Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Add: Asikatali

DigiTrad:
AZEKATARLE


Joe Offer 20 May 17 - 01:28 AM
Joe Offer 20 May 17 - 01:30 AM
Joe Offer 20 May 17 - 01:48 AM
Joe Offer 20 May 17 - 01:54 AM
rich-joy 20 May 17 - 06:56 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Lyr Add: Asikatali
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 17 - 01:28 AM

This song is in the Digital Tradition, but I'm not sure it's correct. Here's a post with lyrics from the Spinners:

Thread #99389   Message #1981121
Posted By: s&r
27-Feb-07 - 04:37 PM
Thread Name: African Folk Songs
Subject: RE: African Folk Songs

Sung by the Spinners

ASIKATALI

Asikatlai, nomasiya bozh,
Sizimitselin keluleko (2)

CH:
Unzima lumtwalo,
Ufuna madoda (2)

Tina Bantwan batse Afric',
Sizimitselin keluleko (2)

CH:
Unzima lumtwalo,
Ufuna madoda (2)

We are the children of Africa,
And it's for freedom that we're working now. (2)

CHORUS:        A heavy load, a heavy load,
And it will take some real men. (2)

We do not care if we go to prison,
It is for freedom that we gladly go. (2)

CHORUS:        A heavy load, a heavy load,
And it will take some real men. (2)

(repeat first verse and chorus)

Stu




Spinners recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJ59zXOB8NI


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Asikatali
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 17 - 01:30 AM

Here are the lyrics we have in the Digital Tradition:

AZEKATARLE

South African Liberation song, widely sung after the events in
Sharpville in 1958 when protestors were shot at and charged by
the military.
From Leon Rosselson, Roy Bailey and Frankie Armstrong.

Ah zee ka tar (le), no maz ya boz (zhwa)
See see mis ay ling koo loo lay ko
Ah zee ka tar (le), no maz ya boz (zhwa)
See see mis ay ling koo loo lay ko

Oon say ma lung twai lo
on say ma lung twai lo
Oon fo na ma to da
on fo na ma to da
Oon say ma lung twai lo
on say ma lung twai lo
Oon fo na ma to da
on fo na ma to da

Te na ban twa na ba zay ah preeka
See see mees ay ling koo loo lay ko
Te na ban twa na ba zay ah preeka
See see mees ay ling koo loo lay ko

We do not care if we got to prison
It is for freedom that we gladly go

A heavy load, a heavy load
And it will take some real strength

We are the children of Africa
It is for freedom that we gladly go

@African @freedom
filename[ AZEKTRLE
BR

Here's a performance I really like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuIBffUbWDQ

...and a more formal choral performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYZ3B6fz85E


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Asikatali
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 17 - 01:48 AM

Harmony demonstration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InhSVYAp9F0



Freedom song from South Africa - in four parts.



Asikhatali noma si bowa sizimisel' in keluleko.

Chorus: Unzima lomthwalo ufuna madoda.



V2. Thina bantwana baze Afrika sizimisel' inkeluleko.



Translation:

You can jail us but our spirits are free and we live in hope.

We walk a hard road but victory will be ours.

We are the children of Africa and we live in hope.



Although a song which was sung during the protest against apartheid regime in South Africa, the song still has a meaning today in many parts of the world.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: Asikatali
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 17 - 01:54 AM

ASIKATALI

Asikatali (Lead: Asikatal') no masiya bozh' (Basses: Bozhwa)
Sizimiseli nkululeko (2x)
Unzima lomtwalo
Ufuna madoda (2x)

Tina bantwan baseh Afrik' (Basses: Afrika)
Sizimiseli nkululeko (2x)
Unzima lomtwalo
Ufuna madoda (2x)

Singable English Translation:

Oh we don't care if we go to jail
It is for freedom that we gladly go (2x)
A heavy load, a heavy load!
And it will lake some real strength (2x)

Oh the children of Africa
Are determined to be free
A heavy load, a heavy load
And it will take some real strength

"Asikatali" is one of the many freedom songs that have been composed during South Africa's (Azania) struggle for independence and national liberation from its colonial settler rule. It was brought to the U.S. in 1959 by Mary Louise Hooper who had lived in South Africa for several years. She became acquainted with leaders of the African National Congress, and was forced to leave the country for her anti-apartheid activities.
"Asikatali" was widely sung on picket lines and at demonstrations in South Africa. It was also picked up and popularized by the civil rights movement in the 60's, since the song's refrain is equally applicable here. The origin of African freedom songs is similar to that of many civil rights songs. A good number of the early African freedom songs were adaptations of church hymns and prayers with words changed to reflect political demands and changing consciousness.
The situation in South Africa has now intensified. In a recent wave of repression, seventeen major Black organizations have been banned, the largest Black-read newspaper closed down and its editor jailed, and coordinated police strikes in major cities imprisoned hundreds of leaders of the Black consciousness movement. This crackdown occurred within a month after the police murder of Steven Biko, founder of the South African Students Organization (SASO) and deeply respected leader of the Black consciousness movement. But repression breeds resistance. In a recent television program documenting the life and work of Steven Biko, the people's determination for freedom was shown through their response to his murder. The funeral turned into a militant march of 20,000 people. And 'Asikatali" was one of the many songs sung during this program.
Other South African freedom songs can be heard on an album called This Land Is Mine:' South African Freedom Songs (Folkways FH 5588, 43 West 61 St.' NY). They were recorded in 1965 by South African refugees in Tanganyika, many of whom were members of the African National Congress which is now banned. Hopefully, in the future we'll be able to print some of the newer songs, too.

Source: Sing Out! Magazine, Vol 26, No 3, 1977, pp 30-31


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Asikatali
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 May 17 - 06:56 PM

Yes, a good song that so many of us have had in our Rep over the years! (my learning was orig. from Frankie Armstrong) ......

I also have a basic pdf score for "Unzima Lomthwalo" (aka Azikatali) by Revd James Arthur CALATA of the ANC (b1895-d1983) .... but damned if I know just WHERE online I got it from now!

Cheers,
R-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 20 April 1:02 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.