Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed

DigiTrad:
BACHELOR'S HALL


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Bachelor's Hall


jb3 15 Jun 98 - 02:04 AM
JB3 15 Jun 98 - 02:07 AM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 16 Jun 98 - 05:25 PM
Lesley N. 11 Dec 99 - 10:10 PM
Bruce O. 12 Dec 99 - 12:29 AM
Willie-O 12 Dec 99 - 12:58 AM
Lesley N. 12 Dec 99 - 01:19 AM
Lesley N. 12 Dec 99 - 01:34 AM
Bruce O. 12 Dec 99 - 02:00 AM
bunkerhill 12 Dec 99 - 09:22 AM
Jeri 12 Dec 99 - 09:38 AM
Willie-O 12 Dec 99 - 11:05 AM
Lesley N. 12 Dec 99 - 11:12 AM
harpgirl 12 Dec 99 - 11:38 AM
Rick Fielding 12 Dec 99 - 12:30 PM
Jeri 12 Dec 99 - 01:03 PM
kendall 12 Dec 99 - 09:49 PM
Stewie 13 Dec 99 - 02:15 AM
Bruce O. 13 Dec 99 - 02:21 PM
Willie-O 13 Dec 99 - 11:43 PM
Mary in Kentucky 10 Aug 00 - 08:59 PM
Joe Offer 20 Feb 03 - 04:42 AM
Jim Dixon 07 Mar 04 - 11:21 PM
Billy Weeks 08 Mar 04 - 12:28 PM
davidmeredith 21 Nov 04 - 09:53 AM
GUEST 24 Nov 04 - 08:53 AM
GUEST,ebrookejenkins@yahoo.com 06 Dec 04 - 08:54 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Mar 07 - 10:38 PM
12-stringer 03 May 08 - 03:35 AM
GUEST,Shimrod 03 May 08 - 12:09 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum Child
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: LYR ADD: Bachelor's Hall
From: jb3
Date: 15 Jun 98 - 02:04 AM

This version is fairly different from the one in the data-base. I learned this song from my grandfather, Boone Burton, who learned it from the singing of his mother, Sally McQueary. They said of my great-grandmother that "she could sing all night and all day and never sing the same song twice." Unfortunately, the family now knows only a handful of her songs. ^^

Bachelor's Hall

The boys they all dress as fine as they can
To cheat the girls is all their desire
They'll rattle and tattle and tattle and lie
And keep the girls up 'til they're ready to die

And they will arise and to them say
Oh boys I feel sleepy, I wish you'd go 'way
You're nothing but false, without a discorn (sic)
Before you get home, you'll sleep in some barn

And early next morning you will rise
Brush off the hay, wipe out your eyes
You'll mount a fine horse and home you will ride
You're nothing but false, propped up upon pride

And when you get home, you'll stagger and reel
And it's, "Curse those girls, how sleepy I feel"
If I was a man, I'd court not at all
I'd just live to myself and keep bachelor's hall

A bachelor's life, I think it the best
Lie down at night and take your own rest
No wife to scold, no children to bawl
I'd just live to myself and keep bachelor's hall

And when a girl marries, her pleasures are done
Her trials are started and her troubles come on
For the husband will quarrel and the children will cry
And it makes her red cheeks look withered and dry

If I was a man, I'd court not at all
I'd just live to myself and keep bachelor's hall


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: LYR ADD: Bachelor's Hall
From: JB3
Date: 15 Jun 98 - 02:07 AM

I should have mentioned that our family is from south central Kentucky. Plato, Ky. to be exact.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: LYR ADD: Bachelor's Hall
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 16 Jun 98 - 05:25 PM

A version of this is sung in eastern Canada.

I know an alternative version of one of the verses above:

Batchelor's Hall is always the best
Be ye sick, drunk, or sober, you're always at rest
No wife for to scold you, no children to bawl
Oh happy's the man who keeps Batchelor's Hall
And it's O, O, laddie-o.

Always liked it, since I keep Batchelor's Hall myself.


