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Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh

GUEST,JTT 12 Oct 13 - 07:36 PM
GUEST 12 Oct 13 - 07:51 PM
GUEST,JTT 12 Oct 13 - 08:16 PM
GUEST 12 Oct 13 - 08:31 PM
GUEST,JTT 12 Oct 13 - 08:34 PM
GUEST 12 Oct 13 - 10:57 PM
Thompson 13 Oct 13 - 03:33 AM
Thompson 15 Oct 13 - 03:57 AM
Jim Carroll 15 Oct 13 - 01:41 PM
Thompson 15 Oct 13 - 02:25 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 07:36 PM

A literal lyrics request in this case. I'm teaching a class using Liam Ó Raghallaigh as an example of narrative, and I can't lay my hands on my CD of Smaointe for the words. I'm giving the students (several not native English speakers, much less Irish speakers) the words in English, and have translated it all except for two lines which I can't catch, just after Neilí's curse on the craftsmen. Can anyone give those two lines (marked with Xes below) to me, either in Irish from the lyrics given in Smaointe's cover notes, which I can translate, or in English?


Liam Ó Raghallaigh

Do you remember that night,
The streets full of action,
Priests and brothers
Discussing our wedding?
The fiddle was on the table,
The harp was sparking,
There were three white women
To put my love to bed.

A widow and a virgin
I am left young;
Bring the story to my people
That my dearest love was drowned.
If I was on the strand that day,
My hands on the rudder,
I give you my word, Mrs O'Reilly
I would well cure your sorrow.

Your eyes are with the eels,
Your mouth is with the crabs,
Your two bright, clear-bright hands
Are under the sharp discipline of the salmon.
I would give five pounds
To the one who would bring my forever loved
But to my sorrow you are alone
Clear-bright Nelly Sheridan.

My curse on the craftsmen
Who made the boat,
Xx
Xx
If I went to the woods of Eochaill,
And bought the wood dear,
My beloved would not have drowned
On the coasts of Malbay.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 07:51 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrWc8vlebOA

Perhaps the lady singing in that video could be of help?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 08:16 PM

Thanks, Guest; I can hear the song - that's how I made the translation - but those two lines aren't clear.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 08:31 PM

Nollaig Ní Laoire

Perhaps trying to get in touch with her will be of assistance. If no one is around to help you in the next 36 hours or so, I'll see if there is a way to contact her. What's your time limit on this?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 08:34 PM

Ah, it's not mad urgent. I'm teaching on Monday, but Smaointe may have turned up by then.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Oct 13 - 10:57 PM

Here are the relevant verses from Brian O'Rourke in 'Blas Meala.'


Mo mhallacht do na saoir a rinne an bad,
'S nár aithris dhom fhéín go raibh an t-éag ins na cláirj
Dá dtéítheá go coillte Eochaill agus an t-adhmad a cheannach daor,                     
Ní báifí mo mhíle stóirín ar chóstaí Mhal Bay.


My curse on the builders who made the boat
and who did not tell me that death was in the boards.
If you had gone to the woods of Eochaill and bought the timber dear,
my thousand little treasures would not have been drowned off the coast of Mai Bay.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: Thompson
Date: 13 Oct 13 - 03:33 AM

Unfortunately, GUEST, Deirbhile Ó Bhrolcháin's version, the one I'll be using in the class, has the verses arranged differently. As you'll see, she has the two lines about the woods of Eochaill there in a different position, ditto the two lines about the curse.
Unless anyone has a CD of Smaointe, I'll just have to go back to tearing the house apart, and listening to that verse again and again.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: Thompson
Date: 15 Oct 13 - 03:57 AM

Right, got it; discovered that a friend had actually designed the cover for the CD, and he sent me the words (in Irish)! So here's the full translation:

Liam Ó Raghallaigh

Do you remember that night,
The streets full of action,
Priests and brothers
Discussing our wedding?
The fiddle was on the table,
The harp was sparking,
There were three white women
To put my love to bed.

A widow and a virgin
I am left young;
Bring the story to my people
That my dearest love was drowned.
If I was on the strand that day,
My hands on the rudder,
I give you my word, Mrs O'Reilly
I would well cure your sorrow.

Your eyes are with the eels,
Your mouth is with the crabs,
Your two bright, clear-bright hands
Are under the sharp discipline of the salmon.
I would give five pounds
To the one who would bring my forever loved
But to my sorrow you are alone
Clear-bright Nelly Sheridan.

My curse on the craftsmen
Who made the boat,
Who did not tell me that death was in the boards;
If you had gone to the woods of Eochaill,
And bought the wood dear,
My beloved would not have drowned
On the coasts of Malbay.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Oct 13 - 01:41 PM

From:
Amráin Muige Seóla
Traditional folk songs from Galway and Mayo Collected By Mrs Costello, Tuam (1923)
Jim Carroll

Do you remember that night? the town was full of horses,
With priests and brothers who were speaking of the wedding.
There was a fiddle on a table, and the harp was being played,
And there were three fair women there to lay out my love.

A widow and a maiden was I left while yet young!
And bear the news to my people that my love was drowned.
If I were on the strand that day and my two hands on the sheet,
My word to you, Mrs. Reilly, 'tis well I would cure your sorrow. |

No wonder sorrow now distracts your mother and your father
And the nurse of the white bosom, who spoke of you when a child.
I'd pass by your wedded wife, who never made your bed,
Since you went to the strand that day, and alas! failed to come home.

I would not consider it above Willie Reilly to be son-in-law to a king,
With bright shining curtains on each side of him in the night,
A gentle, sensible maiden to be arranging his head (on the pillow).
Since we were engaged to one another, alas, that you should have died from me (in my time) !

The monsters have your eyes, and the crabs your mouth;
Your two bright white hands are in the power of the salmon.
I would give five pounds to the person who would take up my love,
But, my grief, that you are left alone, fair Nelly Jordan !

The blessing of God on the three who went to Kilannin
To hurry Father Peter, who was eighty years old.
If you came in a month's time, but, my grief, you will never come!
How sad for a woman in the night, and her spouse upon the waves!

My curse on the tradesmen who made the boat,
Because they did not tell me that death was in the boards.
If you had gone to Killtogher and bought timber that was dear,
My love would not be drowned on the coast of Malbay.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Liam Ó Raghallaigh
From: Thompson
Date: 15 Oct 13 - 02:25 PM

Thank you, Jim. A couple of extra verses in Amhráin Mhuighe Sheola that Deirbhile Ó Bhrolcháin (whose version I was playing for my students) doesn't have, and some different phrasings.
The translation of péist as 'monsters' is pretty odd. It can be used to mean various things, including whale, lamprey, sea-serpent and generalised monster, but I think it's pretty clear she's talking about a more normal scavenger here - the eel is paired with the crab and the salmon as feasting on the body of the unfortunate bridegroom who went off to fetch the 80-year-old priest to marry the couple and was drowned on his journey.


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