Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: Irish War of Independence Song

raheenranger 12 Jun 14 - 07:38 AM
mayomick 12 Jun 14 - 08:26 AM
GUEST,raheenranger 13 Jun 14 - 06:06 PM
GUEST 13 Jun 14 - 07:05 PM
Seamus Kennedy 13 Jun 14 - 08:09 PM
Jim Carroll 14 Jun 14 - 07:02 AM
mayomick 14 Jun 14 - 04:33 PM
mayomick 14 Jun 14 - 04:39 PM
GUEST,raheenranger 18 Jun 14 - 05:47 PM
GUEST,Patrick Wall 17 Dec 14 - 11:28 AM
bubblyrat 18 Dec 14 - 08:48 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: raheenranger
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 07:38 AM

Has anyone any information on the following Irish War of Independence song and/or details on the Rossmore ambush mentioned? I recorded it in Birr in 1990 but have never heard it elsewhere. I now that Ann Mulqueen recorded a song called The Ambush at Rossmore but I have not got it and dont know if there is a link.
I would appreciate input, Thanks - Tony.

Just as the cocks were a crowing, a loud knocking there came to my door
Sure I thought 'twas the boys who were returning from the ambush below at Rossmore
As I peeped through a hole in the shutter, such a fine sight my eyes they had seen
For outside stood the gallant ……….. sporting Erin's proud banner of Green.

It was gently they entered my cabin and they stacked up their guns on the floor
"'Tis a cold stormy night" said the Captain "to be crossing the wild Galtymore
Oh come fill us a glass and we'll pay you for we're traitors to England's proud Queen
We heard away over the mountain that around here you keep a shebeen".

So she filled up the glasses, they paid her "Here's a toast to our comrades" they cried
To the bravest, the noblest of heroes on the green fields of Ireland who died.
Here's a health to the gallant Sean Treacy, Danny Lacey and bold Cathal Brugha
To the bravest, the noblest of heroes who died to give Ireland her due.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: mayomick
Date: 12 Jun 14 - 08:26 AM

I imagine it must have been written when Thequeen rather than Theking was on the throne . It should be "Dinny Lacey" in the last verse .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: GUEST,raheenranger
Date: 13 Jun 14 - 06:06 PM

Thanks a million for that, I should have picked up the Dinny Lacey error. Actually the missing word in the last line of the first verse is
"irregulars" which suggests that it is a song of the Civil War rather than the War of independence.
Can anyone offer any info on the Rossmore Ambush?

My guess is also that I am missing a few verses here.
Tony


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Jun 14 - 07:05 PM

That bit about the king/ queen is suggestive. Songs didn't arrive from nowhere; they were constructed on a cultural and historical template. Or to put it another way, existing songs were adapted to local current conditions. This is possibly a song originally about a much older event, adapted for the Civil War.

A young lad called Jim O'Sullivan from Rossmore (but which Rossmore?) was killed at Kilmichael. There is a Rossmore in Tipperary; Dinny Lacey was from Tipperary However Sullivan joined the IRA apparently in Kilmeen in Carberry (Cork), so this isn't much of a lead. But the times were so confused that it's possible that there was an action in Tipperary that went unrecorded.

It would have been a bold action to give them houseroom at the time; if it had been found out, the hosts could have been summarily executed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 13 Jun 14 - 08:09 PM

It could be sung to "Rosin the Bow".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Jun 14 - 07:02 AM

Another take on the theme with comprehensive information
Jim Carroll

Galtee Mountain Boy
I joined the Flying Column in nineteen and sixteen,
In Cork with Seán Moylan, in Tipperary with Dan Breen,
Arrested by Free Staters and sentenced for to die,
Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee Mountain Boy.

We went across the valleys and over the hilltops green,
Where we met with Dinny Lacy, Seán Hogan and Dan Breen,
Seán Moylan and his gallant men that kept the flag flying high,
Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee mountain boy.

We trekked the Wicklow Mountains, we were rebels on the run,
Though hunted night and morning, we were outlaws but free men;
We trekked the Dublin Mountains as the sun 'twas shining high,
Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee mountain boy.

I'll bid farewell to old Clonmel that I never more will see,
And to the Galtee mountains that ofttimes sheltered me;
The men that fought for their liberty and died without a sigh,
May their cause be ne'er forgotten, said the Galtee Mountain Boy.

