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Origins: Winds Blew Across the Wild Moor

DigiTrad:
MARY ON THE WILD MOOR
THE FATAL SNOWSTORM
WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR (MARY DIED AT HER FATHER'S DOOR)


Related thread:
Lyr/Tune Req: Mary of the Wild Moor (10)


Allan C. 26 Feb 17 - 10:08 AM
Allan C. 26 Feb 17 - 10:18 AM
GUEST 26 Feb 17 - 10:27 AM
Allan C. 26 Feb 17 - 10:47 AM
GUEST 26 Feb 17 - 10:50 AM
Steve Gardham 26 Feb 17 - 10:54 AM
Steve Gardham 26 Feb 17 - 10:54 AM
Steve Gardham 26 Feb 17 - 12:10 PM
Georgiansilver 26 Feb 17 - 03:46 PM
Bob the Postman 26 Feb 17 - 07:51 PM
Jim Carroll 27 Feb 17 - 03:18 AM
Steve Gardham 27 Feb 17 - 10:18 AM
GUEST,DK 27 Feb 17 - 07:03 PM
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Subject: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Allan C.
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:08 AM

I just heard this song for the first time and wonder about its provenance. The DT lyrics came from "Folk Songs Out of Wisconsin" but most songs I know that speak of a "moor" have origins in the UK.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Allan C.
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:18 AM

I believe it is also known as "Mary of the Wild Moor."


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:27 AM

The song is of English origin but was very popular in many parts of North America. Johnny Cash does a fantastic job on his "American" album, there is also a good version by Dolly Parton.
If you just search the title and add "history" , you will get quite a lot of information.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Allan C.
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:47 AM

Thank you GUEST. I did locate a little information. According to this site the origins are sketchy, but appear to be British. The site says, "From the [scant] evidence, it appears to be a 19th century English broadside hit which then travelled to America and became far more popular there than in its native land ..."


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:50 AM

There is also a great version of this by The Louvin Brothers.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:54 AM

I have seen nothing earlier than the early 19th century. Nothing definitely earlier than Pitts of London at his post 1818 address.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 10:54 AM

There are plenty of Pitts copies on the Bodleian website.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 12:10 PM

Having said that, Johnson says the words and music were old in 1845 but they did not come together as a song till 1845. There is sheet music of this date in the Levy Collection online. However Pitts died in 1844 so I would say there is every likelihood that it was being sung to some tune or other between 1818 and 1844. Looking at the other printers who put it out I'd guess a date sometime in the 1820s.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 03:46 PM

Try this..... is this what you are looking for. The Call and the Answer.


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Subject: RE: Origins: WINDS BLEW ACROSS THE WILD MOOR
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 26 Feb 17 - 07:51 PM

I always thought that the guy who wrote "Mary of the Wild Moor" had been reading "Silas Marner", which wasn't published until 1861. But maybe George Eliot was familiar with the broadside?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Winds Blew Across the Wild Moor
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 27 Feb 17 - 03:18 AM

This is a related song we recorded from a Clare singer back in the 1980s, along with the note I wrote for it.
It can be heard HERE
Jim Carroll

The Wintry Evening
Sung by Tom Lenihan, KKnockbrack, Miltown Malbay, Co Clare

As it was on a wintry evening as fast came down the snow,
O'er lofty hills and mountains the stormy winds did blow.
This damsel she came down all in the drifts of snow,
With her baby in her arms and she knowing not where to go.

She says: 'Cruel was my father that shut the door in me.
And worse was my mother that such a sight could see.'
The tears rolled down, as they fell down they freezed before they fell,
And she says: 'My cruel parents, oh, they used me worse than hell.'

She says, 'My pretty baby, your precious life is gone.
'Tis little your father knows how we are oppressed.
As cruel as his lot was, if he knew our hardship here,
He would fold us in his arms from this cold and wintry breeze.

'Come all you pretty fair maids, a warning take from me;
Never believe a false young man or anything they'll say.
For they'll kiss you and they'll court you until your favour is gained.
And they'll leave you then in sorrow forever to remain.'

"This song of a young woman with an illegitimate child being abandoned by her parents and left to the mercy of the elements, possibly originated as 'The Fatal Snowstorm', a 'sentimental and flowery piece' composed by John Embleton c.1815. It is also to be found under the title 'Month of January', as sung by Sarah Makem of Keady, Armagh, and is similar to 'Mary of the Wild Moor' (Laws P21) which Tom Munnelly recorded from Clare singers. Tom learned this version from his mother."
Jim Carroll

See also
It Being on a Cold and Stormy Night sung by Katie Droney


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Subject: RE: Origins: Winds Blew Across the Wild Moor
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 27 Feb 17 - 10:18 AM

Hi Jim,
The first 2 stanzas and the first line of the third are most definitely 'The Fatal Snowstorm' but the rest also looks familiar and probably have been spliced in from a similar piece. Notice the strict rhyming pattern falls down in the third stanza.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Winds Blew Across the Wild Moor
From: GUEST,DK
Date: 27 Feb 17 - 07:03 PM

There is probably more on this site than anyone needs to know:

http://www.justanothertune.com/index.html


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