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Lyr Add: The Rest of the Day's Your Own

DigiTrad:
THE FARMER'S BOY
THE FARMER'S BOY (2)
THE REST OF THE DAY
THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN


Related threads:
Lyr Req: farmers boy (15)
Req: please help with finding a song-Farmers Boy (4)
Lyr Req: The Rest of the Day's Your Own (8)
(origins) Origins: Farmer's Boy (the) (34)
Tune Req: The Farmer's Boy (8)
Lyr Req: The Farmer's Boy (9)


wildlone 04 Dec 99 - 03:26 PM
McGrath of Harlow 04 Dec 99 - 08:13 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Dec 99 - 08:12 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Dec 99 - 09:13 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Nov 11 - 12:09 AM
Joe Offer 25 Nov 11 - 01:13 AM
Joe Offer 25 Nov 11 - 01:57 AM
GUEST,Fantum 26 Nov 11 - 07:56 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN
From: wildlone
Date: 04 Dec 99 - 03:26 PM

A Music Hall song from the singing of Jack Lane 1915.


One day when I was out of work a job I went to seek,
To be a farmer's boy.
At last I found an easy job at half-a-crown a week,
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer said, "I think I've got the very job for you.
Your duties will be light for this is all you've got to do:

Rise at three every morn,
Milk the cow with the crumpled horn,
Feed the pigs, clean the sty,
Teach the pigeons the way to fly,
Plough the fields, mow the hay,
Help the cocks and hens to lay,
Sow the seed, tend the crops,
Chase the flies from the turnip tops,
Clean the knives, black the shoes,
Scrub the kitchen and sweep the flues,
Help the wife wash the pots,
Grow the cabbages and carrots,
Make the beds, dust the coals, mend the gramophone,
And if there’s no more work to do, the rest of the day's your own."

I scratched my head and thought it would be absolutely fine
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer said, "Of course you'll have to do some overtime
When you're a farmers boy."
Said he: "The duties that I have given you you'll be quickly through,
So I’ve been thinking of a few more things that you can do:

Skim the milk, make the cheese,
Chop the meat for the sausage-es
Bath the kids, mend their clothes,
Use your dial to scare the crows,
In the milk put the chalk,
Shave the knobs of the pickled pork,
Shoe the horse, break the coal,
Take the cat for his midnight stroll,
Cook the food, scrub the stairs,
Teach the parrot to say his prayers,
Roast the joint, bake the bread,
Shake the feathers up in the bed,
When the wife has the gout, rub her funny bone,
And then if there’s no more work to do, the rest of the day's your own."

I thought is was a shame to take the money, you can bet,
To be a farmers boy,
And so I wrote my duties down in case I might forget.
I was a farmer's boy.
It took all night to write 'em down, didn't go to bed,
But somehow I got all mixed up and this is how they read:

Rise at three every morn,
Milk the hen with the crumpled horn,
Scrub the wife every day,
Teach the nanny goat to lay,
Shave the cat, mend the cheese,
Fit the tights on the sausage-es,
Bath the pigs, break the pots,
Boil the kids with a few carrots,
Roast the horse, dust the bread,
Put the cocks and the hens to bed,
Boots and shoes, black with chalk,
Shave the hair on the pickled pork.
All the rest I forgot; somehow it had flown,
But I got the sack this morning so the rest of my life's my own.


Taken from the book "The Song and the Story: Songs of Isla St Clair.”


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Days Your Own
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 04 Dec 99 - 08:13 PM

Thanks - I've heard Isla sing it, and Cosmotheka as well do it beautifully. Should be in the Digital Tradition, and I imagine it soon will be now you've posted it - it'd make number 18 in the list of music hall songs in the DT. ("Browse by keywords" under Digitrad Links up at the top of the page).

But 18 only makes a tiny dent in the back catalogue of music hall songs, (and the best are definitely Public Domain by now). So does anyone know of a site with a more wideranging collection? There should be one - after all the best music hall songs are now in the public domain.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Days Your Own
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Dec 99 - 08:12 PM

I'd put it in the Digital Tradition, but it's already there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Days Your Own
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Dec 99 - 09:13 PM

And of course it is, now I look - "it" normally is, I've found.

