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BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016

GUEST,henryp 19 Jan 16 - 07:04 AM
GUEST 19 Jan 16 - 07:47 AM
Keith A of Hertford 19 Jan 16 - 12:42 PM
GUEST 19 Jan 16 - 01:23 PM
GUEST,henryp 19 Jan 16 - 08:02 PM
GUEST,henryp 23 Jan 16 - 01:42 PM
GUEST,henryp 23 Jan 16 - 02:31 PM
GUEST,henryp 23 Jan 16 - 03:17 PM
Steve Gardham 23 Jan 16 - 04:00 PM
GUEST,henryp 23 Jan 16 - 05:38 PM
Steve Gardham 23 Jan 16 - 06:02 PM
Bonzo3legs 24 Jan 16 - 05:45 AM
Bonzo3legs 24 Jan 16 - 08:01 AM
GUEST,Willa 24 Jan 16 - 09:49 AM
GUEST,henryp 24 Jan 16 - 02:30 PM
Bonzo3legs 24 Jan 16 - 05:07 PM
GUEST,henryp 25 Jan 16 - 08:04 AM
GUEST,henryp 25 Jan 16 - 08:10 AM
GUEST,henryp 26 Jan 16 - 07:17 AM
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Subject: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 19 Jan 16 - 07:04 AM

Another week of folk treats on BBC Radio, with two appearances by the shockingly good duo Nancy Kerr and James Fagan!

Saturday 23 January
Radio 3 1:00pm Saturday Classics Kathryn Tickell, chooses her classical favourites
Sunday 24 January
Radio 2 11:00am Weekend Wogan with live session from Kimmie Rhodes, and Irish musical duo Foster and Allen
Radio 3 12:00 noon Private Passions with Baaba Maal
Monday 25 January
Radio 2 7:00pm Celtic Connections Barbara Dickson, Julie Fowlis, Kris Drever
Tuesday 26 January
Radio 3 10:00am Liz Lochhead chooses her favourite classical music
Radio 3 10:30am Music in Time Classical pieces inspired by folk music
Radio 2 7:00pm Celtic Connections Gretchen Peters, Rhiannon Giddens, Teddy Thompson
Radio 2 11:00pm The People's Songs 4/50 Skiffle and blues

***Radio 3 11:00pm Late Junction Verity Sharp with Nancy and James live in the studio to share the music that has inspired them over their 20-year career to date
Wednesday 27 January
BBC 6 Music 10:00am Lauren Laverne with a live session by folk stars the Wainwright Sisters Martha and Lucy
Radio 2 7:00pm The Folk Show Daimh and highlights from Celtic Connections
Radio 3 11:00pm Late Junction Leveret - Harbron/Sweeney/Cutting - play live in the studio
Thursday 28 January
Radio 2 7:00pm Bob Harris Country Live session from Ashley Monroe
Radio 3 11:00pm Late Junction Music from Solomon Islands, Mali and Iceland plus early music from the Society of Strange and Ancient Instruments
Friday 29 January
Radio 3 10:00 Liz Lochhead - again
Radio 3 10:30 Music in Time Delius's Brigg Fair
(My grandparents were living in Brigg when Percy Grainger arrived there in 1905; they could easily have attended the Folk Song Competition. See following programme too)

***2:00pm Afternoon on 3 leading up to Folk Connections weekend
Nancy and James recorded with the BBC Concert Orchestra at Chichester Festival Theatre in November, and including Nancy singing Fol the Day, just like a Joseph Taylor melody!
Radio 3 4:30pm In Tune Live from Cecil Sharp House with Rosie Hood, Emily Portman and Belshazzar's Feast
Radio 3 11:00pm World on 3 from Celtic Connections with Calan, Bella Hardy and Afro Celt Sound System

BBC folk broadcasts


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Jan 16 - 07:47 AM

Brilliant. Thanks henryp.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 19 Jan 16 - 12:42 PM

Did anyone else catch this today?

