Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'

GUEST,Luke Bretscher 11 Aug 16 - 07:20 PM
Joe Offer 11 Aug 16 - 08:36 PM
Joe Offer 11 Aug 16 - 09:17 PM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 02:23 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 02:53 AM
GUEST,Reionhard 12 Aug 16 - 02:56 AM
GUEST,Reinhard 12 Aug 16 - 02:57 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 03:18 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 03:27 AM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 03:47 AM
Mo the caller 12 Aug 16 - 05:04 AM
Jack Campin 12 Aug 16 - 07:28 AM
GUEST,Luke Bretscher 12 Aug 16 - 10:22 AM
keberoxu 12 Aug 16 - 12:14 PM
Mysha 12 Aug 16 - 02:14 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 12 Aug 16 - 03:05 PM
Mysha 12 Aug 16 - 03:21 PM
Joe Offer 12 Aug 16 - 06:59 PM
Mysha 12 Aug 16 - 07:53 PM
GUEST,Grishka 15 Aug 16 - 06:06 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,Luke Bretscher
Date: 11 Aug 16 - 07:20 PM

I recently read something about a classic ballad (probably in the Child index). Unfortunately, all I remember is that it had the same story as the German ballad "Der wilde Wassermann" http://ingeb.org/Lieder/EsFreitE.html. That is, a river-monster forcibly weds a maiden; she wishes to leave, but cannot desert her children (especially as there's an odd number of them).

Also, I notice that Faun performs "Der wilde Wassermann" to the tune of the Staines Morris Dance. Is that their own idea or does it have more history?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Der wilde Wassermann
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Aug 16 - 08:36 PM

Well, let's start with the text we know about, since it's easier to discuss something if we don't have to refer to another source.
Source: http://ingeb.org/Lieder/EsFreitE.html

Der wilde Wassermann
Die schöne Lilofee


1. Es freit ein wilder Wassermann
Auf der Burg wohl über dem See.
Des Königs Tochter wollt er han,
|: Die schöne junge Lilofee. :|

2. Sie hörte drunten Glocken gehn
Im tiefen, tiefen See,
Wollt' Vater und Mutter wiedersehn,
|: Die schöne, junge Lilofee. :|

3. Und als sie vor dem Tore stand
Auf der Burg wohl über dem See,
Da neigt sich Laub und grünes Gras
|: Vor der schönen, jungen Lilofee. :|

4. Und als sie aus der Kirche kam
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See,
Da stand der wilde Wassermann
|: Vor der schönen, jungen Lilofee. :|

5. "Sprich, willst du hinuntergehn mit mir
Von der Burg wohl über dem See?
Deine Kindlein unten weinen nach dir,
|: Du schöne, junge Lilofee. :|

6. "Und eh ich die Kindlein weinen laß
Im tiefen, tiefen See,
Scheid ich von Laub und grünem Gras,
|: Ich arme, junge Lilofee." :|

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVQf0LPdfN4

Interesting song.
-Joe-



There's another interesting version here:
Here's the text:

Es freit ein wilder Wassermann

 
  • Melodie: seit dem frühen 19. Jahrhundert aus Nordböhmen (St. Joachimsthal, heute: Jáchymov) überliefert
    Text: in verschiedenen Fassungen seit dem frühen 19. Jahrhundert überliefert. Hier nach Max Pohl (1869-1928), in Selle/Pohl, "Hundert deutsche Volkslieder aus älterer Zeit", Hannover 1911


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Aug 16 - 09:17 PM

I should be ashamed of myself for posting a Google translation, but I'm late for choir practice and gotta go. I'll fix it later.

DER WILDE WASSERMANN SONGTEXT

Es freit ein wilder Wassermann
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Er freit nach königlichem Stamm,
Der schönen, jungen Lilofee.

Er ließ eine Brücke bau'n
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Darauf sollt' sie spazieren geht,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Als sie auf die Brücke kam
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Der Wassermann zog sie hinab,
Die schöne junge Lilofee.

Drunten war sie sieben Jahr,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Und sieben Kinder sie ihm gebar,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Sie hörte drob' die Glocken geh'n,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Wollt' Vater und Mutter wiederseh'n,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Als sie aus der Kirche kam,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Da stand der wilde Wassermann,
Vor der schönen, jungen Lilofee.

"Willst du hinunter geh'n mit mir?
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Deine Kinder drunten weinen nach dir,
Du schöne, junge Lilofee."

"Die Kinder lass uns teilen,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Nehm' ich mir drei, nimmst Du dir drei,
Ich arme, junge Lilofee."