Messages from multiple threads combined. Messages below are from a new thread.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: BACHELOR'S HALL
From: Lesley N.
Date: 11 Dec 99 - 10:10 PM

I have now run across at least three versions for BACHELOR'S HALL. There is a version in Digital Bachelor's Hall (though I am confused by the lines between the third and fourth verses - is it supposed to be a chorus, or is it a fragment?)

I also have a version by Jean Ritchie

Oh hard is my fortune and hard is my fate,
Controlled by my mother so early and late,
And when I get married just to end all the strife,
Controlled by a man for the rest of my life.

O, young men go a-courtin' they dress up so fine,
They cheat the girls up, that is all their design;
They'll titter, they'll tatter,
They'll laugh and they'll lie,
They'll cheat the girls up till they're ready to die.

When young men go a-courtin' they stay up all night,
Get out in the mornin' and look like a fright;
They saddle their horses, they rock and they reel,
Dag-gone them old girls, how sleepy I do feel!

O, bachelor's hall it is bound to be best,
Get drunk or stay sober, lay down take your rest,
No woman to scold you, no children to bawl,
So happy is the man that keeps bachelor's hall.


I only have one tune - that by Jean Ritchie in her Folk Songs of the Southern Appalachians. Here it is - I hope


Click to play


ABC format:

X:1
T:The Bachelor's Hall
M:6/8
Q:1/4=116
K:C
A301/60G14/15F/20|-FD21/20D14/15D21/20C14/15D31/30|
-D/60F14/15D21/20C21/20D119/60D14/15F/30|
-F89/60F7/15F21/20F21/20G14/15A61/60|-A/30c14/15A21/20G14/15A91/30A/60|
-A181/60d119/60c|-c/20A14/15^A21/20c14/15F21/20D14/15D7/12D7/15|
F21/20D14/15D21/20F119/60G14/15A/20|-AA21/20A14/15c21/20A14/15G31/30|
-G/60F14/15D21/20C21/20D59/20|-D3A119/60G61/60|
-G/30F14/15D21/20D14/15D21/20C21/20D14/15F/60|
-F31/30D14/15C21/20D119/60D|-D/20F7/5F7/12F14/15F21/20G14/15A21/20|
c21/20A14/15G21/20A35/12A/20|-A179/60d119/60c31/30|
-c/60A14/15^A21/20c21/20F14/15D21/20D7/15D7/15F/30|
-F61/60D14/15D21/20F119/60G61/60|-G/30A14/15A21/20A14/15c21/20A21/20G14/15F/60|
-F31/30D14/15C21/20D179/60|-D89/30A119/60G21/20|
F21/20D14/15D21/20D14/15C21/20D59/60|-D/15F14/15D21/20C14/15D119/60D31/30|
-D/60F91/60F7/15F21/20F14/15G21/20A14/15c/30|
-c61/60A21/20G14/15A3|-A/30A91/30d119/60c14/15A/60|
-A31/30^A14/15c21/20F21/20D14/15D7/15D8/15|
-D/20F14/15D21/20D14/15F21/10G14/15|A21/20A14/15A21/20c14/15A21/20G59/60|
-G/15F14/15D21/20C14/15D181/60|-D61/20A119/60G29/30|
-G/12F14/15D21/20D14/15D21/20C14/15D61/60|
-D/30F21/20D14/15C21/20D119/60D14/15F/60|
-F3/2F7/12F14/15F21/20G14/15A|-A/20c14/15A21/20G21/20A35/12|
A91/30d119/60c59/60|-c/15A14/15^A21/20c14/15F21/20D21/20D7/15D9/20|
-D/60F21/20D14/15D21/20F119/60G29/30|-G/12A14/15A21/20A14/15c21/20A14/15G61/60|
-G/30F21/20D14/15C21/20D44/15|-D181/60A119/60G|
-G/20F21/20D14/15C14/15D91/30|-D91/30||

Steve Round's broadside index indicates Rev. Baring-Gould collected a version which began "To Bachelor's Hall we brave sportsmen invite.." Does anyone have additional words to BG's - is the Appalachian version related to it or is this just a popular theme??? (Charles Dibdin wrote a song called Bachelor's Hall as well - which wouldn't have any relation.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 12:29 AM

I don't have Baring-Gould's version, and hadn't looke for it in Steve Roud's broadside or folksong indexes. I hadn't seen Jean Ritchie's before. I have the one by Steeleye Span. I had thought the latter was an English song, but I haven't run across it in any English collection. I was stunned about 3 weeks ago when Dick Spottswood on WAMU played an American recording of it of c 1924.

