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DTStudy: Bonny Dundee

DigiTrad:
BONNIE DUNDEE
BONNY DUNDEE 2
BONNY DUNDEE 2


Joe Offer 10 Jul 15 - 12:11 AM
Joe Offer 10 Jul 15 - 12:20 AM
Joe Offer 10 Jul 15 - 12:22 AM
Joe Offer 10 Jul 15 - 12:24 AM
Joe Offer 10 Jul 15 - 12:25 AM
Keith A of Hertford 10 Jul 15 - 04:33 AM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 06:04 AM
Jack Campin 10 Jul 15 - 06:47 AM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 10:55 AM
Rex 10 Jul 15 - 11:04 AM
GUEST 10 Jul 15 - 11:10 AM
GUEST 10 Jul 15 - 12:33 PM
Lighter 10 Jul 15 - 12:49 PM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 01:09 PM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 01:43 PM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 01:47 PM
meself 10 Jul 15 - 02:24 PM
Jack Campin 10 Jul 15 - 02:26 PM
GUEST,Alan Ross 10 Jul 15 - 04:14 PM
GUEST,Allan Conn 11 Jul 15 - 04:01 AM
LadyJean 11 Jul 15 - 11:25 PM
GUEST,Rossey 12 Jul 15 - 11:52 AM
Lighter 12 Jul 15 - 11:56 AM
GUEST,Allan Conn 13 Jul 15 - 02:11 AM
GUEST,Rossey 13 Jul 15 - 07:15 AM
Jack Campin 13 Jul 15 - 08:06 AM
GUEST,Rossey 13 Jul 15 - 10:48 AM
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Subject: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:11 AM

This is an edited DTStudy thread, and all messages posted here are subject to editing and deletion.
This thread is intended to serve as a forum for corrections and annotations for the Digital Tradition song named in the title of this thread.

Search for other DTStudy threads


The DT has three versions of this song, but I haven't seen any discussion. Guess it's time to sort this out.
Here's the first version we have in the Digital Tradition:

BONNIE DUNDEE

Tae the lairds i' convention t'was Claverhouse spoke
E'er the Kings crown go down, there'll be crowns to be broke;
Then let each cavalier who loves honour and me
Come follow the bonnet o' bonnie Dundee.

cho: Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can
Saddle my horses and call out my men
And it's Ho! for the west port and let us gae free,
And we'll follow the bonnets o' bonnie Dundee!

Dundee he is mounted, he rides doon the street,
The bells they ring backwards, the drums they are beat,
But the Provost, douce man, says "Just e'en let him be
For the toon is well rid of that de'il o' Dundee."

cho:

There are hills beyond Pentland and lands beyond Forth,
Be there lairds i' the south, there are chiefs i' the north!
There are brave duniewassals, three thousand times three
Will cry "Hoy!" for the bonnets o' bonnie Dundee.

cho:

Then awa' to the hills, to the lea, to the rocks
E'er I own a usurper, I'll couch wi' the fox!
Then tremble, false Whigs, in the midst o' your glee
Ye ha' no seen the last o' my bonnets and me.

@Scottish
filename[ DUNDEBON
TUNE FILE: DUNDEBON
CLICK TO PLAY
RG




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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:20 AM

...and the second DT version, which I think is displayed twice, as files 9572 and 9168

BONNY DUNDEE 2
(Sir Walter Scott)

To the Lords of Convention 'twas Claver'se who spoke.
"Ere the King's crown shall fall there are crowns to be broke;
So let each Cavalier who loves honour and me,
Come follow the bonnet of Bonny Dundee.

CHO: Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can,
Come saddle your horses, and call up your men;
Come open the West Port and let me gang free,
And it's room for the bonnets of Bonny Dundee!"

Dundee he is mounted, he rides up the street,
The bells are rung backward, the drums they are beat;
But the Provost, douce man, said, "Just e'en let him be,
The Gude Town is weel quit of that Deil of Dundee."

As he rode down the sanctified bends of the Bow,
Ilk carline was flyting and shaking her pow;
But the young plants of grace they looked couthie and slee,
Thinking luck to thy bonnet, thou Bonny Dundee!

