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Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?

GUEST,leeneia 18 Jun 15 - 11:31 AM
GUEST,leeneia 18 Jun 15 - 11:52 AM
Jack Campin 18 Jun 15 - 01:57 PM
Jack Campin 18 Jun 15 - 04:48 PM
GUEST,leeneia 18 Jun 15 - 09:18 PM
Monique 18 Jun 15 - 11:16 PM
GUEST,leeneia 19 Jun 15 - 11:01 AM
GUEST 04 Jul 16 - 09:18 PM
Felipa 05 Jul 16 - 06:25 AM
Felipa 05 Jul 16 - 06:31 AM
Felipa 05 Jul 16 - 06:46 AM
Felipa 05 Jul 16 - 06:55 AM
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Subject: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 11:31 AM

Last week I heard some people doing a song called 'L'aimante a La Grand'messe' (I think it means 'the Lovers at High Mass.')

I've found the piece on YouTube, performed by the band Tri Yann, which has been playing Breton music in France since the 1970's. Evidently they are big cheeses in the French folk scene.

If any of y'all have the CD or album, I would like to know what the band says about the origin and source of this song. It is said to be from the 1500's, but how do they know that?

It's got a great melody, and I've made a MIDI of it to play with my friends.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 11:52 AM

Here's the URL for it on YouTube -- beautiful for it's own sake. Have a listen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTIWtjSUOg0


I would like to know what the instrument is that sounds rather like a banjo.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 01:57 PM

The melody is most likely much more recent and much less traceable than the text. Breton music tends to use tunes interchangeably without naming them; this one sounds a lot like a lot of other Breton tunes.

This (from the sleeve notes?) implies it's a versified folk tale of mediaeval goliardic type but doesn't give a date:

http://claire.allenou.free.fr/Discographie/Albums/Urba.html


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 04:48 PM

There are a lot of synth instruments on that track, but the twangy thing sounds real. It's rather like an Afghan or Kashmiri rubab but without the sympathetic strings. Gut-strung fretless banjo?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 09:18 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll send the liner notes to my friend who is fluent in French.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: Monique
Date: 18 Jun 15 - 11:16 PM

I found this page but no recording seems to work. Maybe they can be asked.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 19 Jun 15 - 11:01 AM

Thank you for the link, Monique. It's interesting how many recordings of the song there are.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jul 16 - 09:18 PM

I wonder if anyone has found the score for L'Aimante de la Grande Messe? I have looked and been unable to find it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Jul 16 - 06:25 AM

Monique, that page you found looks like a good source in general for folk song from France; I must explore it some time
http://www.portaildupatrimoineoral.org/


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Subject: RE: Origins: Tri Yann's Urba album 'L'aimante...' ?
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Jul 16 - 06:31 AM

I searched web for "paroles" plus the song title and quickly saw a page https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Tri-Yann/L-aimante-%C3%A0-la-grand-messe with these lyrics (but no info re origin)

C'est un jeune homme de Carentoir, en faisant ses études,
Dans ses études a oublié les amours d'une brune,
La fille s'est lassée, a pris un homme marié.
Ah elle a pris un homme marié, pour aller avec elle,
C'est pour aller à Carentoir, pour entendre la messe.
En entrant dans l'église, proche du bénitieu,
Elle aperçut son bel aimant qui chantait la grand'messe,
Elle est tombée évanouie, parmi toute la presse.
Tout le monde la regarde, personne ne la connaît.
Il n'y a que son cher aimant qui chante la grand'messe,
Il est venu la relever parmi toute la presse: - Marie, ma p'tite Marie, qu'est-ce qui t'amène ici?
- Ce sont tes fausses promesses que tu m'avais promises.
Les fausses promesses qu'il lui avait faites sont dans la Sainte Eglise,
Il les a faites toutes à Dieu.
Adieu toutes les filles...
En entrant dans l'Eglise, il s'y est engagé,
En entrant dans l'Eglise, pour la vie est lié.


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Subject: Lyrics add: L'AIMANTE Á LA GRAND' MESSE -Tri Yann
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Jul 16 - 06:46 AM

http://claire.allenou.free.fr/Discographie/Albums/Urba.html already cited by Jack Campin

C'est l'histoire, traditionnelle dans toute l'Europe, du jeune homme qui oublie dans ses études en ville son amie restée seule au Pays.
Cette version ajoute une dimension religieuse, logique dans une Bretagne à forte tradition chrétienne : l'amant devient prêtre et la jeune fille le retrouve disant la messe. Dans le rêve qui suit son épanouissement, le profane et le sacré se mêlent, comme dans les Carmina Burana que colportaient de ville en ville, au Moyen-âge, les vagants, goliards et autres clercs en rupture de ban.

It says the story of the young man who forgets his studies [because of the attraction of women] is common all over Europe, but not always with the religious aspect of this song. The student enters the church, all is given to God, farewell to the women. I had to look up what a goliard is: " a wandering student of the 12th or 13th century given to the writing of satiric Latin verse and to convivial living and minstrelsy."

The lyrics are also at this site of Tri Yann album notes and I should have looked there first! Note that the Latin verse is explained (in French)

L'AIMANTE Á LA GRAND' MESSE

C'est un jeune homme de Carentoir, en faisant ses études,
Dans ses études a oublié les amours d'une brune,
La fille s'est lassée, a pris un homme marié.

Ah elle a pris un homme marié, pour aller avec elle,
C'est pour aller à Carentoir, pour entendre la messe.
En entrant dans l'église, proche du bénitier,

Elle aperçut son bel aimant qui chantait la grand'messe,
Elle est tombée évanouie, parmi toute la presse.

Ille mansit in urbae, ista mansit cum vaccis et porcis in medio pratorum.
Ille studens oblitus est eam et ill factus est ecclesiasticus,
Ista venit in urbis ecclesiam ubi missam cantabat ille,
Ista evanescens in urbis ecclesia ubi missam cantabat ille.

(Lui est resté en ville, elle dans les prés avec les vaches et les cochons.
Dans ses études, il l'a oubliée et s'est fait prêtre,.
Elle est venue dans l'église de la ville où il disait la messe et s'est évanouie.)

Tout le monde la regarde, personne ne la connaît.

Il n'y a que son cher aimant qui chante la grand'messe,
Il est venu la relever parmi toute la presse :
- Marie, ma p'tite Marie, qu'est-ce qui t'amène ici ?
- Ce sont tes fausses promesses que tu m'avais promises.

Les fausses promesses qu'il lui avait faites sont dans la Sainte Eglise,
Il les a faites toutes à Dieu. Adieu toutes les filles...
En entrant dans l'Eglise, il s'y est engagé,
En entrant dans l'Eglise, pour la vie est lié.


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Subject: correction re album notes above
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Jul 16 - 06:55 AM

oops, I mistranslated / wrote too quickly; the young man goes to study,forgetting/forsaking the woman he left behind

There are loads of songs of women forsaken, sometimes when men go off to sea or off to war, I didnt know there were many about men going off to study. Maybe not so much in English (all that comes to mind immediately is Lang a Growing/The Bonny Boy : "father oh father, if you see fit, we'll send my love to college for another year yet, And all around his college cap we'll bind a ribbon blue, to let the ladies know that he's married"

I can imagine it would be a shock if you didnt know your lost love had become a priest, to go into church and recognise him saying mass. And it could feel strange even if you did know.


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