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A history of farting in early music

Stower 27 Jul 16 - 02:08 PM
cnd 27 Jul 16 - 05:42 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Jul 16 - 02:51 AM
BobL 28 Jul 16 - 02:57 AM
Mr Red 28 Jul 16 - 04:34 AM
Georgiansilver 28 Jul 16 - 05:19 AM
Georgiansilver 28 Jul 16 - 05:27 AM
Jack Campin 28 Jul 16 - 07:09 AM
Steve Shaw 28 Jul 16 - 09:10 AM
Vic Smith 28 Jul 16 - 10:28 AM
GUEST,Desi C 28 Jul 16 - 12:30 PM
Bat Goddess 28 Jul 16 - 02:56 PM
Helen 28 Jul 16 - 04:25 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Jul 16 - 05:42 PM
Charley Noble 28 Jul 16 - 08:40 PM
Megan L 29 Jul 16 - 06:10 AM
GUEST,Desi C 29 Jul 16 - 07:12 AM
Georgiansilver 29 Jul 16 - 03:51 PM
Seamus Kennedy 30 Jul 16 - 01:08 AM
GUEST 30 Jul 16 - 04:38 AM
Georgiansilver 30 Jul 16 - 05:03 AM
bubblyrat 30 Jul 16 - 05:23 AM
Charley Noble 30 Jul 16 - 03:43 PM
Stower 31 Jul 16 - 02:44 PM
GUEST,Ozzie Guest 31 Jul 16 - 04:19 PM
Steve Shaw 31 Jul 16 - 07:58 PM
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Subject: A history of farting in early music
From: Stower
Date: 27 Jul 16 - 02:08 PM

A brief history of farting in early music and literature.

This article started out as a bit of silliness, but soon became a serious study when I uncovered surprising historical meanings behind flatulence. Spanning the medieval, renaissance and baroque periods, with examples of iconography and a music video of William Ellis' flatulent song of 1652, 'My Lady and her Mayd'.

http://earlymusicmuse.com/a-brief-history-of-farting/


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: cnd
Date: 27 Jul 16 - 05:42 PM

Who knew?


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 02:51 AM

How on earth did you get wind of this?


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: BobL
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 02:57 AM

Wonder if it's sufficiently medicinal to qualify for an Ig Nobel prize?


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Mr Red
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 04:34 AM

I heard the reports !


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 05:19 AM

Certainly not the Nobel Peace prize surely.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 05:27 AM

Of course, somewhat later... in Victorian France.... Joseph Pujol, known as Le Ptomaine... was famous for his farting... hopefully you will get to the Youtube film via this link.
Le Petomane... Joseph Pujol... portrayed by Leonard Rossiter.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Jack Campin
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 07:09 AM

You mean Le Petomane. I found an anecdote about him which I added to my ocarina page - he could play the Marseillaise on the ocarina without breathing...


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 09:10 AM

So you wouldn't have asked to borrow his ocarina then.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Vic Smith
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 10:28 AM

Not only early music, it certainly survived until Shakespeare's time as will be remembered from the famous quote from Romeo & Juliet. -

"Farting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow."


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 12:30 PM

I think this stinks!


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 02:56 PM

Catspaw would have been the first to find this.

Linn


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Helen
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 04:25 PM

Hi Stower,

Did you include Chaucer's The Miller's Tale?

Some of the original Canterbury Tales
were filmed as modern versions of the tales for a British TV series. Brilliant! The Miller's Tale was one of them.

Helen


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 05:42 PM

Then there's Goethe's poem, beautifully set to music by Schubert, the Erl King, which mentions farting, best heard when lustily sung:

Mein farter, mein farter, und hörest du nicht,
Was Erlenkönig mir leise verspricht?


(with apologies to the poet)


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Charley Noble
Date: 28 Jul 16 - 08:40 PM

Lest we forget, there is Mark Twain's "1601" which my uncle recorded back in the early 1970s.

Charlie Ipcar


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Megan L
Date: 29 Jul 16 - 06:10 AM

Seamus Kennedy Monkey farts


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 29 Jul 16 - 07:12 AM

Gives a whole new meaning to The Wind section


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 29 Jul 16 - 03:51 PM

Jack Campin.... Le Petomane could fart the Marseillaise... but I haven't heard of him playing it on the ocarina.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 30 Jul 16 - 01:08 AM

This thread might best be left for posteriority.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jul 16 - 04:38 AM

You say you're looking for someone who'd promise never to fart...
But it ain't me babe, no no no
It ain't me you're looking for babe


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 30 Jul 16 - 05:03 AM

Nice bit of Dylan there Guest.... is there such a person~? The answer my friend is blowing in the wind. The answer is blowing in the wind.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: bubblyrat
Date: 30 Jul 16 - 05:23 AM

Would a student and / or practitioner of eructation be a fartographer ?


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Charley Noble
Date: 30 Jul 16 - 03:43 PM

Then there's the farting verse my shipmates and I composed in the 1960s to "Away Rio":

If we're becalmed that will be a great sin,
Away, Rio!
But we can fill all our sails by just breaking wind,
We're bound for the Rio Grande!

Charlie Ipcar


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Stower
Date: 31 Jul 16 - 02:44 PM

Thanks for all your good-hearted contributions. Helen, yes, I remember the 'updated' Canterbury Tales on TV a few years back with Julie Walters et al. There was also a very good animated series which is now on YouTube. Many moons ago there was a superb Radio 4 dramatisation which really brought the tales to life. Sadly, they didn't include The Summoner's Tale with the friar's gift of a fart.


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: GUEST,Ozzie Guest
Date: 31 Jul 16 - 04:19 PM

an old limerick re: Carters Little Liver Pills ....
there was a man named Carter
my God he was a farter
when the wind wouldn't blow
and the ship wouldn't go
ol' Carter's farts would start her


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Subject: RE: A history of farting in early music
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 31 Jul 16 - 07:58 PM

Don't you just love that old folk song "Point Your Arse to the Equator"? Unfortunately, political correctness dictated that its name be changed to the rather euphemistic "Blow the Wind Southerly..."


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