Note the first verse of Ritchie's is an imitation of the 1st verse of Henry Carey's "The Ladies Case", c 1730-32

How hard is the fortune of all womenkind,
They're alway contolled, they're always confined,
Controlled by their parents until they're made wives,
Then slaves to their husbands for the rest of their lives.
There's another verse by Carey, and two more were added later. I've seen a copy on a single sheet song with music where the tune (by Mr. Gough) was completely screwed up by the engraver. There's a copy with good music in 'The Muses Delight', 1754.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Willie-O
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 12:58 AM

I learned it many years ago--I'm pretty sure from an Ed McCurdy record.

very different version--only one verse similar, which goes:

For Bachelor's Hall it is always the best.
Be you sick drunk or sober, you're always at rest
Come in when you like and lie down on the straw
You can eat the whole cake, be it done, be it raw
And its oh, oh-oh-oh laddie-oh.

Thanks for the memory. I'll have to look up the rest. I took it as a Newfoundland song at the time. It didn't have the "hard is the fortune of all womankind" part which really doesn't seem to belong in this song, thematically.

Bill C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Lesley N.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 01:19 AM

Thanks Bruce! I'm glad it's nearly Christmas - I have a huge list of books..

I've always assumed BH was English, and have been surprised by the lack of information I've found. So I finally find some information - and it just confuses me!

In addition to Baring-Gould, it is in Edith Fowke's Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs, and Fuson's Ballads of the Kentucky Highlands. Those lyrics correlate closely with the Ritchie song.

I've done a bit more research. The other source in the broadside index was Garland of New Songs printed by Angus of Newcastle. It was a dead end until it finally occured to me the Bodleian might have something. According to the Bodly they printed 1774-1825 - and they have a ton of their broadsides. The first line is "To bachelor's hall we good fellows invite..." I'm not very good at the Bodley search yet - I went through the first thirty of Angus and hadn't run across it. My eyes are crossing so I will start looking again tomorrow AM!

I see that Rick Fielding recorded it. Wonder which version he recorded?

Thanks again Bruce.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Lesley N.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 01:34 AM

And thanks Bill too - our messages cross in cyberspace! You're right about there being a Canadian version. Wish I had Fowke to look it up!

I agree the women don't seem to fit in with the general theme. To summarize Ritchie, she says it's as though the women are complaining and men get in the last word. Maybe it was like the Laird of Cockpen and someone put in a last verse... (People didn't like the ending in Laird where she rejected him so they added verses where she changes her mind and marries the idiot!) Though with a name like Bachelor's Hall maybe the first verses came later!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 02:00 AM

The chapbook title used by the Angus (and sucessor Anguses, Newcastle or Gateside) 'A Garland of New Songs', won't get you very far, as there are around 40 that I know of with that title.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: bunkerhill
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 09:22 AM

Ritchie also notes somewhere that "Bachelor's Hall" was popular at Pine Mountain Settlement School while one of her sisters was attending. There was a close association between settlement schools and the suffrage movement. Many of the settlement workers had an interest in collecting songs. The climate around 1920, when the vote was finally won, or the years leading up to it, would have been ripe for crossover of women's lament lyrics into a song originally celebrating joys of bachelorhood.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Jeri
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 09:38 AM

Lesley, it sounds like Rick recorded the version Bill C posted the verse for. The notes to the CD say it was collected by Ken Peacock from the singing of Mr. Howard Morry of Newfoundland.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Willie-O
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 11:05 AM

That figures. I think my parents still have the album so I'll check next time I visit.