The folk singer Eliza Carthy visits Chetham's Library in Manchester to find out about nineteenth century broadside ballads, and to see if she can find a new song to perform. She is joined by Andrew Biswell, Professor of English at Manchester Metropolitan University, who is an advocate of the cultural value of the ballads, which were printed on a single sheet and sold on the streets of Manchester. She meets Michael Powell, Librarian of Chetham's Library, which is one of the oldest public libraries in the English-speaking world, and he tells her more about the collections of ballads there. Many of the ballads reflect the Irish community in Manchester and she goes to the site of Little Ireland with Professor Brian Maidment to find out more about the conditions there. Eliza also has a go at printing a ballad herself, with help from Graham Moss at the Incline Press in Oldham. She talks to Jennifer Reid, the self-styled 'pre-eminent broadside balladress of the Manchester region', who has collaborated with the artist Jeremy Deller. Jennifer and Jeremy describe their work on his exhibition at the recent Venice Biennale which includes some of the ballads. Eliza asks her guests about their favourites then chooses one of her own to sing.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06fkm2g


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Jan 16 - 01:23 PM

And an advance warning for Between The Ears : 'Return To Brigg Fair' on BBC Radio 3, Sat 30th, 9:30pm.

"Musician Jim Moray uses sophisticated modern technology to bend sound and time to recreate the remarkable story surrounding an orchestral premiere which marked a turning point in the history of both folk music and recorded song.

In 1906 the composer Percy Grainger visited Brigg in Lincolnshire to record, for the very first time, the songs of traditional folk singers on a wax cylinder machine. Among his subjects was the 74 year old farm bailiff Joseph Taylor who was later invited to attend the London premiere of Delius' An English Rhapsody which had been inspired by the old man's rendition of Brigg Fair. When he heard the familiar tune, Taylor was said to have removed his hat and sang along encouraged by Delius and Grainger.
This programme follows Jim Moray as he experiments with technology to recreate that moment; bringing the voice of Joseph Taylor and the Delius orchestra work back together for the first time in over 100 years. Moray takes the original fragile and scratchy recording, restores the sound and then synthesises Taylor's voice in order to play it like an instrument in time with the orchestra.

Moray's technical experiment runs in parallel with his exploration of the significance of Percy Grainger encounter with Joseph Taylor, tracing the story back to Brigg in Lincolnshire and exploring the impact of those early field recordings on the history of recorded song in general and on folk music in particular. Applying the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics, he asks if folk music is fundamentally altered by the act of recording it?"


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 19 Jan 16 - 08:02 PM

Roy Palmer - with Harvey Kershaw - published a collection of Manchester Ballads in 1983.

Jeremy Deller called on Roy to learn about working class songs. His exhibition included a jukebox with specially made discs of industrial noises and Roy Palmer singing folk songs. Jeremy invited Roy and Pat Palmer to the opening of his exhibition in Manchester.

Jeremy also found a tea towel printed with Rules of the Mill hanging in Roy's downstairs loo. He said; I must have that for my exhibition! In fact, he borrowed an original poster from the Harris Museum in Preston. The adjoining Harris Library is home to the collection of Harkness broadsheets.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 01:42 PM

Tuesday 26 February 9:00pm BBC Radio 1
Is Protest Music Dead? Jamie Mac Coll investigates
Jamie MacColl - grandson of Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger - explores who is still making such songs


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 02:31 PM

Thursday 28 February 7:30pm BBC Radio3
Radio 3 In Concert BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
recorded at Celtic Connections at the weekend

7:30 Liam O'Flynn, with his colleagues Arty McGlynn and Rod McVey,
performs from his orchestrated repertoire including
The Brendan Voyage by Shaun Davey (excerpts)

8:30 Bela Fleck performs his own The Imposter Banjo Concerto,
commissioned by the Nashville Symphony and premiered in 2011


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 03:17 PM

And there's still more!

Thursday 28 January 2:00pm BBC Radio 3 Afternoon on 3

Gustav Holst is not well-known for his operas, so there's a welcome opportunity to hear his one-act At the Boar's Head on Thursday. Philip Langridge and John Tomlinson lead the cast as Prince Hal and Falstaff respectively, in this tale inspired by the works of Shakespeare and John Playford's treatise on folk dance, The English Dancing Master.

David Atherton conducts, with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, and it all looks forward to Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend. Thursday also features Marin Alsop conducting Tchaikovsky's Symphony no.5 with the BBC SO, and the Costa Rican conductor Giancarlo Guerrero conducting Argentinian music by Astor Piazzolla in our continuing Southern Hemisphere season.

Friday 29 January 2:00pm BBC Radio 3 Afternoon on 3

Penny Gore pre-empts Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend again on Friday, with a concert recorded in November at Chichester Festival Theatre.

The BBC Concert Orchestra and its Principal Conductor Keith Lockhart are joined by the folk musicians Nancy Kerr and James Fagan in a specially arranged programme featuring folk-inspired orchestral music by the likes of Holst, Moeran and Britten alongside traditional song and dance tunes.