Where I went wrong this time was that with a keyword search on "musichall", it didn't show up. (No 4 entry is a blank, so maybe that's where it should be?)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Day's Your Own
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Nov 11 - 12:09 AM

Oxford University, the British Library, and the National Library of Australia have the sheet music, described thus:

THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN
Written and composed by Worton David and J.P. Long ; sung by Jack Lane.
London : Francis, Day & Hunter, ©1915.

First line: One day when I was out of work a job I went to seek.

[Note this contradicts the DT, which says Jack Lane wrote it.]


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Subject: DT Corr: The Rest of the Day's Your Own
From: Joe Offer
Date: 25 Nov 11 - 01:13 AM

Jim, is the sheet music available for viewing?

There are two transcriptions in the Digital Tradition. I think this one is the better one: http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6891 - filename[ RESTDAY

The one line I question is "tune the Gramophone" - "mend the Gramophone" from the other version makes more sense, and that's what's in the recording I found. Oh, and I think it should be "boil the kids" in the third verse.

The other transcription is almost the same, but has many more errors: http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8434.


I found the song on a wonderful Musical Traditions CD, Just Another Saturday Night - Sussex 1960 (MT CD 309-10). Here are the lyrics and notes from the Musical Traditions Website, with my corrections and Digital Tradition formatting:

16 The Rest of the Day is Your Own (sung by Cyril Philips) (Roud 1485)
(Recorded on 18.2.60 at The Cherry Tree, Copthorne)

THE REST OF THE DAY IS YOUR OWN
(Worton David and J.P. Long)

One day when I was out of work a job I went to seek
To be a farmer's boy.
At last I found an easy job at half a crown a week,
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer said, "I think I got the very job for you.
Your duties will be light and this is all you'll have to do...

"Rise at three, every morn,
Milk the cow with the crumpled horn,
Feed the pig, clean the sty,
Teach the pigeons the way to fly,
Plough the field, mow the hay,
Help the cocks and hens to lay,
Sow the seeds, tend the crops,
Chase the flies from the turnip tops,
Clean the knives, black the shoes,
Dust the kitchen and sweep the flue,
Help the wife, wash the pots,
Grow the cabbages and car-rots,
Make the beds, dust the coal,
Mend the gramophone...
Then, if there's no more work to do...
The rest of the day is your own."

I scratched me head and thought it would be absolutely prime
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer said, "Of course, you'll have to do some overtime
When you're a farmer's boy."
Said he, "The duties that I've given you, you'll be quickly through,
So I've been thinking up a few more jobs that you can do...

"Skim the milk, make the cheese,
Chop the meat for the sausage-ees,
Bath the kids, mend their clothes,
Use your dial to scare the crows,
In the milk put the chalk,
Shave the hairs on the pickled pork,
Shoe the horse, rake the coal,
Take the cat for his midnight stroll,
Cook the food, scrub the stairs,
Teach the parrot to say his prayers,
When the wife's got the gout,
Rub her funny-bone...
Then, if there's no more work to do...
The rest of the day is your own."

I thought it was a shame to take the money, you can bet,
To be a farmer's boy,
And so I wrote me duties down In case I should forget
I was a farmer's boy.
It took all night to write them down—I didn't go to bed—
And somehow I've got all mixed up and this is how they read...

"Rise at three every morn,
Milk the hen with the crumpled horn,
Scrub the wife every day,
Teach the nanny-goat how to lay,
Shave the cat, mend the cheese,
Fit the tights on the sausage-ees,
Bath the pigs, break the pots,
Boil the kids with a few car-rots,
Roast the horse, dust the bread,
Put the cocks and hens to bed,
Boots and shoes black with chalk,
Shave the knobs on the pickled pork...
All the rest I have forgot,
For somehow it has flown,
But I got the sack this morning so...
The rest of my life is my own.