There were a lot of recordings of Maritime and particularly Newfoundland songs from the fifties--by Ed McCurdy, Alan Mills, Omar Blondahl, Tom Kines and so on. Looking back in them now, there are a lot of songs currently being sung by us now middle-aged folkies in pretty much the same versions as on these records--but also some great songs such as Bachelor's Hall that have fallen out of currency. (Every time I think I find a forgotten gem though, Ian Robb puts it on his next recording..)

Bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Lesley N.
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 11:12 AM

Turns out the Bachelor's Hall version that is on the broadsides at the Bodly (and BG) is the Dibdin version. I can't find one that correlates to the hard fortune lyrics - which doesn't mean it's not there, just that I can't find it if it is!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: harpgirl
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 11:38 AM

Lesley and Bruce...I know and sing this song as "The Wagonner's Lad"...The Bachelor's Hall I am familiar with was sung by Jim Ringer...harpgirl


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 12:30 PM

Leslie, the version of "Bachelor's Hall" that I recorded on "Lifeline" was sung for a number of years by a wonderful balladeer named Tom Kines. Jeri's info is correct about it's origin. Tom was very theatrical, and because he had a trained voice, came close at times to being one of those "grand piano folkies". I only got to know him about a year before he died and he appeared a trifle bitter that he never got invited to folk festivals. He couldn't for the life of him understand why a twenty year old singing about a recent love affair, warranted inclusion at a gathering of folkies, and he, who had spent a lifetime carrying on Canadian ballad tradition was so rejected. I believe he was close to Richard Dyer Bennett, and Ed McCurdy. For a time he had a CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) radio show called "the song peddlar". I sing about 10 of his versions of Canadian folk songs.
Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Jeri
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 01:03 PM

Rick, sorry if I "stole your fire" - I didn't know if you would have time to post. Shame about Tom Kines. I think, as with a lot of things in life, we have to mix "what the people want" with "what we think they need to know." People only want what they know about already. I'm curious what other songs you have from him.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: kendall
Date: 12 Dec 99 - 09:49 PM

How about an unbiased opinion? Ricks version is the one I like, and his rendition is top quality. If you dont have his recording, Lifeline, you are missing some of the best there is.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: BACHELOR'S HALL
From: Stewie
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 02:15 AM

The version that Dave Burland sings is as follows and, like everything Burland does, it's great. It differs from that given above and the one in DT. He had it from Mike Seeger. There is no lyric sheet in his CD; this is my transcription: ^^ BACHELOR'S HALL

Oh I rode seven horses clean to death
I rode them till they had no breath
And I wore five saddles down to the tree
And none of them girls won't marry me
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

Oh the wind it will howl and the children will bawl
The greatest of pleasures keep Bachelor's Hall
The devil for one and he may have all
Sooner stay single, keep Bachelor's Hall
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

For I wake up in the morning how I stumble and reel
For all of them girls how sweetly I feel
On this here courtin', I court none at all
Sooner stay single, keep Bachelor's Hall
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

Then saddle up my horse and I'll ride him away
I keep up them girls till it's almost day
I'll ride home and I'm meaning no harm
Before I get home I'll sleep in some barn
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

For it takes three hours for the women to dress
Then two hours before the glass
They'll primp up and they'll go away
The devil himself wouldn't look so gay
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

So saddle up my horse and I'll ride him away
Keep up them girls till it's almost day
I'll ride home and I'll stir up my store
I'll eat my own hoecakes be done or be raw
Sing fol ay riddle ay day

Source: Dave Burland 'Benchmark' Fat Cat Records FATCD004.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Bruce O.
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 02:21 PM

Dibdin's "Bachelor's Hall" is from his 'The Oddites', 1790 (as is "Every Inch a Sailor") and is reprinted in 'The Universal Songster', II, p. 355, 1826. "Bachelor's Hall" is the subtitle of one of Thomas Moore's songs in the Levy sheet music collection. Where the American one came from I don't know.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarificaiton needed
From: Willie-O
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 11:43 PM

Right Rick, must have been Tom Kines I heard sing it. The album we had had Tom on vocals and guitar, accompanied by a very good clarinet player--quite a creative sound for the period. (early 60's I think).

