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Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300

ripov 01 Mar 14 - 06:57 PM
GUEST,leeneia 02 Mar 14 - 10:36 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Mar 14 - 11:19 AM
GUEST 02 Mar 14 - 11:49 AM
GUEST 05 Mar 14 - 04:39 PM
Phil Edwards 06 Mar 14 - 05:41 AM
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Subject: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: ripov
Date: 01 Mar 14 - 06:57 PM

Those fluent in reading square dots and hexagonal letters may be interested in this.

http://www.diamm.ac.uk/resources/sbs/

Although British appears to have a large Latin content. One of these at least is played in sessions though; and unpublished material is promised!


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Subject: RE: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 02 Mar 14 - 10:36 AM

Thanks, ripov. I like that old stuff.

Too bad I couldn't get to see it. They told me I had to register, then they told me account registration is disabled while they review their user agreement.

"First thing, let's kill all the lawyers."


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Subject: RE: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Mar 14 - 11:19 AM

I'm sure that you know that the most accessible collection of songs from that period is still available as a reprint (1968) - 'The Political Songs of England' from the reign of John to that of Edward II, by Thomas Wright.
I still kick myself for not buying a first edition for half-nothing because I decided I couldn't read Medieval French, Latin and Old English - good translations to all the songs.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Mar 14 - 11:49 AM

It's available online.


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Subject: RE: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Mar 14 - 04:39 PM

I guess the reason for beginning with John is that it's only with his loss of the Angevin Empire after the Battle of Bouvines that it became sensible to talk of a distinctively English identity: but on the other hand, England's relationship with Flanders means that it's impossible to separate the roots of English motet from the Flemish, as typified by the way the Dufay L'Homme Armé cantus firmus mass was adopted as a source in the late fifteenth/early sixteenth century.
By beginning there, they missed Richard I's work, for starters, not to mention the seminal thinking in musical theory of Hucbald, the core of musical knowledge until the start of the 17th Century saw it completed by Erycus Puteanus, completing the foundations explored by Bach. Sure, there are huge generalisations in this sketchiest of replies, for example the influence of the Notre Dame school, but part of the question not really addressed hitherto is the pagan element of folk song, the embedded vernacular creed which underlies so much. Was it an anachronistic invention along the lines of modern druidism, or can the Robert Graves approach to the White Craft be defended?


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Subject: RE: Sources of British Song, c.1150-1300
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 06 Mar 14 - 05:41 AM

Ote ta moustache, Sabrina, on t'a reconnu.


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