With sour-featured Whigs the Grass-market was crammed,
As if half the West had set tryst to be hanged;
There was spite in each look, there was fear in each e'e,
As they watched for the bonnets of Bonny Dundee.

These cowls of Kilmarnock had spits and had spears,
And lang-hafted gullies to kill cavaliers;
But they shrunk to close-heads and the causeway was free,
At the toss of the bonnet of Bonny Dundee.

He spurred to the foot of the proud Castle rock,
And with the gay Gordon he gallantly spoke;
"Let Mons Meg and her marrows speak twa words or three,
For the love of the bonnet of Bonny Dundee."

The Gordon demands of him which way he goes-
"Where'er shall direct me the shade of Montrose!
Your Grace in short space shall hear tidings of me,
Or that low lies the bonnet of Bonny Dundee.

"There are hills beyond Pentland and lands beyond Forth,
If there's lords in the Lowlands, there's chiefs in the North;
There are wild Duniewassals three thousand times three,
Will cry hoigh! for the bonnet of Bonny Dundee.

"There's brass on the target of barkened bull-hide;
There's steel in the scabbard that dangles beside;
The brass shall be burnished, the steel shall flash free,
At the toss of the bonnet of Bonny Dundee.

"Away to the hills, to the caves, to the rocks-
Ere I own an usurper, I'll couch with the fox;
And tremble, false Whigs, in the midst of your glee,
You have not seen the last of my bonnet and me!"

He waved his proud hand, the trumpets were blown,
The kettle-drums clashed and the horsemen rode on,
Till on Ravelston's cliffs and on Clermiston's lee
Died away the wild war-notes of Bonny Dundee.

CHO: Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can,
Come saddle the horses, and call up the men,
Come open your gates, and let me gae free,
For it's up with the bonnets of Bonny Dundee!

The famous song, "Bonnie Dundee," celebrated an unavailing attempt
by John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee, to sway the Convention
called by William III in 1688 in Edinburgh to ratify his succession.
Despairing of carrying the vote and afraid of an attempt on his person,
he rode off at the head of his mounted followers, causing consternation
among the faint-hearted citizens. His departure had the effect of causing
many who favored his views to withdraw also and those who favored William
were left without opposition. Meanwhile, Dundee withdrew to the Highlands
and set about raising an army.

@Scottish @Scottish @historical
filename[ DUNDEBN2
TUNE FILE: DUNDEBN2
CLICK TO PLAY
WH


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:22 AM

....and the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

    Bonnie Dundee

    DESCRIPTION: "To the Lords of Convention 'twas Claverhouse spoke, Ere the King's crown go down there are crowns to be broke." The Jacobite army gathers and prepares to fight for James II and VII
    AUTHOR: unknown (adapted by Sir Walter Scott)
    EARLIEST DATE: 1862 (Cameron's Selection of Scottish Songs); believed to date to at least the eighteenth century
    KEYWORDS: soldier drink political Jacobite
    HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
    July 27, 1689 - Battle of Killiecrankie, at which Jacobites under Claverhouse/Dundee are victorious but their commander killed, resulting in the failure of their cause
    FOUND IN:
    REFERENCES (1 citation):
    ADDITIONAL: Michael Brander, _Scottish and Border Battles and Ballads_, 1975 (page references to the 1993 Barnes & Noble edition), p. 179, "Bonnie Dundee" (1 text)
    ST MBra179 (Partial)
    Roud #8513
    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "Riding a Raid" (tune)
    SAME TUNE:
    Riding a Raid (File: SCWF082)
    Scalp Song ("To the base churls of Congress 'twas Brooksy who spoke," referring to the attack on Senator Sumner by congressman Brooks, and attributed to Maria Jane Peytoun Middletonne Fitz-Fysshe, believed to be a pseudonym for George Templeton Strong) (Lawrence, p. 333)
    NOTES: The common version of this is by Sir Walter Scott, who published it in the play "The Doom of Devorgoil" (so, e.g., The Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition by Lewis Carroll wth Introduction and Notes by Martin Gardner, W. W. Norton, 2000, p. 260, n. 13), but there is enough variation in the publications that I am not entirely convinced that Scott originated it.
    It is certain that Charles Dodgson/Lewis Carroll rewrote it for Through the Looking Glass, Chapter IX, "Queen Alice," where it bcomes a poem that begins
    To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said
    "I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head.
    Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be
    Come dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen and Me!" - RBW
    Last updated in version 3.5
    File: MBra179