"Das siebte lass uns teilen,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Nehm ich mir ein Bein, nimmst du dir ein Bein,
Du schöne, junge Lilofee."

"Eh dass ich die Kinder teilen lass,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Scheid ich von Laub und grünem Gras,
Ich arme, junge Lilofee."
THE WILD AQUARIUS Lyrics

It marries a wild Aquarius
Before the castle well above the lake
He freed by royal master,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

He let bau'n a bridge
Before the castle well above the lake
Then shall 'she walks,
The beautiful young Lilofee.

When she came to the bridge
Before the castle well above the lake
The Aquarius pulled them down,
The beautiful young Lilofee.

Down there it was seven year
Before the castle well above the lake
And seven children she bore him,
The beautiful young Lilofee.

She heard drob 'the bells geh'n,
Before the castle well above the lake
Will's father and mother wiederseh'n,
The beautiful young Lilofee.

When she came out of the church,
Before the castle well above the lake
There stood the wild Aquarius,
Before the beautiful, young Lilofee.

"Will you come with me down?
Before the castle well above the lake
Your children down there crying for you,
You beautiful young Lilofee. "

"The children let us share,
Before the castle well above the lake
Participating I me three, you take you three,
I poor young Lilofee. "

"The seventh let tell us,
Before the castle well above the lake
I Nehm my leg, you take one leg,
You beautiful young Lilofee. "

"Eh I let divide the children,
Before the castle well above the lake
Scheid I of leaves and green grass,
I poor young Lilofee. "


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 02:23 AM

OK, let's see if I can do my own translation and come up with something better. By the way, I found references to this song as early as 1813, and it seems to come from the area around Joachimsthal (in Brandenburg, not far from Berlin).
To start off with, "Aquarius" does not seem to be a good translation of Wasserman which refers to any male water spirit.
If you look up the term "es freit," most likely you'll end up with this song - the term doesn't seem common elsewhere. Down below, Reinhard says "freien" means to court, so I'll edit that in. I'm still not satisfied with the second-last line, "I will deprive myself of leaves and green grass."

DER WILDE WASSERMANN SONGTEXT

Es freit ein wilder Wassermann
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Er freit nach königlichem Stamm,
Der schönen, jungen Lilofee.

Er ließ eine Brücke bau'n
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Darauf sollt' sie spazieren geht,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Als sie auf die Brücke kam
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Der Wassermann zog sie hinab,
Die schöne junge Lilofee.

Drunten war sie sieben Jahr,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Und sieben Kinder sie ihm gebar,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Sie hörte drob' die Glocken geh'n,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Wollt' Vater und Mutter wiederseh'n,
Die schöne, junge Lilofee.

Als sie aus der Kirche kam,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Da stand der wilde Wassermann,
Vor der schönen, jungen Lilofee.

"Willst du hinunter geh'n mit mir?
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Deine Kinder drunten weinen nach dir,
Du schöne, junge Lilofee."

"Die Kinder lass uns teilen,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Nehm' ich mir drei, nimmst Du dir drei,
Ich arme, junge Lilofee."

"Das siebte lass uns teilen,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Nehm ich mir ein Bein, nimmst du dir ein Bein,
Du schöne, junge Lilofee."

"Eh dass ich die Kinder teilen lass,
Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
Scheid ich von Laub und grünem Gras,
Ich arme, junge Lilofee."
THE WILD WATER SPIRIT

A wild water spirit
Before the castle well above the lake (over the sea?)
Courted one from royal stock,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

He had a bridge built
Before the castle well above the lake
There she was to go walking,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

When she came onto the bridge
Before the castle well above the lake;
The water spirit pulled her down,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

She was there below for seven years,
Before the castle well above the lake,
And seven children she bore him,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

She heard the bells ringing above,
Before the castle well above the lake,
And she wanted to see her father and mother again,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

When she came out of the church,
Before the castle well above the lake,
There stood the wild water spirit,
Before the beautiful, young Lilofee.

"Do you want you go down below with me?
Before the castle well above the lake
Your children are crying down below for you,
You beautiful, young Lilofee. "

[she said] "The children let us share,
Before the castle well above the lake
I will take three, and you take three,
I, the poor, young Lilofee."

[he said] "The seventh let us divide,
Before the castle well above the lake
I will take one leg, and you take one leg,
You beautiful, young Lilofee."

