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NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society

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Stewart 26 May 15 - 10:48 PM
Joe Offer 26 May 15 - 11:28 PM
Stewart 27 May 15 - 12:12 AM
Deckman 27 May 15 - 07:41 AM
GUEST,mg 27 May 15 - 04:40 PM
Stewart 27 May 15 - 05:20 PM
Deckman 27 May 15 - 06:13 PM
Don Firth 27 May 15 - 06:46 PM
Don Firth 27 May 15 - 09:22 PM
GUEST,Anita Merando 27 May 15 - 09:43 PM
Stewart 27 May 15 - 11:12 PM
Stewart 27 May 15 - 11:50 PM
Don Firth 28 May 15 - 12:44 AM
GUEST,Anita Merando 28 May 15 - 07:10 AM
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Subject: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Stewart
Date: 26 May 15 - 10:48 PM

The June/July issue of the NW HOOT, on-line publication of the Pacific Northwest Folklore Society is just out. View it here.

This Issue features an article by Stewart Hendrickson: "The Pacific NW Folklore Society - Past, Present & Future;" "Music Changes the Brain" by Laurie Riley; and a CD Review - The Coffee Stories - Anita Rose Meranda, by Bob Nelson. On Saturday, June 13, we begin a monthly 2nd Saturday Community Sing at the Couth Buzzard from noon - 1 pm.
Upcoming concerts at the Couth Buzzard will feature a Buskers' Night on June 12 with Reggie Miles, Jeanne Towne, and Hobbit & Hare; and Piper Stock Hill on July 10.

Cheers, S. in Seattle


Cheers, S. in Seattle


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 May 15 - 11:28 PM

I thought Bob (Deckman) was threatening to retire from his writing career. Glad to see he has an article in the issue. His stories are always fascinating.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Stewart
Date: 27 May 15 - 12:12 AM

Yes, he's threatened to retire from this writing many times, but then he comes back again. I hope he'll write another piece.

Cheers, S. in Seattle


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Deckman
Date: 27 May 15 - 07:41 AM

Stew ... I have to agree with you that we have clearly come a very long way in eight years. I hesitate to say "we", as you have done most of the work, as well you know. To remember the many concerts, jams, attempted new venues (some successful and some not)is enough to make me tired, all over again. As you so well point out, it is time for others to step forward and seize the reigns.

In this most recent issue of The Hoot I was delighted with Laurie Riley's article "Music Changes the Brain." She says some things that I've witnessed many times. Years ago I was fortunate to be able to hang out with some excellant classical musicians. These were professional musicians who spent most of their working and learning lives completly submerged in the wonderful world of music. Beyond the exciting musical results, I always enjoyed the spin-offs in the way of word games, various languages spoken, puns, you name it. I well remember one eighteen hour road trip we took where we kept ourselves awake and well playing the old verbal word game of "Botacelli" (sp?) Only musicians with fertile and alive minds can come up with that kind of thinking. Quite marvelous.

I was also pleased that you included the review of Anita's wonderful CD, "The Coffee Tales." Her musical contributions alone are enough by themselves, but when you add those marvelous tales of growing up in an Italian family in the fourties and fifties is the folk process at it's best. She has told me that her intial motivation to document these stories was to share them with her son Jesse.

As for any future writing I might do. I 'dunno? Writing does not come easy to me, and by and large I do not enjoy it. Everyone seems to think that the end results are adequate, but those results come at a cost. I'm sure that many writers on MudCat who read this will agree.

Again Stew ... thank you for what you do ... bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 27 May 15 - 04:40 PM

You are a great writer..both of songs and of prose.

I liked Laurie's article but did not totally agree with her. Getting rid of music teachers in a school is not exactly the same as getting rid of music altogether...certainly the class can sing row row row the boat or sing along with a record or guest visitors can lead them in songs, they can play tambourines etc. I agree that it is a wonderful thing for most children to have. Some are indifferent and I don't know how much or if it benefits them...but there are ways to get it into schools for absolutely free if the interest is there. I am not convinced that school orchestras are all that necessary. Just ordinary jam sessions with instruments that are more common..autoharp, guitar etc.


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Stewart
Date: 27 May 15 - 05:20 PM

Hi Mary,

It's not just about music teachers in the schools, but musical experiences and the other arts. This can be done in many ways. The the El Sistema youth music program, which began in Venezuela, has spread to other countries and cities, including Seattle. Here's an article I wrote for the NW HOOT some time ago. I strongly support this program, and have also donated one of my old violins to it's cause. In our affluent public schools there are some wonderful music programs, but it's in the disadvantaged schools (Seattle's central district, for example) where kids are being left out - they can benefit greatly from this program, even if they do not become professional musicians.