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Song List

    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2015 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:24 AM

...and a nice post from Wolfgang:
    Thread #1959   Message #7060
    Posted By: Wolfgang Hell
    19-Jun-97 - 10:46 AM
    Thread Name: Lyr Req: Edinburgh songs
    Subject: Lyr Add: BONNIE DUNDEE^^

    Bonnie Dundee

    To the Lords of Convention, 'twas Clverhouse spoke,
    "Ere the King's criwn goes down, there are hearts to be broke.
    Let each cavalier here who loves honor and me,
    Come follow the bonnets of Bonnie Dundee!"

    [chorus]
    Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can.
    Saddle my horse and call out my men.
    Unlatch the west port and let us go free,
    For it's up with the bonnets of Bonnie Dundee!

    Dundee he is mounted he rides down the street,
    The bells they ring backwards, the drums they do beat.
    But the provost (douce man) said, "Just e'en let if be,
    For the town is well rid of that devil Dundee!"

    [chorus]

    As he rode down the sanctified bends of the Bow,
    Ilk carline was flirting and shakin' her pow
    But the young sprigs o'grace were looking coothie and sly
    Thinking, "Luck to your bonnet, my Bonnie Dundee!"

    [chorus]

    With sour-face-d Whigs the Grassmarket was crammed,
    As if half the West had set tryst to be hanged;
    There was spite in each look, there was fear in each eye,
    As they watched for the bonnets of Bonnie Dundee

    [chorus]

    Those cowards of Kilmarnoc had spits and had spears,
    And long-hafted gullies to kill cavaliers,
    But they shrunk to their doorways and the causeway was free,
    At the toss of the bonnet of Bonnie Dundee!

    [chorus]

    He spurred to the foot of the proud castle rock,
    And with the brave Gordon he gallantly spok,
    "Let Mons Meg and her marrows speak two words or three,
    For the love of the bonnet of Bonnie Dundee!"

    [chorius]

    The Gordon demands of him which way he goes,
    "Where-er shall direct me the shade of Montrose!
    Your grace in short space shall hear tidings of me,
    Or that low lies the bonnet of Bonnie Dundee!"

    [chorus]

    There are hills beyond Pentland and lands beyond Forth.
    If there's lords in the Lowlands, there's chiefs in the north;
    There are bonnie Duniewassals three thousand times three,
    Who'll shout "Hoigh! for the bonnets of Bonnie Dundee!"

    [chorus]

    Then away to the hills, to the lea, to the rocks,
    Ere I own a usurper I'll crouch with the fox.
    And tremble you traitors in the midst of your glee,
    For you've not seen the last of me bonnets and me!

    [chorus]

    There is brass on the target of barkened bull hide;
    There is steel in the scabbard that dangles beside.
    The brass shall be burnished and the steel shall flash free
    At a toss of the bonnet of Bonnie Dundee!

    [chorus]

    He waved his proud hand and the trumpets were blown;
    The kettle drums clashed and the horsemen rode on
    'Til on Ravelstone's Cliffs and on Clermiston's Lea
    Died away the wild war notes of Bonnie Dundee

    [chorus]

    Historical note: "The famous song, 'Bonnie Dundee', celebrated an unavailing attempt by John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee, to sway the Convention called by William III in 1688 in Edinburgh to ratify his succession. Despairing of carrying the vote and afraid of an attempt on his person, he rode off at the head of his mounted followers, causing consternation among the faint-hearted citizens. His departure had the effect of causing many who favored his views to withdraw also and those who favored William were left without opposition. Meanwhile, Dundee withdrew to the Highlands and set about raising an army."