BBC Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend
Celebrating folk music and the influence of folk on classical music

Friday 29 January 4:30pm In Tune Folk Connections Special

Suzy Klein presents a special edition of In Tune live from Cecil Sharp House in London, headquarters of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, to launch Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend celebrating folk music and exploring how folk music has inspired composers through the centuries.

With live music from special guests including folk singer Rosie Hood with her Dovetail Trio, singer-songwriter Emily Portman, pianist David Owen Norris, baritone Peter Savidge, folk duo Belshazzar's Feast and early music ensemble Florilegium, the show will be a glorious celebration of folk music from Britain and around the world.

Alongside traditional folk song there will be music influenced by folk, including the songs of George Butterworth in the year which marks the centenary of his death at the Somme.

Friday 29 January 11:00pm World on 3 Folk Connections

Lopa Kothari presents music from Calan, Bella Hardy and Afro Celt Sound System from Celtic Connections at the CCA in Glasgow - performances by leading musicians from Scotland, Wales and England as part of Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend.

Saturday 30 January 3:00pm Folk Connections

Continuing Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend, Verity Sharp chairs a discussion about the history, origins and future of folk song collecting in the UK. With live performances from Emily Portman, Fay Hield and Thomas McCarthy.

Saturday 30 January 9:45pm Between the Ears Return to Brigg Fair

Musician Jim Moray bends sound and time to recreate the circumstances surrounding a chance encounter between the composer Percy Grainger and elderly farm bailiff Joseph Taylor which marked a major turning point in the history of traditional folk music.

In 1906 the Grainger visited Brigg in Lincolnshire to record, for the very first time, the songs of traditional folk singers on a wax cylinder machine. Among his subjects was the 74 year Joseph Taylor who was later invited to attend the London premiere of Delius's An English Rhapsody which had been inspired by the old man's rendition of Brigg Fair. When he heard the familiar tune, Taylor was said to have removed his hat and sang along, encouraged by Delius and Grainger.

This programme follows Jim Moray as he experiments with technology to recreate that moment; bringing the voice of Joseph Taylor and the Delius orchestral work back together for the first time in over 100 years. Moray takes the original fragile and scratchy recording, restores the sound and then synthesises Taylor's voice in order to play it like an instrument in time with the orchestra.

Moray's technical experiment runs in parallel with his exploration of the significance of Percy Grainger's encounter with Joseph Taylor, tracing the story back to Brigg in Lincolnshire and exploring the impact of those early field recordings on the history of recorded song in general and on folk music in particular. Applying the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics, he asks if folk music is fundamentally altered by the act of recording it?

Along the way, Moray takes the synthesised rendition of Brigg Fair and brings Taylor into the 21st century by placing him in a brand new musical setting.

Sunday 31 January 6:45pm Sunday Feature Cecil Sharp's Appalachian Trail

100 years ago, in the spring of 1916, English folk song collector Cecil Sharp set out on a voyage to America, planning a give a series of lectures on English folk music. However as he was crossing the Appalachians he discovered a treasure trove of folk songs, many of them English folk songs he had never encountered before.

Andy Kershaw follows Cecil Sharp's Appalachian Trail through Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee, hearing some of the songs he collected both in their original versions and in present-day interpretations in specially-recorded sessions with contemporary singers. The 1600 songs that Cecil Sharp collected represent the bedrock of Appalachian music, songs which gave rise to the styles of old-time, country and bluegrass.

Sunday 31 January 11:50pm Folk Connections

Verity Sharp and Bruce MacGregor join the Festival after-show party, sample more highlights from Celtic Connections, and contrast the folk scenes in England and Scotland.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 04:00 PM

Lots of delights there, Henry. Thanks for this.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 05:38 PM

Thank you, Steve.

If your interests stretch across the Humber, there are several appearances of Joseph Taylor, Brigg Fair and Percy Grainger, plus Nancy Kerr's charming tribute to Joseph Taylor, Fol the Day.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 23 Jan 16 - 06:02 PM

They do indeed stretch across the Humber and my good friend, Ruairidh Greig, has done a lot of research into Grainger's singers. I too am an admirer of Joseph Taylor's singing. I sing his version of The White Hare.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 24 Jan 16 - 05:45 AM

There are Celtic Connections performances on both BBC Radio Scotland and Ulster/Foyle folk programmes at 7pm today - It's possible to record both 320kbps streams at once with get_iplayer PVR Manager!!


