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Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah

Fergie 03 Jul 14 - 04:56 PM
GUEST,# 03 Jul 14 - 05:09 PM
GUEST,# 03 Jul 14 - 06:05 PM
JennieG 03 Jul 14 - 06:34 PM
Fergie 05 Jul 14 - 09:31 AM
GUEST,ketchdana 05 Jul 14 - 12:58 PM
Dennis the Elder 05 Jul 14 - 04:36 PM
Joe Offer 06 Jul 14 - 03:18 AM
Fergie 06 Jul 14 - 08:22 AM
Dennis the Elder 19 Jul 14 - 09:27 AM
Fergie 19 Jul 14 - 02:15 PM
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Subject: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Fergie
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 04:56 PM

Hi all,

Was searching for little know Australian songs online and stumbled on The Lass of Yackandandah (plus another poem of the same name)

Q1   Anybody know of it's origin?
Q2   Anybody know the air?
Q3   How do Aussies pronounce Yackandandah?

THE LASS OF YACKANDANDAH

Let poets sing of English girls,
Their beauty and their candour
Give me a sweeter nymph than all,
The lass of Yackandandah.

When dressed in all her Sunday best,
No Melbourne belle looks grander;
In sheeny Sabbath satin shines
The lass of Yackandandah.

Her spotless name hath never known
One touch or taint of slander,
Though barmaid at the 'Harrow' is
The lass of Yackandandah.

I'd like to see the man who'd dare
With calumny to brand her,
He'd find he'd got his match in her,
The lass of Yackandandah.

Her tongue subdues us, one and all -
We dare not reprimand her;
Each brawling sot is mute before
The lass of Yackandandah.

The lazy landlord long has ceased
The effort to command her;
And in the 'Harrow' reigns supreme
The lass of Yackandandah.

She draws a cork with such an air,
No mortal can withstand her
She turns a tap, and turns our heads,
The lass of Yackandandah.

When she's behind the bar, I stand
And stare, like any gander
Whereat, she calls me silly goose,
The lass of Yackandandah.

For her dear sake a goose I'd be,
A bunyip, salamander,
Or anything, in short, to win
The lass of Yackandandah.

I wish I were Belshazzar, or
The Emperor Alexander,
My crown I'd lay at her dear feet,
The lass of Yackandandah.

My wages all in drinking healths
To her, I weekly squander,
Yet cannot drown my passion for
The lass of Yackandandah.

When in the house, from off her face
My eyes they never wander,
But do not melt her stony heart,
The lass of Yackandandah.

Her coldness is enough to raise
An angel's bile or dander,
She'll be the death of me I know,
The lass of Yackandandah.

"Oh would that I, in marriage, could
Within a week demand her.
For rest I can't, till I obtain
The lass of Yackandandah.

Fergus Russell


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: GUEST,#
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 05:09 PM

Monday, June 22, 1857

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/2459941


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: GUEST,#
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 06:05 PM

I'm not finding much, but because Yackandandah has a folk festival each year (for the past 18 years) it might be worthwhile for you to pursue that route also. The town has a population of 600 people so there are likely folks there who might be aware of the 'TLoY'. You can reach the festival people at

http://yackfolkfestival.com/contact-us/


Another place to try might be

Contact: Yackandandah Visitor Information Centre
Phone: 02 6027 1988 (VIC)
Website: www.uniqueyackandandah.com.au
Email: adminuniqueyackandandah.com.au
Address: 37 High Street (The Old Post Office), PO Box 28, Beechworth 3747 VIC


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: JennieG
Date: 03 Jul 14 - 06:34 PM

I've been to Yackandandah, it's a nice little town. I remember having a rather nice cake at a cafe. (I remember my travels by food, you know.......)

It's pronounced as it is spelt. Yack-an-dan-dah, with emphasise the third syllable.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Fergie
Date: 05 Jul 14 - 09:31 AM

Thanks for your help. I was speaking to an Aussie from Perth and he suggested that it is pronounced in 'strian as Yeck-an-dAN-da.

In my first post I mentioned that I had found a poem of the same name and for completeness I'm posting it below. And I'd like to comment that she must have been an exceptional woman to merit two fine examples of colonial literature.

THE LASS OF YACKANDANDAH.

Too prone to love, I vainly try
To hide the blush and check the sigh,
And dim the glances of the eye.
Which tell, as plain as can be, O
That I, a slave to woman's wiles,
And all those sweetly roguish smiles,
Which recompense her votaries toils,
'Am bound to Yackandandah, O

Yes, here my flame is Beauty's queen,
A bar-room is her court, I ween,
Her dispensations I have seen
The best of rum and brandy, O
Mounted upon a filly neat
The long train flying o'er her feet
With pride I've watched her bounding fleet,
Thro' dusty Yackandandah, O

I've heard her powers of repartee,
Amongst our choice society,
Composed of many a bullocky
And shepherd man so dandy, O
Seen how majestic 'mid the clowns,
She stills their gush with little frowns,
Yet humours, well, the "knock-em-downs"
That favour Yackandandah, O

Then I have loved, and loving said,
This is a most accomplished maid
Such grace and business tact displayed
To modern swain, how handy, O
Smite by her powerful charms, was I,
Have proffered love, and feigned to die,
But vain-this, the dear rogue's reply,
You're green for Yackandandah O

Ah, well I know she acts a part,
Yet keeps unsmirched a priceless heart,
Of common life, be sure the art,
All can't be sugar-candy, O
Statesmen their votaries despise,
Parsons but fool the not o'er wise,
Your lawyers thrive by glossing lies,
Pardon, then, Yackandandah, O


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: GUEST,ketchdana
Date: 05 Jul 14 - 12:58 PM

"Q3 How do Aussies pronounce Yackandandah?"

The name of the town seems pretty straightforward.
It might have more to do with how Aussies might pronounce 'candour, grander, slander, ...': "can-dah, gran-dah, slan-dah, ...".
(But then there's that second poem, where it rhymes with 'can be, brandy, handy, ...'.)


--Bob


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 05 Jul 14 - 04:36 PM

The last and only time we were in Yackandandah we were on holiday in two cars when one of them broke down outside the Town Hall. We had to travel back to Geelong in just one small car, 5 adults one dog and all the luggage for a one weeks stay in that area. Not the easiest of journeys. Our stay in the area is still one we look back on with happiness.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jul 14 - 03:18 AM

Hi, Fergie -

Is this (click) where you found the lyrics you posted?

I looked all over for a recording or sheet music, but didn't have any luck. Interesting song, though.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Fergie
Date: 06 Jul 14 - 08:22 AM

That's it Joe.

The 1st is from The Courier (Hobart) of Mon. 22 June 1857.

The 2nd is from Fitzroy City Press (Victoria) of Thur 25 Feb. 1897.

Fergus Russell


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 19 Jul 14 - 09:27 AM

I've been in touch with Chris, Artist Liaison for the Organisers of Yackandandah Folk Festival. At this moment he knows nothing of the song, just the poem, but has promised to delve into the matter and contact artists who he believe may help with the tune the song is sung to.


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Subject: RE: Origins: The Lass of Yackandandah
From: Fergie
Date: 19 Jul 14 - 02:15 PM

Thanks Dennis, I look forward to hearing of any developments or progress in nailing down this interesting song.

Fergus Russell


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