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Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall

Ross Campbell 17 Nov 14 - 04:43 PM
GUEST,# 18 Nov 14 - 09:35 AM
Ross Campbell 18 Nov 14 - 09:49 AM
GUEST,# 18 Nov 14 - 10:25 AM
GUEST,henryp 18 Nov 14 - 10:28 AM
GUEST,henryp 18 Nov 14 - 07:40 PM
Ross Campbell 18 Nov 14 - 08:17 PM
Ross Campbell 18 Nov 14 - 08:19 PM
GUEST,henryp 19 Nov 14 - 06:38 AM
Ross Campbell 19 Nov 14 - 08:04 AM
GUEST,henryp 20 Nov 14 - 05:22 AM
Ross Campbell 20 Nov 14 - 06:45 PM
Ross Campbell 21 Nov 14 - 08:34 PM
GUEST 22 Nov 14 - 05:40 AM
GUEST,henryp 22 Nov 14 - 05:42 AM
Ross Campbell 22 Nov 14 - 08:16 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 17 Nov 14 - 04:43 PM

I came across this fragment of what appears to have been a well-known song while following up something else. The verse appears in a book, "Ports, Harbours, Watering Places and Coast Scenery of Great Britain" by William Finden, Edward Francis Finden, and William Henry Bartlett(1838, 2nd ed 1842).

Google searches all seem to lead back to this source, with no additional verses coming to light.

Here is the verse:-

"I've climb'd the Alps,—I've cross'd the seas,
And travers'd many a land,
Where summer smiles on spicy isles,
And coral decks the strand:
But the fairest spot that Earth can boast,
Is here, by the blue sea-wall,
And the fairest maid on her native coast
Is the Lass of Lytham Hall," &c. &c.

Here is the link to the scanned page containing the verse:-

"Ports, Harbours etc" (Google Books scan)

Any ideas on where/how to find the rest of it? (And no, unfortunately it's not on the next page!)

Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,#
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 09:35 AM

Hi, Ross. Coming up empty here. Are you sure there are more stanzas?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 09:49 AM

The "&c. &c." at the end of the quoted verse (as shown in the scan linked above) suggests that there would have been more. That's all I'm going on.
Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,#
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 10:25 AM

OK, thank you. I'll go look around s'more, but it sure looks thin out there :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 10:28 AM

Was this really the 'melancholy dirge' sung by the troops of Bonnie Prince Charlie on their retreat from Derby? It seems a strange choice.

But, if the original verses are lost, we can write some more!

Incidentally, Lytham Hall, along with other halls in Lancashire, has been suggested as a home for Shakespeare in his lost years. Now it is celebrated for its annual display of snowdrops.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 07:40 PM

I've climb'd the Alps, I've cross'd the seas,
And travers'd many a land,
Where summer smiles on spicy isles,
And coral decks the strand:

Chorus
But the fairest spot that Earth can boast,
Is here, by the blue sea-wall,
And the fairest maid on her native coast
Is the Lass of Lytham Hall

And on the green once could be seen
Walking the young Shakespeare
Who could say then that from his pen
Would timeless plays appear

Chorus

And when the sun has just begun
To warm the frozen field
The snowdrop wakes and effort makes
A carpet white to yield

Chorus


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 08:17 PM

It might seem odd that Preston is mentioned briefly as an aside in the section on Lytham, but the book was published forty years before Preston Docks were opened, so at the time Preston did not fall under the remit of the book's title.

The way I read it, the "Lass of Lytham Hall" verse is intended as a foot-note to the Lytham section, and is not the "melancholy dirge" of the Preston paragraph.

No mention of Shakespeare (or the snowdrops!) in the Lytham Hall Wikipedia article. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lytham_Hall) My friend the late Diane Corner was instrumental in raising the funding which allowed Lytham Town Trust to purchase the Hall in 1997 when Guardian Royal Exchange (later AXA) ceased occupying the building.

