Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


American versus Canadian folk music

Western Trails 28 Feb 16 - 12:50 PM
Acme 28 Feb 16 - 02:18 PM
Western Trails 28 Feb 16 - 02:29 PM
GUEST,Hilary 28 Feb 16 - 05:32 PM
GUEST,HiLo 28 Feb 16 - 06:26 PM
GUEST 29 Feb 16 - 03:56 AM
Brian Peters 29 Feb 16 - 04:45 AM
GUEST,Musket 29 Feb 16 - 07:19 AM
GUEST,Hilary 29 Feb 16 - 07:45 PM
GUEST,HiLo 29 Feb 16 - 08:18 PM
GUEST,mg 01 Mar 16 - 02:47 AM
GUEST,Hilary 01 Mar 16 - 08:51 AM
GUEST,Stew 01 Mar 16 - 11:09 AM
GUEST,DrWord 01 Mar 16 - 07:20 PM
Joe Offer 02 Mar 16 - 01:34 AM
Brian Peters 02 Mar 16 - 08:34 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Western Trails
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 12:50 PM

Are the stereotypical American and Canadian styles of folk music very different? I would imagine they are similar near the borders, but it seems to me that American folk music traditions are dominated by the South.
And I do realize that I'm asking for generalizations.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Acme
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 02:18 PM

Since I grew up listening to folk music in the US near the Canadian border in the Pacific Northwest, I will observe that many of the same songs are in the North and the South US, but there are regions in the South were older versions were somewhat isolated and seem less changed at the folk process by the time people collected them. How this applies to Canada I can't say - I suspect there are islands and regions of Canada that also harbored versions of songs that were later collected. Are you going to compare those remnant versions, or are you starting another thread to argue about "what is folk music?" If not for an argument, then be prepared to try to keep people on topic.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Western Trails
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 02:29 PM

I'm not trying to start an argument, I'm just curious about whether Canada and the US have similar folk music.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,Hilary
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 05:32 PM

I'd say that yes, definitely, there is a popular perception that American folk music, and even rural music in general, is synonymous with the South, but that's not necessarily the truth of the matter. Clifford Murphy in "The Diesel Cowboy in New England," (Journal of American Folklore, 2014) wrote about growing up as a musician in New Hampshire that "it felt, to me and my peers, as though our corner of the world was one that had largely been without music for much of its long history. My studies since then have shown this to be embarrassingly false." I've personally known people who have felt that southern folk music was seen as the norm in the media as well.

Sandy Ives wrote in "Maine-Maritimes Folklore: The Lumberwoods Connection" about something he referred to as "the northern tradition," which was a pattern of broadside ballads found from Newfoundland south to Northern New Hampshire/Vermont/New York, and across the upper midwest to Minnesota and Ontario. That would argue for a similarity in folk music between the Northern US and Canada. However, Ives also mentioned a dividing line in Maine going from Mt. Washington (in New Hampshire) to Calais, which divided the Maritime from the New England song repertoire.

G Malcolm Laws writes that more British Broadside ballads were found in the Northern US and in the Canadian Maritimes than in the South (which had a lot of the Child Ballads). This has to do with immigration patterns, where Northeastern North America had more immigrants from across the pond at a later date.

Of course, I'm talking historically here. Today, I suspect many people learn songs from different regions. In general, I think probably Northern US folk songs have a similarity to the Canadian ones, but most people aren't aware of that because when they think of American folk music, they think of the south.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 28 Feb 16 - 06:26 PM

I would say that " folk", whatever that is... Is very different across Canada. east coast music is very Scottish/Acadian in its roots. North America is a huge place and the music reflects that. Nova Scotia , in particular, has a very unique tradition, as does New Brunswick in many ways. I would say that lumping together all of North America is not a good idea. there are, at least in my experience, very considerable differences. Just a
Personal observation, I am by no means an expert! But different things grow in different soils.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Feb 16 - 03:56 AM