The song I learned off that album that I still sing today is "The Wild Goose" by Wade Hemsworth. Hasn't been done better (or often enough for that matter) imho.

I never saw Tom Kines perform, he certainly wasn't very visible the past 25 years or so.

Bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: BACHELOR'S HALL
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 10 Aug 00 - 08:59 PM

Whew...this tune add stuff is hard work! It really makes me appriciate Dick, Susan, Joe and all the elves.

I wanted to help with the missing tunes that MMario is working on, so I immediately saw one of my favorites, Bachelor's Hall. Well, things aren't quite so simple! There are two versions in the DT, neither have tunes, and neither appears to be the version I know. So here are the words to the Jean Ritchie version. I've sent a midi (which I copied from Lesley Nelson with her permission) to Alan. Hope I sending all these to the right places.

BACHELOR'S HALL
traditional

Oh hard is my fortune and hard is my fate,
Controlled by my mother so early and late,
And when I get married just to end all the strife,
Controlled by a man for the rest of my life.

O, young men go a-courtin' they dress up so fine,
They cheat the girls up, that is all their design;
They'll titter, they'll tatter,
They'll laugh and they'll lie,
They'll cheat the girls up till they're ready to die.

When young men go a-courtin' they stay up all night,
Get out in the mornin' and look like a sight;
They saddle their horses, they rock and they reel,
Dag-gone them old girls, how sleepy I do feel!

O, bachelor's hall it is bound to be best,
Get drunk or stay sober, lay down take your rest,
No woman to scold you, no children to bawl,
So happy is the man that keeps bachelor's hall.

This is the version sung by Jean Ritchie.
MT


I moved this message here from another thread on a different topic.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 Feb 03 - 04:42 AM

The Traditional Ballad Index lists two songs with this name.

Bachelor's Hall (I)

DESCRIPTION: About the sad life of a bachelor: "Bachelor's Hall, what a queer looking place it is, Keep me from such all the days of my life." The singer describes the mess and squalor of the place, and the pitiful lives of its inhabitants.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1942
KEYWORDS: bachelor loneliness
FOUND IN: US(So)
REFERENCES (1 citation):
Randolph 475, "Bachelor's Hall" (1 text)
Notes: There is another "Bachelor's Hall" which describes the good life in the Hall: "No woman to scold you, No children to bawl, Always stay single, keep Bachelor's Hall."
As I have only one version of this text, I cannot really determine the relationship between the two -- but the present text is not in the same meter as the other.
Charles Dibdin wrote a piece called "Batchelor's Hall" in 1794, but I haven't found a text of that, either. - RBW
File: R475

Bachelor's Hall (II)

DESCRIPTION: "When young men go courting they'll dress up so fine," meet the girls, dress up -- and end up worn out, (broke), and claiming, "I believe it's the best to court none at all, And live by myself and keep bachelor's hall," where neither wife nor children nag
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1925 (recording, Fiddlin' John Carson)
KEYWORDS: courting bachelor
FOUND IN: US(SE)
REFERENCES (3 citations):
Abrahams/Foss, p. 120, "Bachelor's Hall" (1 text, 1 tune)
Darling-NAS, p. 273, "Bachelor's Hall" (1 text)
DT, BACHHALL

RECORDINGS:
Fiddlin' John Carson, "The Batchelor's Hall" (OKeh 45056, 1925; on TimesAint04 as "Bachelor's Hall")
Notes: There is another "Bachelor's Hall" which describes the difficult life in the Hall: "Sure when I think what a burning disgrace it is, Never at all to be getting a wife, See the old bachelor gloomy and sad enough...."
As I have only one version of #1, I cannot really determine the relationship between the two -- but the present text is not in the same meter as the other.
Charles Dibdin wrote a piece called "Batchelor's Hall" in 1794, but I haven't found a text of that, either. - RBW
File: AF120

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2002 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SINGLE BLESSEDNESS...BACHELOR'S HALL
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Mar 04 - 11:21 PM

This must be the song Bruce O. was referring to above.