    From Scottish & Border Battles & Ballads

    Just "copy & paste"d down from:

    http://www.ici.net/cust_pages/dundee/bonnie_d.htm

    Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:25 AM

...and look at this one:
    Thread #1959   Message #899756
    Posted By: IanC
    27-Feb-03 - 12:17 PM
    Thread Name: Lyr Req: Edinburgh songs
    Subject: RE: lyr add: Parody of Bonnie Dundee

    Just an additional note on "Bonnie Dundee", as it doesn't seem to have any attribution in DT.

    The song was originally included in the play "The Doom of Devorgoil - A Melodrama" (1830) by Sir Walter Scott. There is no particular evidence as to whether he wrote it or not, but his appears to be the earliest version of the song, so it is probable that he did (Scott wrote quite a few "folk songs").

    There have been many parodies of "Bonnie Dundee" but one of the best must be by Lewis Carroll (1871) in "Through The Looking Glass (and what Alice found there)"

    To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said
    "I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head.
    Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be
    Come dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen and Me!"

    Then fill up the glasses as quick as you can,
    And sprinkle the table with buttons and bran:
    Put cats in the coffee, and mice in the tea--
    And welcome Queen Alice with thirty-times-three!

    "O Looking-Glass creatures," quoth Alice, "draw near!
    'Tis and honour to see me, a favour to ear:
    'Tis a privilege high to have dinner and tea
    Along with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and Me!"

    Then fill up the glasses with treacle and ink,
    Or anything else that is pleasant to drink:
    Mix sand with the cider, and wool with the wine--
    And welcome Queen Alice with ninety-times-nine!


    :-)


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 04:33 AM

From Wiki,

John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount Dundee (c. 21 July 1648 – 27 July 1689), known as the 7th Laird of Claverhouse until raised to the viscountcy in 1688, was a Scottish soldier and nobleman, a Tory and an Episcopalian. Claverhouse was responsible for policing south-west Scotland during and after the religious unrest and rebellion of the 1670s and 80s. After his death, Presbyterian historians dubbed him "Bluidy Clavers". Contemporary evidence for the fairness of this soubriquet in the Covenanting tradition is mixed. Tales of the Covenanters and Covenanter monuments hold Claverhouse directly responsible for the deaths of adherents of that movement. However, Claverhouse's own letters frequently recommended lenient treatment of Covenanters,[1] and in 1684 he married into a prominent Covenanter family. Later, as a general in the Scottish army, Claverhouse remained loyal to King James VII of Scotland after the Revolution of 1688. He rallied those Highland clans loyal to the Jacobite cause and, although he lost his life in the battle, led them to victory at Killiecrankie. This first Jacobite rising was unsuccessful, but Claverhouse became a Jacobite hero, acquiring his second soubriquet "Bonnie Dundee".


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 06:04 AM

This is an excerpt from a 1908 political election parody, which starts off quite cleverly, but then struggles to fit...

"To the Dundee Electors 'twas Winston broke forth,
my loss in the South is your gain in the North.
So let every man here, who loves Fair Trad and ME,
up an' win a new glory for Bonnie Dundee

Come fill up your posters, come fill up your walls.
Call out your crowds and open your halls;
For with Free Trade an' government, big-wigs an' ME
You'll have something to mind on in Bonnie Dundee....
M.A.Y.

Presumably Winston is Winston Churchill. The parody was published on the front of a Dundee newspaper.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Jack Campin
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 06:47 AM

"spoke" rather than "broke" surely?

BTW Scott didn't have the now-familiar tune in mind - he was pastiching older songs to the tune "Bonny Dundee" (as found in the Skene MS of the early 17th century). "The Lords of Convention" tune dates from the 1840s; it's from a piano salon piece, "The band in the distance". Scott himself was almost tone-deaf and may not have noticed the difference between them.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 10:55 AM

by 'broke forth' the politician is talking about Winston or his party having at some stage taken government seats in the South, and that the writer having lost out down South, was hoping to take Dundee in the North with their assistance! I interpret it as 'their loss would be Dundee's gain'. I don't know much about politics in the 1900's, so don't know the background.   However, the writer was using a 'locally' focused song. He then turned it to a new political use, in a witty way by appealing directly to the natives (yet only gives initials at the bottom, very odd).