Patsy Halloran with an added verse by Christy Moore

Flying Columns - groups of men who roamed the countryside carrying out ambushes on British Crown soldiers during Ireland's War of Independence from 1919 to 1921. During the third phase of that war, roughly from August 1920 to July 1921, the Irish Republican Army (IRA) faced a greatly expanded British force, so they changed their tactics from attacking well defended barracks to employing ambush warfare. To this end the IRA was re-organised into flying columns - permanent guerrilla units, usually with about twenty men, though sometimes larger. In rural areas, these flying columns usually had bases in remote mountainous areas.
Flying columns were also used again during the Irish Civil War from June 1922 to May 1923 which was a conflict that accompanied the establishment of the Irish Free State as an entity independent from the United Kingdom within the British Empire. That conflict was waged between two opposing groups of Irish nationalists: the forces of the new Free State, who supported the Anglo-Irish Treaty under which the state was established, and the Republican opposition, for whom the Treaty represented a betrayal of the Irish Republic. The war was won by the Free State forces.
Additional notes:
Seán Moylan [1888-1957] - commandant of the Irish Republican Army and a senior Sinn Féin and Fianna Fáil politician. After the Irish War of Independence he also served under Taoiseach Éamon de Valera as Minister for Lands (1943-1948), Minister for Education (1951-1954), and Minister for Agriculture (1957).
Daniel Breen (Irish: Mícheál Dónall Ó Briaoin; 1894-1969) - volunteer in the Irish Republican Army and a Fianna Fáil politician, joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood in 1912 and the Irish Volunteers in 1914. On 21 January 1919, the day the First Dáil met in Dublin, Breen took part in an ambush at Soloheadbeg. The ambush party, led by Seán Treacy, attacked a group of Royal Irish Constabulary men who were escorting explosives to a quarry and two policemen were shot dead during the engagement. The ambush is considered to be the first action taken in the Irish War of Independence.
Seán Hogan [1900-1968] - one of the leaders of the 3rd Tipperary Brigade of the Irish Republican Army during the War of Independence. On 21 January 1919, Hogan and Dan Breen, together with Seán Treacy, Séamus Robinson and five other IRA members helped to ignite the conflict that was to become the Irish War of Independence. They shot dead two members of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) at Soloheadbeg in County Tipperary. The RIC men were transporting gelignite explosives, when they refused to surrender them, the IRA shot them dead. Robinson was the organiser of the action, while Treacy was the logistics expert. As a result of the action, South Tipperary was placed under martial law and declared a Special Military Area under The Defence of the Realm Act.
Dennis (Dinny) Lacey [1890-1923] - Irish Republican Army officer during the Irish War of Independence and anti-Treaty IRA officer during the Irish Civil War, he joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913 and was sworn in to the secretive Irish Republican Brotherhood in 1914. During the War of Independence (1919-1921) he commanded an IRA flying column in Tipperary. In July 1920, this guerrilla unit mounted two successful ambushes of British forces - killing six British soldiers at Thomastown, county Kilkenny and four RIC men in the Glen of Aherlow. In April 1921, following another ambush of British troops near Clogheen, he captured RIC inspector Gilbert Potter, who he later executed in reprisal of the British hanging of republican prisoners. In December 1921, his unit split over the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Lacey was against the Treaty and most of his men followed suit. He was later made head of the anti-Treaty IRA's Second Southern Division. In the ensuing civil war (June 1922-May 1923), he organised guerrilla activity in north county Tipperary against Irish Free State (pro-Treaty) forces. He was killed in an action with Free State troops in the Glen of Aherlow on February 18, 1923.
Clonmel (Irish: Cluain Meala) - county seat of South Tipperary County Council in County Tipperary, mainly on the northern bank of the River Suir with a smaller section south of the river. It lies in a valley, surrounded by mountains and hills. The Comeragh Mountains are to the south, while northeast of the town is Slievenamon. The town is noted in Irish history as having withstood Cromwell's forces who sacked both Drogheda and Wexford.

Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: mayomick
Date: 14 Jun 14 - 04:33 PM

Ann Mulquee "I got this ballad from Teddy Barry of Bunmahon, Co Waterford."

I sent Teddy Barry of waterford a message asking him if he can help. He's a musician :
https://www.facebook.com/teddyandcathal?fref=ts


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: mayomick
Date: 14 Jun 14 - 04:39 PM

On the sleeve notes ,Anne McQueen says she got the ballad from Teddy Barry of Waterford. A Teddy Barry who's a singer and accordian player from Waterford is on facebook :https://www.facebook.com/teddyandcathal?fref=ts
I'll message him to see if he has any info.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: GUEST,raheenranger
Date: 18 Jun 14 - 05:47 PM

Hi Mayomick,
I would love to know if the Ann Mulqueen song is the same as the above
and ,if so, has she more verses?
I have not been able to get my hands on the recording. If you have the MP3, perhaps you might post it or send it to me at tonym2304@gmail.com.

Many Thanks


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: GUEST,Patrick Wall
Date: 17 Dec 14 - 11:28 AM

Hi Maymick,

I am a blues singer from Waterford and can confirm the Teddy Barry on facebook is the same Teddy. He and his wife, Eileen Mulqueen (Anne's sister) featured on 3 of my CDs back in 2008/09. He is a friend of mine and if I meet him, I can ask about this song.

Patrick.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Irish War of Independence Song
From: bubblyrat
Date: 18 Dec 14 - 08:48 AM

I used to be in a "folk group" with some Irish people whilst serving in the Royal Navy ; we even had a strong supporter in the form of the ship's Irish Master-At-Arms , Paddy Calnan, for whom we performed to raise money for Nazareth House Childrens'Home in Plymouth.We sang a great many Irish "rebel songs" which would be inadvisable today, and indeed was,after about 1968/69 .However, in a peculiar way, these songs of disobedience and rebellion , even insurrection,were very popular in the Armed Forces , particularly the Navy, as they were a way of letting our feelings of repression and frustration known to our superiors !! But once Dylan stole the tune to "The Patriot Game" some of the appeal was lost forever.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 21 July 4:09 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.