From The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music:
^^
SINGLE BLESSEDNESS: A TRUE PICTURE OF A BACHELOR'S HALL
(Words, Thomas More. Music, T. Wood. 1855.)

Bachelor's Hall! What a quare looking place it is,
Kape me from sich all the days of my life.
Sure but I think what a burnin' disgrace it is,
Never at all to be gettin' a wife.
See the old bachelor, gloomy and sad enough,
Placing his tay kittle over the fire.
He soon tips it over. Saint Patrick! He's mad enough,
If he were present, to fight with the 'Squire.

How like a hog in a mortar bed wallowing,
Awkward enough, see him knading his dough.
Truth! If the bread he could ate without swallowing,
How he would favor his palate, you know.
Pots, dishes, pans, and such greasy commodities,
Ashes and prata skins kiver the floor.
His cupboard's a storehouse of comical oddities,
Things that had never been neighbours before.

His meal being over, his table's left sitting so.
Dishes, take care of yourself if you can.
But hunger returns, then he's fuming and fretting so.
Och! Let him alone for a baste of a man.
Late in the night when he goes to bed shiverin',
Niver a bit is the bed made at all.
He crapes like a tarapin under the kiverin'.
Bad luck to the picture of Bachelor's Hall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 08 Mar 04 - 12:28 PM

The Dibdin 'Bachelor's Hall' mentioned by Joe Offer is (rather untypically for Dibdin) a hunting song with chorus 'Hark away, hark away! All nature looks gay/ and Aurora with smiles ushers in the bright day'. It has four verses the first of which starts with 'To Bachelor's Hall we good fellows invite, to partake of the chase that makes up our delight'.

Charles Dibdin, incidentally, must come well up in the top ten of prolific songwriters.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: davidmeredith
Date: 21 Nov 04 - 09:53 AM

I have version by Dave Deighton which begins

I rode six horses plain to death
I rode them till they had no breath
I rode them till they had none at all
And the devil may take me to bachelor's hall...............


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Nov 04 - 08:53 AM

The 1st verse of the version by Jean Ritchie seems identical to the first verse of "Wagoners Lad" (as sung by the Kossoy Sisters on an Audio CD of Appalachian Music which I have).

There appear to be 2 themes here: (a) The song is actually sung by a woman who laments the free and easy attitude some young men can adopt to love; this was obviously in the days before female contraception since some present day females can give the males a run for their money in this respect (b) A comment on the squalor of the typical "bachelor pad".

As P.J. O'Rourke once wrote when comparing the relative merits of private and public ownership, anything you own yourself is usually tidier and better organised than anything public (eg public buildings, lavatories, etc). However he issued a disclaimer: "If you're a typical bachelor under 30, please ignore the last bit." (or words to that effect).

I remember Steeleye Span also did a versuion of Bachelors Hall. The ony lines I can remember were I think at the end of the chorus: "Always stay single, Keep Bachelors Hall".

A BACHELOR


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: GUEST,ebrookejenkins@yahoo.com
Date: 06 Dec 04 - 08:54 PM

Have you heard the Duhks' version of the "how hard is the fortune of all womankind"?

They're an Irish group from Manitoba. Fantastic!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: BACHELORS' HALL (Charles Dibdin)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Mar 07 - 10:38 PM

From Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, Johnson Ballads fol. 52. (They also have several copies by different printers.)

^^ BACHELORS' HALL:
Written and composed by Mr. [Charles] DIBDIN,
FOR
His ENTERTAINMENT called The ODDITIES.

To Bachelors'-hall we good fellows invite,
To partake of the chace that makes up our delight;
We have spirits like fire, and of health such a stock
That our Pulse strikes the seconds as true as a clock;
Did you see us, you'd swear, as we mount with a grace,
That Diana had dubb'd some new gods of the chace.

CHORUS: Hark away! hark away! All nature looks gay,
And Aurora with smiles ushers in the bright day.