Seattle Music Project
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, NOT GUNS
by Stewart Hendrickson
From the NW HOOT, January, 2013

"The huge spiritual world that music produces in itself, ends up overcoming material poverty. From the minute a child's taught how to play an instrument, he's no longer poor. He becomes a child in progress, heading for a professional level, who'll later become a citizen." - Maestro José Antonio Abreu, founder of the El Sistema youth music program in Venezuela. Read More

Cheers, S. in Seattle


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Deckman
Date: 27 May 15 - 06:13 PM

I'm NOT at all sure that teaching music in public schools is a good thing. I mean, after all, suppose we teach youngsters to make music, then they might start to write music. And THEN ... before you know it ... they might start to write music that we might NOT like, I mean ... REALLY ... we might even have another whole generation of ... GAWD FORGIVE ME ... PROTEST SINGERS ... sheeeeuh! bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Don Firth
Date: 27 May 15 - 06:46 PM

I had the good fortune to go to a fairly large high school in Seattle ([Teddy] Roosevelt High School) in the late 1940s—prehistoric times) that had exemplary music, art, and drama departments. Every year, they put on a full-blown musical, such as Show Boat or The Fortune Teller, and a Senior Play, a full-length drama such as You Can't Take It with You or Our Town. Advised by faculty, but all of the acting and singing was done by students.

And the school had a full symphony orchestra, which provided music for these events, along with a couple of concerts a year. Although it was conducted by one of the music teachers, all of the musicians were students. They also gave a couple of full concerts each year.

Roosevelt was also fortunate in that it had a full concert hall (capacity, 1,500), frequently rented by musicians and drama groups not connected with the school.

Two of my personal friends at Roosevelt High School were Barbara Johanson (later, Coffin), a big voiced soprano, who went on to sing with Seattle Opera and several other opera companies, and Frank Bouley, who sang a bit part with Bing Crosby in "Mr. Music," then went to Broadway, where he performed in a number of musicals, including "DamnYankees."   He also had bit parts in around fifty movies. A substantial number of other Roosevelt grads went on to careers in music and acting, aided by the excellent training and experience they got in high school.

I am all for music, art, and drama in the schools, not just for the training and experience the participating students get, but the opportunity for the other students, along with their family and friends, to experience these surprisingly profession quality events.

Some students who just watched and listened at the time, might just be inspired to become actors, singers, or musicians later on....

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Don Firth
Date: 27 May 15 - 09:22 PM

I think I may have remembered the Roosevelt High auditorium as being larger than it really was. I believe it was more like 750 or 800. In any case, it was a big as many movie theaters, and music and drama groups not connected to the school would often rent it for performances.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: GUEST,Anita Merando
Date: 27 May 15 - 09:43 PM

I just have to thank Bob Nelson for reintroducing me to PNWFS. In the 8 years that I have been back her on the East Coast, Bob has sent me many links to articles about people dear to me. Howdy all from Cold Spring, NY.
Cheers, Anita Rose Merando


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Stewart
Date: 27 May 15 - 11:12 PM

Don: The new auditorium (Performing Arts Center) in the newly rebuilt Roosevelt High School in Seattle officially seats 750 people. It also houses a completely rebuilt M.P. Möller Pipe Organ. - Opus 6861, 1940. This is not your typical average high school and arts program. The Roosevelt Jazz Band often takes top honors in the Essentially Ellington competition in New York. My grandson will be performing a clarinet solo in the orchestra concert there next week.

Anita: Welcome to Mudcat - nice to meet you. I enjoyed your new CD - thanks to Bob for introducing you to me.

To everyone else: We produce this on-line publication, the NW HOOT, every two months. I would be happy to put you on our email list (a link is on the NW HOOT home page). Anyone interested in submitting an article, contact me.

Oh, and Bob: I think Woody and Pete learned their protest songs outside of public schools.

Cheers, S. in Seattle


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Stewart
Date: 27 May 15 - 11:50 PM

Correction - our email link is not on the NW HOOT home page
It is on our PNWFS home page here, in the column under Welcome


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: Don Firth
Date: 28 May 15 - 12:44 AM

Yeah, Stewart, I remember that organ. I heard it a number of times—especially when organist Richard Ellsasser played a recital on it sometime around 1948 or '49.

Roosevelt didn't have a jazz program when I was there (1946-49). I don't think it was regarded as "serious" music back then. But then, it took the University of Washington School of Music awhile to wake up to the fact that jazz and folk music are serious music. And, yes, the guitar IS a serious musical instrument! I got a lot of crappola when I was in the music department in the 1950s ("Firth, when are you going to stop fooling around with that 'hill-billy music' and get serious?"). Now, the U. of W. School of Music has a classic guitar teacher on the staff—Michael Partington. I like to think I kicked a few bricks out of the wall back in the Fifties….

Hi, Anita! I've often wondered where you'd wandered off to.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: NW HOOT-new issue, PNW Folklore Society
From: GUEST,Anita Merando
Date: 28 May 15 - 07:10 AM

Hi Don Firth,
Yes, thought of you often. Perhaps there will be a NW trip this summer.
Anita


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