I would say this is observable from the regionalism theory in Canadian political thought (Almost certainly American too, though I have no education on that topic) What I mean is that a Canadian from Alberta may have much more in common with someone from Montana than someone from Nova Scotia. Canadians will often break Canada up into BC, the midwest, Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes. I would imagine That the folk music from the Maritimes would resemble folk music from Maine more than it would folk music from Alberta or BC. Of course this is all speculation on my part, and I'm sure its more to do with a complex mixture of history and human mobility.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Brian Peters
Date: 29 Feb 16 - 04:45 AM

I think Hilary is bang on the mark here. You need to look at the migration patterns, both in terms of period (e.g. those old ballads in the US South) and region of origin (Nova Scotia, Quebec, etc).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,Musket
Date: 29 Feb 16 - 07:19 AM

Surely you need a cultural heritage for either to be authentic?



My work here is done 😎


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,Hilary
Date: 29 Feb 16 - 07:45 PM

HiLo, what would you say are the distinctive features of New Brunswick vs. Nova Scotia traditional music? I'm curious about what your observations have been.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 29 Feb 16 - 08:18 PM

Again, I am not a expert but I think that NS has a much greater Scottish influence, especially in Cape Breton and in Antigonish and Pictou. the Irish influence is very noticible near Halifax. the other thing is the folk tradition that derives from seafaring places, that is very evident on The south shore of Nova Scotia. There is a great diversity of folk traditions in Atlantic Canada and it all goes back Avery long way. the French shores shore of Ns has a very distinct tradition, and has   A lot in common with the French Acadian tradition of New Brunswick And Nfld is whole tradition unto itself!
In spite of the comments above byMusket, there is a vast cultural and traditional history in Eastern Canada and it is thriving and rich in diverse musical offerings. As an enthusiastic but amateur musician I have always found it a place where music is played with great joy and is always welcoming of strangers and travellers.. As they say in rural Nova Scotia ...."how late,'ll play'll ? Great culture, heritage and music !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 01 Mar 16 - 02:47 AM

i don't know but a lot of famine irish came to new brunswick. i suspect that is also more heavily french canadian than nova scotia but i don't know.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,Hilary
Date: 01 Mar 16 - 08:51 AM

Both New Brunswick and Ireland have the practice of speaking the last line of some of the broadside ballads. (That's in relation to your comment mg.) Though I can't say if Nova Scotia doesn't also have that tradition.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,Stew
Date: 01 Mar 16 - 11:09 AM

My take on the differences in root music (oldtime) is that particularly southern fiddle music differs greatly from Quebec, Maritime or even Prairie fiddle playing. Even within the Maritimes and Quebec there are different styles. As a kid the only oldtime music I could get on radio was from Wheeling or Nashville. Canada in the 50's did not have much music of that genre. Terrific musicians both sides of the border!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: GUEST,DrWord
Date: 01 Mar 16 - 07:20 PM

Off the high horse Musket. Most recent posts ~ variety across "the Maritimes" &c. ~ reference the various ethnic inputs. Likewise, the Métis of the west have a distinct style and repertoire.
Of course Canadians will change the place names in songs like "This land is your land" [from Bonavista to Vancouver Island…] and "Red River Valley" is beloved of folk from the Red in Texas another Red in Manitoba. I guess your work IS done here, Musket. My ancestors left all of their culture in the UK, and it takes a few generations to grow your own. Meanwhile,
keep on pickin'
dennis


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Mar 16 - 01:34 AM

I was born in Detroit and raised in Wisconsin. I think the traditional songs of Michigan and Wisconsin and other border states, would be completely forgotten if it weren't for the similar songs from Canadians who had similar lives and did similar work.
-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: American versus Canadian folk music
From: Brian Peters
Date: 02 Mar 16 - 08:34 AM

The other obvious factor that makes the music of the US South distinctive is the huge African-American influence, both in terms of blues and gospel music, but also in 'white' styles like string band and bluegrass (especially regarding the banjo).

As to why the music of The South has come to define 'American Folk Music', it might be due partly to the early recording industry (Bristol sessions etc), and to the work of Alan Lomax.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 20 May 5:21 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.