[she said] "Before I would allow the children to be divided,
Before the castle well above the lake
I would deprive myself (divorce myself from) of leaves and green grass,
I, the poor, young Lilofee. "


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 02:53 AM

My first attempt at translation, before help from Reinhard, was this:

THE WILD WATER SPIRIT

There lived a wild water spirit
Before the castle well above the lake
He came from royal stock,
The beautiful, young Lilofee.

That didn't satisfy me, so my second attempt was this:
    OK, so "freit" may come from the word "free," and the word "befreien" means "to set free"; but let's translate "freit" that way.


    DER WILDE WASSERMANN SONGTEXT

    Es freit ein wilder Wassermann
    Vor der Burg wohl über dem See
    Er freit nach königlichem Stamm,
    Der schönen, jungen Lilofee.
    THE WILD WATER SPIRIT

    A wild water spirit,
    Before the castle well above the lake
    Set free one from royal stock,
    The beautiful, young Lilofee.

I'll edit in my final translation above.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,Reionhard
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 02:56 AM

The Wild Waterman (English translation)

Ko e Tangatavai Lolotu (Tongan translation)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,Reinhard
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 02:57 AM

German "freien" is English "to court".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 03:18 AM

There's another version at http://www.lieder-archiv.de/es_freit_ein_wilder_wassermann-notenblatt_300444.html:

Es freit ein wilder Wassermann

Volkslied (1813)

    Es freit ein wilder Wassermann
    in der Burg wohl über dem See.
    Des Königs Tochter mußt er han,
    die schöne junge Lilofee.

    Sie hörte drunten Glocken gehn
    im tiefen, tiefen See.
    Wollt Vater und Mutter wiedersehn,
    die schöne junge Lilofee.

    Und als sie vor dem Tore stand,
    vor der Burg wohl über dem See,
    da neigt sich Laub und grünes Gras
    vor der schönen jungen Lilofee.

    Und als sie aus der Kirche kam
    von der Burg wohl über dem See,
    da stand der wilde Wassermann
    vor der schönen jungen Lilofee.

    Sprich, willst du hinunter gehn mit mir
    von der Burg wohl über dem See.
    Deine Kindlein weinen nach dir,
    du junge schöne Lilofee.

    Und eh ich die Kindlein weinen lass
    im tiefen, tiefen See,
    scheid ich von Laub und grünem Gras,
    ich arme junge Lilofee.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD Version: Die Schoene Lilofee
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 03:27 AM

Now, here's another version, one that centers more on Lilofee. And the bad guy here is a "Nickelmann." What's that? Google says, "a merman." Here's the song:


Volksdichtung

Die schöne Lilofee

Es hat ein König ein Töchterlein.
Wie hieß es denn mit Namen sein?
Die schöne Lilofee.

Ein Nickelmann freite so lang um sie
und hätte so gerne, er wußte nicht wie,
die schöne Lilofee.

Da ließ er von Gold eine Brücke aufstehn,
darauf sollte sie spazierengehn,
die schöne Lilofee.

Und als sie auf die Brücke sprang,
die Brücke ins tiefe Wasser sank
mit der schönen Lilofee.

Sie war dadrunten sieben Jahr,
sieben junge Söhne sie gebar,
die schöne Lilofee.

Und da sie bei der Wiege stand,
da hörte sie einen Glockenklang,
die schöne Lilofee.

»Ach Nickelmann, lieber Nickelmann,
laß mich noch einmal zur Kirche gahn,
mich arme Lilofee.«

Und als sie auf den Kirchhof kam,
da neigte sich Laub und grünes Gras
vor der schönen Lilofee.

Und als sie in die Kirche kam,
da neigte sich Graf und Edelmann
vor der schönen Lilofee.

Der Vater machte die Bank ihr auf,
die Mutter legte das Kissen drauf
der schönen Lilofee.

Als sie sich wieder nach Hause gewandt,
ihr Vater, ihre Mutter nahmen sie bei der Hand,
die schöne Lilofee.

Sie führten sie oben an ihren Tisch
und setzten ihr auf gebackenen Fisch,
der schönen Lilofee.

Und als sie den ersten Bissen aß,
sprang ihr ein Apfel auf den Schoß,
der schönen Lilofee.

»Ach liebe Mutter, seid so gut,
werft mir den Apfel in Feuersglut,
mir armen Lilofee.«

Da löschte ein Wasser das Feuer aus,
der wilde Nickelmann sprang heraus,
vor die schöne Lilofee.

»Ei willst du mich hier verbrennen sehn,
wer wird denn unseren Kindern beistehn,
du böse Lilofee?«

»Die sieben Kinder, die teilen wir,
nimmst du ihrer drei, nehm ich ihrer vier,
ich arme Lilofee.«

»Nehm ich ihrer drei, nimmst du ihrer drei.
Das siebente wollen wir teilen gleich,
du schöne Lilofee.