Cyril considered this "the oldest song in my repertoire ... a song about a boy working on a farm. A man named Kemp Scott used to sing it at the village smoking concerts in the twenties. He was a good entertainer and I remember him from Eastbourne."

Of course, it's not old at all - as usually seems to be the case when a singer says something of this sort. It was written in 1915 by David & Long, and sung on the halls, and recorded, by Jack Lane - which is probably where Kemp Scott heard it. Jack Lane recorded this song on Regal-G7032 in 1915, but only two verses. Cyril's version is almost exactly the same as the sheet-music. The other side of Jack's record is Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?

THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN
Written and composed by Worton David and J.P. Long; sung by Jack Lane.
London: Francis, Day & Hunter, ©1915.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Day's Your Own
From: Joe Offer
Date: 25 Nov 11 - 01:57 AM

The Papers Past Website in New Zealand has a clipping of the lyrics to this song, published in the Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XIII, Issue 644, 9 October 1917, Page 1


The following is taken from "The Karere," or "The Message," compiled by members of the Twenty-eighth Reinforcements on their voyage home:

THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN
or, A Farmer's Boy

(by Private F.N. Dickie)

One day when I was out of work, a job I went to seek
To be a farmer's boy.
At last I found an easy job at a half-a-crown a week,
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer said 'I think I've got the very job for you,
Your duties will be light, for this is all you've got to do:
(Chant)
Rise at three every morn,
Milk the cow with the crumpled horn;
Feed the pigs, clean the sty,
Teach the pigeons the way to fly;
Plough the fields, mow the hay,
Sow the seed, tend the crops,
Chase the flies from the turnip tops,
Clean the knives, black the shoes,
Scrub the kitchen and clean the flues,
Help the wife wash the pots,
Grow the cabbages and carrots.
Make the beds, dust the coats,
Tune the gramophone -
And then if there's no more work to do,
The rest of the day's your own.'

I scratched my head and thought it would be absolutely prime
To be a farmer's boy.
The farmer says, 'Of course you will have to do some overtime
When you're a farmer's boy.'
Said he, 'The duties that I've given you, you'll be quickly through,
So I've been thinking of a few more things that you can do":
(Chant)
Skim the milk, make the cheese,
Chop the meat for the sausages,
Bath the kids, mend the clothes,
Use your dial to scare the crows;
In the milk put the chalk,
Shave the knobs off the pickled pork;
Shoe the horse, break the coal,
Take the cat for its midnight stroll;
Cook the food, scrub the stairs,
Teach the parrot to say his prayers,
Roast the joint, bake the bread,
Shake the feathers up in the bed;
When the wife's got the gout,
Rub her funny-bone,
And then if there's no more work to do -
The rest of the day's your own.

I thought it was a shame to take his money, you can bet
To be a farmer's boy.
And so I wrote my duties down in case I should forget
I was a farmer's boy.
It took me all night to write them down, I didn't go to bed,
But somehow I got all mixed up, and this is how they read:
(Chant)
Rise at three every morn,
Milk the hen with the crumpled horn;
Scrub the wife every day,
Teach the nanny-goat how to lay;
Shave the cat, tune the cheese,
Fit the tights on the sausages;
Bath the pigs, break the pots,
Boil the kids with a few carrots,
Roast the horse, dust the bread,
Put the cocks and the hens to bed;
Boots and shoes, black with chalk,
Shave the hair off the pickled pork,
All the rest I've forgot,
Somehow it had flown,
But I got the sack this morning,
So the rest of my life's my own.


This version is almost the same as the RESTDAY version in the DT, but it fixes a number of problems I had with the DT lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Rest of the Day's Your Own
From: GUEST,Fantum
Date: 26 Nov 11 - 07:56 PM

Here are two sites with lyrics picked out of google.

bob@londonbobby.ca

http://www.trasksdad.com/MusicHall

I to am on the lookout for music hall songs and I have had little luck with lyrics on the web. So McGrath of Harlow you are not alone in being puzzled as to where all this material is.

Fantum


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