There are several other verses, but I thought it was a good example of parody for propaganda. I just came across it looking through old newspapers.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Rex
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 11:04 AM

I am pleased to see this noble song getting some worthy attention. It's tune appears in many parodies through the years.

Rex


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 11:10 AM

There's loads of stuff about the whole song history on WIKI!

Back to the parody...

I just found out that Winston Churchill was appointed as head of a Government post at the Board of Trade in April 1908. And the writer of the parody keeps on about 'Free Trade'.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:33 PM

The Dundee by-election, 1908


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Lighter
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 12:49 PM

An imitation called "Riding a Raid," concerning General Stuart's Confederate cavalry, was apparently sung in 1863. The author is unknown.

http://tinyurl.com/p3gw2lu


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 01:09 PM

Thanks to whoever linked the Dundee by-election story. Churchill did stand for Dundee and its all interconnected with that. I still can't think of who individually placed the song, but it shows my complete ignorance of Scottish political history and the significance of 'Free' Trade and industry in the Dundee area. It only becomes clear if you read the linked piece. From a simple parody there is a heap of meaning, that is lost unless you know the background.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 01:43 PM

After re-reading the original newspaper c/w the link on the history of the by-election and a look at the punctuation used has changed my whole interpretation of what the parody means. And M.A.Y. refers to the month all this took place.   I was completely wrong! Broke forth is another way of saying Spoke forth.. and direct speech follows. Punctuation changes everything! It seems to be subtle sarcasm against Churchill and his ego (is that right?)

I reproduce it in full:

Bonnie Dundee:

To the Dundee Elector 'twas Winston broke forth -
"My loss in the South is your gain in the North!
So let every man here who loves free trade and ME.
Up an' win a new glory for Bonnie Dundee!

"Come fill up your posters, come fill up your walls;
come call out your crowds an' throw open your halls;
For Free Trade an' Government big-wigs an' ME;
You'll have something to "mind on" in Bonnie Dundee;"

"I've seen many a land an' met many a foe.
I've looked death in the face an' let everyone know.
And at stately St. Stephen's I've made things to hum.
But they're nought to my daring in sessions to come!"

"come fill up" & c.

"And then when at last I've become really great.
And I'm leading the party as Chief of the state.
In whatever camp I may happen to be.
You'll be proud that I once sat for Dundee".

M.A.Y.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 01:47 PM

Oops I missed the last 'Bonnie' in Bonnie Dundee. Bad typing!


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: meself
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 02:24 PM

'It seems to be subtle sarcasm against Churchill and his ego (is that right?)'

I'd say that's right. And it is witty. The 'whatever camp' business would be referring to Churchill's history of changing parties.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Jack Campin
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 02:26 PM

It took a few years, but the Dundee voters finally picked a decent human being when E.D. Morel beat Churchill in 1922.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._D._Morel


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Alan Ross
Date: 10 Jul 15 - 04:14 PM

Sorry for having hijacked the original subject, but I literally had just found the political parody today, after looking at the topic, which is why I hadn't fully read it.

But it shows the potency of the use of the work in Scotland. Even the 'original' which it parodies had references to 'Whigs', and wittily the author uses the pun on big-wigs, and along the way has a pop at Churchill's military reputation! Would they have called him an old 'blaw haird' in some regions?

Anyway, that is all...   

I think I'll adapt it for Donald Trump.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Allan Conn
Date: 11 Jul 15 - 04:01 AM

re the Wiki page on Claverhouse. I often feel that how Scottish history is viewed is warped by later prejudices. That being both the way the Royalists/Jacobite/Episcopalians were glamourised by the likes of Scott and Hogg etc - and the lack of later self pitying by the ultimately winning Covenanting/Williamite/Presbyterian site. People like Montrose and Dundee were just as much war criminals as any Scots on the other side. Montrose is remembered for his great campaign whilst the massacre of the citizens of Aberdeen in now largely ignored - as are the massacres of non combatants in Campbell country carried out by his MacDonald allies.