Nehm ich ein Bein, nimmst du ein Bein,
daß wir einander gleiche sein,
du schöne Lilofee.«

»Und eh ich mir laß mein Kind zerteilen,
viel lieber will ich im Wasser bleiben,
ich arme Lilofee.«


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 03:47 AM

More versions to explore here:This was fun, but I gotta go to bed...

And to answer Luke's primary question, I don't know of any comparable ballad in the English language.
G'nite.
-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Mo the caller
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 05:04 AM

Isn't there a story - but the other way round. A mermaid who comes ashore to marry a fisherman.

Perennial story of mixed marriage. It wouldn't make such a good song if it was about an Evangelical and an Atheist, even if there are the same tensions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Jack Campin
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 07:28 AM

The ballad seems to ba part of a corpus of stories/songs about relationships between humans and water spirits. The Outlandish Knight may be part of the same group - it ends by providing an alternate ending where the German ballad starts, with the woman throwing the alien being into the river and making her escape.

At the other end of the story, The Wife of Usher's Well has three children coming back from the water to revisit their mother. It's been refashioned into a conventional ghost story, but you can see how a different spin on the events could have made it a sequel to Lilofee's story.

And as Mo says, the Irish/Orkney version reverses roles.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,Luke Bretscher
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 10:22 AM

Ha, I think I've found it!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hind_Etin

The guy isn't a water-spirit, but he does take the unfortunate maiden into the wilderness and get seven children on her.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: keberoxu
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 12:14 PM

Ach, Joe, you don't know your Wagner!! If you knew The Flying Dutchman, and the [imitation] traditional Ballade sung by heroine Senta, then, you would have seen, in the German lyric describing the curse on the Dutchman, the third verse:

Vor Anker alle sieben Jahr,
ein Weib zu freien, geht er ans Land;
Er freite alle sieben Jahr,
noch nie ein treues Weib er fand.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Mysha
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 02:14 PM

Hi,

I don't know Wagner that well either. But what's the relation to the song about the nix?

Bye,
                                                                  Mysha


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 03:05 PM

Mysha et al., Senta's Ballade in verse 3 contains the verb "freien" which puzzled Joe Offer in the initial posts.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Mysha
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 03:21 PM

Hi,

Oh, I see. By the time I got here, he had already edited that in.

Joe:
Would something like "I'll part myself from leaves and green grass." work?

Bye,
                                                                  Mysha


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 06:59 PM

Hi, Mysha -
I think I'm missing something of the meaning of the leaves and green grass. Either that, or the ending of the song is a big letdown. If she deprives herself of leaves and green grass (or gets divorced from them), what's the big deal? Where's the drama?

-Joe-

P.S. I came across an actual German dictionary in a bookstore today, and it said "freien" meant "to woo." I had actual dictionaries in the house last night, but I decided to Google instead of climbing the stairs. Google failed me...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: Mysha
Date: 12 Aug 16 - 07:53 PM

Hi Joe,

Well, to woo and to court can be used as synonyms, I guess, but yes, to woo would be slightly more explicit.

The leaves and the green grass are nature; in that time they are (expected to be) present in any location on solid land. On the other hand, life with a nix, a neck(?) was not natural. It also wasn't like being tempted to enter the splendid hills/halls of the fay folk: The home of a nix was usually supposed to be a miserable place to live for a human, and a nix is an ugly, mean creature that will cause ships to sink and vanish. Thus, by parting from the grass and the leaves, she gives up normal life for the sake of her children. For seven years she has held hope to escape her watery prison and return to her own world on land, but now she gives in to the nix' machinations and willingly goes back to him, giving up her hope so her children may not come to harm.

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Engl. version of 'Der wilde Wassermann'
From: GUEST,Grishka
Date: 15 Aug 16 - 06:06 PM

My understanding of the short ingeb version is that the woman, although originally abducted against her will and now escaped to her parents' castle, decides to rejoin her family down in the lake, thus departing from the land with its greenery. A simple story that does not essentially rely on supernatural effects; similar stories can be read in today's newspapers.

The variant with the failed divorce agreement seems to be inspired by good old Solomon. In the end, the lady caves in, although she may have contented herself with taking three kids, or sharing the fourth one on a monthly basis (difficult with the school, though).

I suspect the author was a man, whose message is that women will prefer to stay with their husbands and children even if abducted and deprived of air to breathe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 15 July 6:22 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.