porter says, "You think he was mad; you should have seen the guy I put off at Buffalo."
You can see the sheet music for this song at Mississippi State University or The Levy Collection, or hear a recorded version from 1901 at The Library of Congress.


Successfully introduced by Harry Conor in Hoyt's "A Trip to Chinatown"
PUT ME OFF AT BUFFALO
Words by Harry Dillon, music by John Dillon.
New York: M. Witmark & Sons, ©1895.

1. He caught the train at Albany, and to the porter said,
"Put me off at Buffalo."
He was tired and took a sleeper, and says, "Now I'll go to bed,
Just to rest an hour or so."
In an undertone he murmured, "Now I lay me down to wink.
Put me off at Buffalo."
Then he tipped the porter, saying, "Port, old boy, come have a drink.
Put me off at Buffalo, oh, oh.

CHORUS 1: "Don't forget to put me off a Buf-'Hallo'-oh-oh.
My berth is lower five.
If you find me hard to wake,
Oh, don't be afraid to shake.
Throw me off there dead or alive.
Mister Porter, when you call me in the morn," he says,
"I'll kick, but of course it doesn't go.
No matter what I say,
Just remember I'm the jay
That goes off the train when you get to Buffalo."

2. The porter started drinking, and you'd think he owned the road.
When he got to Buffalo,
The train was way behind; the engineer he had a load.
"Take water," he says, "no, no."
When the porter went to call his man, he got at the wrong berth,
Says, "Get off at Buffalo."
Oh, the man he says, "You're wrong, old boy; look out! You'll tear my shirt!
I don't get off at Buffalo, oh, oh."

CHORUS 2: "Don't tell me you won't get off at Buf-'Hallo'-oh-oh.
Be quick and grab your clothes.
Here's the hardest guy to wake,"
Said the porter with a shake.
They exchanged some good hard blows.
Oh, the porter got a soaker, but he fired the man.
With a crash through the window he did go.
Then the man they should 'a' woke,
In his sleep says, "That's a joke.
Put me off the train when we get to Buffalo."

3. When the brakeman shouted "Cleveland!" why, the man jumped out of bed,
And says, "We've gone through Buffalo!"
Then he saw the poor old porter with a bandage on his head,
And his eyes swelled out, oh, oh!
His whiskers they were sandy; in the sand he done a jig.
"Put me off at Buffalo!"
He says, "My wife was waiting at the depot with a rig,
Take me back to Buffalo, oh, I—

CHORUS 3: "Thought I told you: put me off at Buf-'Hallo'-oh-oh.
There's trouble in the air."
Oh, the porter shook with fright.
Yes, he turned from black to white.
Oh, how that coon did stare!
"I'm a dead nigger now," he whispered to himself.
"It's my last trip on the road, I know.
My goodness sakes alive!
Here's the gent in number five.
I put the wrong man off the train at Buffalo."


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