Likewise the so called "Killing Times" in southern Scotland were real enough and Claverhouse was a leading figure in this oppression. Yes he was married into a Covenanting family but that was not unusual in Scotland at that time. I imagine normally he would be giving the orders rather than getting his hands dirty but he also seemingly was not averse to murdering people with his own hands too. The preacher John Brown of Priesthill was interrogated in front of his wife, daughter and baby son and refused to swear the oath of allegiance. He was thrown to the ground and told to prepare to die but Claverhouse agreed to let him say a last prayer first. However he was soon bellowing at the unfortunate saying he had permission to pray not to preach. He then ordered his troops to shoot the preacher but they either refused, or were just too hesitant, perhaps because this was all in front of the womenfolk. Claverhouse is said to have grabbed a weapon and shot Brown himself. Brown's wife grabbed the body in her arms and Claverhouse supposedly leaned down and said to her something like "what think you of your husband now woman?" to which she replied "I aye thought muckle of him but now more ever". Claverhouse's own letters admit that Brown was summarily executed though he states that the preacher "suffered very unconcernedly"

Re the events themselves in the song. When James VII fled England in the wake of William's invasion he lost his power base. This enabled the Prsbyterians to reassert themselves in Scotland. However the Scottish parliament did not just depose James. They asked both James and William & Mary to put forward their case. William put his forward with his letter being conciliatory and agreeing that he and his wife would accept some restrictions on the royal powers etc. James simply said that he was monarch by divine right and that no-one had the right to question him etc. The Scottish Parliament by a large majority decided to offer the Crown of Scotland to William and Mary and James was deposed and branded a traitor. Claverhouse was seemingly the only major figure to openly stand by James hence his exit from the city described in the song. He probably though had no choice in doing that. As the major henchman he would be seen as a marked man by many.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: LadyJean
Date: 11 Jul 15 - 11:25 PM

A band playing at the Ligoneir Highland Games some years ago, added a chorus, "I ride with the devil. I ride with the devil. I ride with the devil. The devil Dundee."
It added nothing to the song. But, a small girl who had hopped up on the stage, and was dancing would first mime riding, then put her fingers up beside her head, to imitate the devil's horns. Though she looked rather more like she was trying to be a bunny.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Rossey
Date: 12 Jul 15 - 11:52 AM

It's funny what started off as a music/poetry and theatre work by Scott - ended up being a 'Rabble Rouser' of the Scottish folk repertoire when played with an adapted tune, by mostly guitar backed folk groups. Songs for drunken or high spirited audiences everywhere!

Bonnie Dundee, Flower of Scotland, Killiecrankie, Twa' Recruiting Sergeants, Gallant Forty Twa' - in a rock form, Loch Lomond... Driving rhythm and choruses that audiences latch on to.

Ironically the Auld Scots used and the historical lyrics of Bonnie Dundee are so archaic, that 99.99 percent of ordinary people its sung to won't have a clue what any of it means - but we all love the sing a long chorus.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Lighter
Date: 12 Jul 15 - 11:56 AM

Starring Tobey Macguire, "Ride with the Devil" was a very fine American western of 1999.

Coincidence?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Allan Conn
Date: 13 Jul 15 - 02:11 AM

I don't think there is much to get your head round lyrically. Certainly in the version normally sung now - (ie as by The Corries in their 4 verses and chorus) then no more than two or three words in the whole song that a modern Scottish audience might need to look up!


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Rossey
Date: 13 Jul 15 - 07:15 AM

I doubt very much if you ask anybody from the ordinary public or foreign nationality if they know what the song is about today. Dunniewassals, Lea, Whigs, unhook the west port.. it is self-explanatory if you have a historical knowledge.   But it is the sing-along chorus that transcends the meaning.   How many people truly get what following the Bonnets actually means and its political background its just a rollicking good song.

How about a rap version?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: Jack Campin
Date: 13 Jul 15 - 08:06 AM

Does rap ever do 6/8?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Bonny Dundee
From: GUEST,Rossey
Date: 13 Jul 15 - 10:48 AM

I was only jesting. I did though see a guy on TV who claimed he could create a rap from almost any kind of work if it's got good words, changing the rhythm and ignoring the tune. Not my scene.


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