Ross

PS Nice to hear from you, Henry. Any good music coming up? I might ask Ron Baxter to take up your challenge to write some extra verses if the search draws a blank!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 18 Nov 14 - 08:19 PM

Cross-posted!
Nice work, Henry.
Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 19 Nov 14 - 06:38 AM

Hello Ross, here's another romantic verse;

And when the sun, his journey run
Sinks slowly out of view
The sky entire consum'd by fire
Takes on a crimson hue

(But) the fairest spot that Earth can boast,
Is here, by the blue sea-wall,
And the fairest maid on her native coast
Is the Lass of Lytham Hall

The blue sea-wall is a little mysterious too. I've never noticed that either the sea or the sea-wall was blue at Lytham.

At high tide, you can sail across the Ribble and enjoy a pint at the Flying Fish - the Dolphin - on Longton marsh.

You still need a tune!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 19 Nov 14 - 08:04 AM

I think it would fit to "The Lass of Richmond Hill", but maybe needs its own melody.
I also was puzzled by "the blue sea-wall" - maybe a white-washed wall in shadow?

Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 20 Nov 14 - 05:22 AM

Ross - A final contribution. As you can see, Shakespeare has been my inspiration. Henry

The setting sun, his journey run
Sinks slowly out of view
The sky entire consumed by fire
Takes on a crimson hue

And far away across the bay
Bare mountains proud they stand
But here the scene is dressed in green
With nature close at hand

The tide, we know, will ebb and flow
And sun make way for rain
Her beauty bright - by day or night
It constant will remain


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 20 Nov 14 - 06:45 PM

Thanks for your efforts, Henry.

I'm beginning to think there may be no more than the original verse. The lack of attribution in Finden's Ports and Harbours suggests that it might be traditional, but it could equally well be the product of one of the book's compilers. The complete lack of result from Google line-by-line searches might suggest that the verse never appeared in any other printed source - or that such a source hasn't yet been scanned and made available to the internet.

Ross


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 21 Nov 14 - 08:34 PM

Last call?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Nov 14 - 05:40 AM

Ross - Your book was published in 1838.

I wondered if the Lass of Lytham Hall was a particular girl. This event mentions some female inhabitants of Lytham Hall;

"Looking for an all-in treat for mums this Mother's Day? Lytham Hall can help. We are offering a special tour of the Hall, focusing on the Ladies of Lytham Hall.

Hear all about John Talbot Clifton's affair with Lillie Langtry and how Lillian, the capricious wife of Harry Clifton, met with a nasty accident. Find out more about Violet Clifton's fascinating life and get up closer to hypochondriac Hetty, Jane, Eleanor Cecily and Easter Daffodil. This special tour will be followed by a sumptuous afternoon tea in the tea room, after which you can stroll around the daffodil-strewn gardens."

Violet Clifton 1883-1961

Eleanor Cecily Clifton (Lowther)
Birthdate:        December 20, 1822
Birthplace:        St. George Hanover Square, London, England
Wife of John Talbot Clifton (MP)

Hetty Clifton 1788-1864
Wife of David Campbell of Kildalloig and Thomas Joseph Clifton
Mother of John Talbot Clifton (MP); Thomas Henry Clifton; Charles Frederick Abney-Hastings; Arthur Edward Clifton and Augustus Wykeham Clifton

Mr Thomas Clifton who built Lytham Hall married Lady Jane Bertie in 1760. He died in 1783 and was succeeded by his eldest son son John Clifton (b. 1764). John Clifton married Elizabeth Riddell in 1785, and had three daughters, Elizabeth (m. 1814), Mary (d. 1800) and Harriet. Perhaps the Lass of Lytham Hall belonged to this generation?

Sir Thomas and Lady Jane Clifton had a son John and three daughters, Eleanora, Catherine and Sophia, who was living unmarried in 1833.

Sophia Clifton 1772-1851 15 November 1851 The Tablet
On the Feast of All Saints, Miss Sophia Clifton, daughter of Thomas and Lady Jane Clifton, died at Lytham at the venerable age of seventy-nine. The deceased was aunt to the present Earl of Shrewsbury, and to the late Thomas Clifton. Esq., of Lytham Hall. She was universally respected, and most charitable to the poor, Protestant as well as Catholic. The was interred on yesterday week, at the Willows, Kirkham.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 22 Nov 14 - 05:42 AM

That was from me!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Lass of Lytham Hall
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 22 Nov 14 - 08:16 PM

Sign in, Henry, it's easy! And thanks for the extra info.


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