Dick Thickset came mounted upon a fine black,
A better fleet gelding ne'er hunter did back;
Tom Trig rode a bay, full of mettle and bone,
And gaily Bob Buxom rode proud on a roan;
But the horse of all horses that rivall'd the day,
Was the 'Squire's Neck-or-nothing, and that was a grey.

CHORUS: Hark away! hark away! While our spirits are gay,
Let us drink to the joys of the next coming day.

Then for hounds there was Nimble, so well that climbs rocks,
And Cocknose, a good one at scenting a fox,
Little Plunge, like a mole who will ferret and search,
And beetle-brow'd Hawk's-eye, so dead at a lurch;
Young Sly-looks, that scents the strong breeze from the south,
And musical Echowell, with his deep mouth.

Hark away, &c.

Our horses thus all of the very best blood,
'Tis not likely you'll easily find such a stud;
And for hounds, our opinions with thousands we'll back,
That all England throughout can't produce such a pack:
Thus having describ'd you dogs, horses, and crew,
Away we set off, for the fox is in view.

Hark away, &c.

Sly reynard's brought home, while the horns sound a call,
And now you're all welcome to Bachelors'-hall;
The savory sirloin grateful smoaks on the board,
And Bacchus pours wine from his favourite hoard;
Come on, then, do honour to this jovial place,
And enjoy the sweet pleasures that spring from the chace.

Hark away, &c.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: 12-stringer
Date: 03 May 08 - 03:35 AM

Yet another version, from southern West Virginia and similar lyrically to the jb3 and Jean Ritchie texts above. This was recorded in 1929 by Roy Harvey and Earl Shirkey and released on Columbia 15429-D (as by "Roy Harper and Earl Shirkey"). Shirkey provides the vaudeville style yodeling between verses.

Keep Bachelor's Hall
(as sung by Roy Harvey)

How hard is the fortune of all womenkind
They're always controlled and they're always confined
Confined to their parents till they are made wives
Made slaves for their husbands the rest of their lives.

Washing and ironing their daily due
Darning and mending, I'll bring that in too
Four little children I have to maintain
Oh how I wish I was single again.

(yodel and guitar riff)

The first thing is Mama, I want a piece of bread
The next thing is Mama, I want to go to bed
She'll wash them and dress them and put them to bed
Saying, Oh, my Lord, how I wish I was dead

When young men go courting they dress up so fine
They'll make up and fix up and use a good line
They tiddle and tattle and make fun and lie
And keep the young girls up till they're just fit to die

(yodel)

The girls will jump up and thus they will say
Oh, boys, I'm so sleepy, I wish you'd go 'way
You're nothing but false heart and this I do scorn
Before you get home you will lodge in some barn.

All the next day you'll stagger and reel,
Saying, "God bless those sweet girls, how sleepy I feel."
If I were a young man, I'd court none at all
I'd live my days single, I'd keep bachelor's' hall.

(yodel and guitar riff)

Keep bachelor's hall for I think it's the best
Go home drunk or sober, lie down, take your rest
No wife there to scold you, no children to squawl,
I say to all young men, keep bachelor's hall.

(yodel and guitar riff)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Bachelor's Hall - clarification needed
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 03 May 08 - 12:09 PM

The poet John Clare (1793 -1864) tells us that there was a 'Bachelors' Hall' in his native village of Helpston (Northamptonshire, UK - although under Cambridgeshire since 1974).

His description is as follows:

"It was a sort of meeting place for the young fellows of the town where they usd to join for ale and tobacco & drink the night away the occupiers were two bachelors & the cottage was calld 'Bachelors Hall' it is an old ruinous hut & has needed repairs ever since I knew it for they neither mended up the walls nor thatch the roof being negligent men but quiet and inoffensive neighbours"

The two bachelor owners were the Billings brothers.

This doesn't sound like a recipe for quiet inoffensiveness to me - and it's lucky for the Billings' neighbours that this was in the days before amplified music!

I recall someone pointing this building out to me a few years ago and noting that it had been transformed into a bijou country residence.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 24 June 11:12 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 2022 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.