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British-European folkies

Jack Campin 01 Apr 17 - 07:35 PM
Big Al Whittle 01 Apr 17 - 10:42 PM
Mr Red 02 Apr 17 - 03:12 AM
Will Fly 02 Apr 17 - 03:36 AM
Steve Gardham 02 Apr 17 - 08:28 AM
Big Al Whittle 02 Apr 17 - 09:13 AM
GUEST,Guest 02 Apr 17 - 09:48 AM
Big Al Whittle 02 Apr 17 - 11:05 AM
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Subject: British-European folkies
From: Jack Campin
Date: 01 Apr 17 - 07:35 PM

What British folkies have integrated themselves into other European musical cultures?

The question popped into mind while reading a post by Ross Daly, who is Irish, has lived more than half his life in Greece and has become one of the leading Greek/Ottoman musicians in the world. In the art music scene there are several British emigres who have made themselves part of musical life in another European country, like Brian Ferneyhough, William Christie or Simon Rattle.

In the folk scene I can't think of one. Bob Cohen is an American who has become one of the leading klezmer musicians in Hungary; being Anglophone isn't necessarily a barrier. And there are Europeans who have become part of the British folk scene, like George Papavgeris, Marit Falt or Flossie Malavialle. But the other way? Fraser Fifield, Barnaby Brown and Vicki Swan could undoubtedly cut the mustard in the Swedish, Sardinian and Bulgarian music scenes respectively, but they prefer to stay at home. So do all the many English players with a primary interest in French music.

So, is there a Highlander making Sicilian bagpipes or a Welshman playing Slovenian accordion that I don't know about? (and the next question, obviously, is what's going to happen to them?...)


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 01 Apr 17 - 10:42 PM

we brexiteers have decided to have them all summarily executed.


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Mr Red
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 03:12 AM

all summarily executed.

So that's my Trad French Dancing out, Cajun expunged. Swedish Polska'd. And Irish Set permanently. Ceilidhs are OK and I guess I will have to make a deal with Contra now. (a couple of Latvian sets won't bother the Brexit police).

but I stand firm on all 24 of my FAQ pages


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Will Fly
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 03:36 AM

All depends at what level we're talking about, Jack. I know several English players who live in France and play French music (as well as English music) - but not, perhaps, at a newsworthy level. Tim Broadbent is a Brighton chap (Hove, actually) who has lived in France for several years and plays all sorts of stuff with Marseille violinist Christian Fromentin.

I suppose there's a difference in simply living in and integrating into a local culture, including musically - and being a major player in that culture.


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 08:28 AM

Andy Rowse, Hungary


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 09:13 AM

well put Will!

so many people knock the debate about 'what is folk music'? but really how can you measure how much an artist has integrated into a nation's culture?

Is it someone like me whose song Rummenigge found its way in bawdy version onto the football terraces of Germany. Alan Moorhouse whose songs, reflect his several decades spent in Germany. Wizz Jones, whose song When I leave Berlin was sung by Bruce Springsteen at the fall of the Berlin wall.

and what of Jake THackeray who took a French song form and created a more English than English song form.

Germany has been infatuated with Irish music, rather in the same way Irish people love American country and western since time imemorial
- so many Irish musicians live and work there.
some people on this forum would not even allow any of the above to be folk music.


to them - people who can rattle of jigs and reels and laments with fellow celts from Dublin, Brittany and Catalonia are the truest measure of integration.

the thing is . we're closer to Paris and Berlin than SAnFRancisco is to New York - so of course. we get on. we're musicians - not politicians.

those are the buggers who cause all the trouble. we will continue to integrate whatever nonsense the politicians are kicking up.


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 09:48 AM

I think the key point is that anyone playing and living in Europe is unlikely to be known on the UK folkscene. Here in France there is nothing like the (diminishing) folk club setup, or the arts centres/small theatres that book UK folk artists, although there's a few festivals. In SW France Alison Wylie makes celtic harps and plays Irish/French repertoire in small band after decades living here.


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Subject: RE: British-European folkies
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 02 Apr 17 - 11:05 AM

well if that's the case , we ought to be the least affected peoplein Europe. Alan Moorhouse was saying he thought the break up of the EU would be a nightmare for musicians. going back to being hassled for work permits and struggling with half a dozen different sorts of currency, not to mention border inspections of gear etc.


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