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 24 Jan 16 - 08:01 AM

Crikey, there is also a repeat of yesterday's "Take the Floor" broadcast on BBC Radio Scotland FM as well at 5pm, with session recordings taking up the first hour!


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,Willa
Date: 24 Jan 16 - 09:49 AM

Keith A
Just finished listening to this very enjoyable programme.

Am going to the Ballads day at Chethams on Feb 20th


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 24 Jan 16 - 02:30 PM

BBC radio stations - broadcasts categorised as folk

BBC Now and next


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 24 Jan 16 - 05:07 PM

Successfully recorded at the same time BBC Radio Scotland (Travelling Folk) and Ulster (Folk Club) 320kbps web streams this evening - some fine live performance from Celtic Connections using Web PVR Manager!


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 25 Jan 16 - 08:04 AM

BBC Radio 3 Late Junction Verity Sharp

Tuesday 26 January 23:00

With guests Nancy Kerr and James Fagan plus a varied mix of music.

In anticipation of Radio 3's Folk Connections weekend, Nancy Kerr (BBC Folk Singer of the Year 2015) and her duo partner James Fagan join Verity Sharp live in the studio to share the music that's inspired them over their twenty-year career to date.

Wednesday 27 January 23:00

Joyful spontaneity from Leveret - Rob Harbron (concertina), Sam Sweeny (fiddle) and Andy Cutting (melodeon) - as they play live in the Late Junction studio and weave their magic around traditional tunes.

Plus Hugh Tracey's recordings from Malawi, and Matthew Bourne and Franck Vigroux's reimagining of tracks from Kraftwerk's 1975 album, Radio-Activity.

Thursday 28 January 23:00

Earbending sounds from German electronic trio Saroos, panpipes from the Solomon Islands courtesy of Narasirato, tracks from Malian singer Rokia Traoré's new album Né So, and the voice of Iceland's Sóley. Plus early music from the Society of Strange and Ancient Instruments.


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 25 Jan 16 - 08:10 AM

BBC Radio 1 Tuesday 26 January 21:00 Is Protest Music Dead?
BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra's Stories

Jamie MacColl is the guitarist from Bombay Bicycle Club. He also happens to come from an amazing heritage of protest singers - his grandfather was the British activist and protest singer Ewan MacColl, his grandmother was the US feminist and folk singer Peggy Seeger and his great uncle was Pete Seeger, who helped popularise the protest song "We Shall Overcome" in the 1960s.

However Jamie admits his own band's music is far from political.

Keen to explore the current state of "protest music", Jamie goes on a journey to find out who, if anyone, still makes protest music. And, if they don't, do musicians still find ways to speak out about issues, socially, politically or culturally?

From the #blacklivesmatter movement in the US, to artists saying what they really think on twitter, to the rise and rise of grime in the UK, Jamie finds out whether protest music is dead, or has just evolved.

Not that it's an easy ride. Just how DO you get a pop star to talk to you about politics?


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Subject: RE: BBC Radio w/b 23 January 2016
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 26 Jan 16 - 07:17 AM

The Gospel Truth

BBC Radio 4 Tuesday 26 January 11.30am 1/2
BBC Radio 4 Tuesday 2 February 11.30am 2/2

Gospel's uplifting and rejoicing sound is world famous, a multi million-dollar music genre that in many ways has ended up the beating heart of American popular music. But can gospel be gospel if it entertains and makes money as well as praises the Lord? Financial educator Alvin Hall explores how this American religious music genre has been affected by commercialisation.

In the first episode, Alvin examines gospel's journey from the church to the charts through the music of Thomas Dorsey, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Mahalia Jackson and Sam Cooke. Now considered some of gospel's greatest artists, these early singers all met with strong criticism from the church as they took their songs from the sacred world into the secular. Alvin also reveals how other gospel performers in the first half of the 20th century struggled fulfilling their religious obligations whilst battling with the temptations of life on the road.

In the second part, Alvin explains how gospel became a global force in popular music. He reveals how Aretha Franklin's marriage of pop to gospel sold millions of records, introducing gospel to a world audience in the process. He looks at the rise of the gospel choir in the 1970s and 80s and discovers how it increasingly became a money-making industry. He also meets leading gospel stars Kirk Franklin and Donnie McClurkin to ask whether they think today's gospel stars have been affected by money and celebrity.


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