Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Next to last line in Gallant Murray

Related threads:
Lyr/Chords Req: Gallant Murray (14)
Lyr Req: Gallant Murray (4)
Lyr Req: Gallant Murray (answered)^^^ (5)


JenBurdoo 27 Sep 16 - 10:33 PM
BobKnight 28 Sep 16 - 12:22 AM
GUEST,kenny 29 Sep 16 - 05:26 AM
GUEST,kenny 29 Sep 16 - 05:53 AM
GUEST,kenny 29 Sep 16 - 05:54 AM
BobKnight 29 Sep 16 - 06:48 AM
GUEST,Guest TF 29 Sep 16 - 03:17 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: JenBurdoo
Date: 27 Sep 16 - 10:33 PM

Hi,

Looking at recording the traditional song Gallant Murray, AKA Atholl Highlanders. I don't technically need to know because it's pronounced the same in every rendition I've heard, but is the line supposed to be:

"Scour the DARK and face the danger"

OR

"Scour the DIRK and face the danger"?

Either would work - one is to search the night for signs of the enemy, the other is to clean your skean dhu before battle. Whenever I find lyrics, it is spelled "DURK."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: BobKnight
Date: 28 Sep 16 - 12:22 AM

Having listened to Andy M. Stewart sing it, the verse gives a list of weapons, musket, rapier, etc. In that context I would think the word is DIRK. No Scot would ever pronounce DARK, as DURK. One of the hazards of taking words from the internet - they are invariably wrong, especially where the lyrics are in Scots.

Internet lyrics are a great thing, but I always refer back to the original singer, and edit them as the mistakes show themselves.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 29 Sep 16 - 05:26 AM

The alternative title for the song is "The Atholl Gathering", not the "Atholl Highlanders".
It's certainly been recorded by the "Battlefield Band" and I think Davey Steele when he was a member of "Ceolbeg". I'll hunt down the recordings and have a listen.
According to "Battlefield Band" sleeve notes, the song comes from James Hogg's "Jacobite Relics", so that would be a more reliable source than anything on the internet. The notes also say that "Hogg suggests that it was taken from an anonymous Jacobite poem written in 1745".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 29 Sep 16 - 05:53 AM

This is mildly embarrassing. I actually have a copy of "Hogg's Jacobite Relics", which I'd nearly forgotten about. Hogg does indeed have "scour the DURK" as the lyric. [ Page 97, Second edition ]
Alan Reid sings "durk" on the "Battlefield Band" recording.
I agree with Bob Knight's theory above, but although "dirk" is almost certainly meant, and is perfectly logical, the word as printed in "Hogg's" is spelt "durk"and the singers I've heard sing the song seem to have kept to that pronunciation.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 29 Sep 16 - 05:54 AM

"Youtube" :

https://youtu.be/DsyiKF_XkHc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: BobKnight
Date: 29 Sep 16 - 06:48 AM

It could be an obsolete word, no longer in use of course. I remember doing an essay on "Felix Randall The Farrier," by Gerard Manley Hopkins, where Felix Randall is described as "hardy handsome." After much struggling with the text, I discovered that "hardy" referred to a tool used by farriers in bygone days. However, I prefer to think that Hogg, was giving a clue to pronunciation in Scots. The vowel sounds in Scots are different from English.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Next to last line in Gallant Murray
From: GUEST,Guest TF
Date: 29 Sep 16 - 03:17 PM

Aye Bob, Chambers Scots Dictionary has it as Durk: a short dagger (or even a short, thickset person).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 April 1:19 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.