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Folk on BBC tonight & this week

Mr Red 04 Jun 17 - 04:21 AM
GUEST,henryp 04 Jun 17 - 05:04 AM
GUEST,CJB 04 Jun 17 - 04:05 PM
Bonzo3legs 05 Jun 17 - 02:41 AM
FreddyHeadey 19 Jun 18 - 01:43 PM
FreddyHeadey 06 Jul 18 - 05:37 AM
FreddyHeadey 09 Aug 18 - 11:02 AM
FreddyHeadey 10 Dec 18 - 08:26 AM
DaveRo 18 Dec 18 - 01:04 PM
Stanron 18 Dec 18 - 01:32 PM
Jack Campin 18 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Dec 18 - 02:00 PM
GUEST,Ed 18 Dec 18 - 02:25 PM
Jack Campin 18 Dec 18 - 02:43 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Dec 18 - 05:28 PM
Tattie Bogle 18 Dec 18 - 07:00 PM
GUEST 20 Dec 18 - 07:25 AM
Jack Campin 20 Dec 18 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 20 Dec 18 - 10:08 AM
FreddyHeadey 20 Dec 18 - 03:16 PM
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Subject: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Mr Red
Date: 04 Jun 17 - 04:21 AM

Tonight BBC 4 TV 11pm GMT (midnight in the UK) - "Later... Folk America".
Plant & Krauss, Johnny Cash, Emmylou, Buddy Guy.

Thursday Radio 4 Extra (6am, 12:30pm & 8pm in the UK) "Ballad Folksong: Romeo & Juliet"
re-imagined as 60s love story as a series of songs. Written by Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger singing.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 04 Jun 17 - 05:04 AM

Here's a useful link to BBC radio shows, especially Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

BBC Radio Folk Music Now and Next


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: GUEST,CJB
Date: 04 Jun 17 - 04:05 PM

Ah - Romeo an Juliet. Got a recording of that - its a great listen although the story line is very dated - remember Teddy Boys? Its not a 'folksong' per se, it is a Radio Ballad with dialogues and snatches of folk songs.

I wonder if they'll repeat the Radio Ballad 'The Iron Box' about life for blacks in US prisons.

Then there's the 6 ep. Radio Ballad series 'Off Limits' about the life of blacks in the US Army in the Vietnam War. The BBC never had the objectivity to actually air these. Only one ep. survives.

Then there is the pre-Parker/MacColl ballad opera 'The Man Who Went To War' starring Paul Robeson. This too was sponsored by the BBC. Recently it has just been rediscovered in the Library of Congress, but has been claimed by academia and is not likely to be released or aired for the public to hear.

CJB


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 05 Jun 17 - 02:41 AM

Many thanks


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 19 Jun 18 - 01:43 PM

Thanks henryp.

I've enjoyed a couple of the Caithream Ciùil programmes.
Not understanding the DJ is quite relaxing.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007jdfl/episodes/player

I found the one Tiompan I tried rather too Country for me. But I forgot to check the playlist to see who else was coming up.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007jddb/episodes/player

And Fàilt' air an Dùthaich
IS Country.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007jdfn/episodes/player


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
bbc iPlayer Radio app
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/3yvdp3zQJWLtl204z9nxgRt/download-the-iplayer-radio-app 
(then, on the programme's web page, click the '+'
then on the app click
Menu > My Radio > Listen Later)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 06 Jul 18 - 05:37 AM

"Tynemouth Sea and Song - Jez Lowe
Open Country

Up on the cliff tops at the mouth of the Tyne sits the imposing Tynemouth Priory and Castle. It's history stretches back to the Iron Age and it has been used by both Monks and the Military as a place to defend nation and faith.
This great monastic heritage may be one reason why the songs of this region have been kept alive. Jez Lowe discovers this place became a seat of learning which meant that there was a history of print; crucially songs were recorded and not lost but also the cultural influence of Christianity from Ireland and mainland Europe gave rise to a melting pot of ideas and influences.

This melting pot of influences is evident today as Jez visits the nearby Fish Quay at North Shields. The songs, and even unique instruments, from this place mix Irish, Scottish and English sounds and themes with music from as far afield as Scandinavia. Even today you can find fishermen from places like the Philippines and the Netherlands working alongside the local boatmen. Music remains ever present in the traditions of the place and Jez explores the songs and sounds which resonate most with people who live and work at the mouth of the Tyne today."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b8b7rg
25 minutes


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
bbc iPlayer Radio app
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/3yvdp3zQJWLtl204z9nxgRt/download-the-iplayer-radio-app 
(then click the '+' on the programme's web page
then on the app click
Menu > My Radio > Listen Later)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 09 Aug 18 - 11:02 AM

Tom Service talks about "folk music" to Steve Roud, Fay Hield and has some of his own ideas too.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06fs4dl 
August 2018


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 10 Dec 18 - 08:26 AM

Music Planet: Road Trip - North Carolina
BBC Radio 3
7 Dec 2018
Duration: 13m 42s

Old-style traditional musician Riley Baugus reports from the Blue Ridge Mountains with a banjo-fuelled, foot-stomping road trip through the Appalachians

play\download
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06txym1
 UK ONLY ?


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: DaveRo
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 01:04 PM

'The Truth about Chrismas Carols'
BBC4 Tonight 2000

The documentary celebrates the enduring power of the carol with a variety of performances from folk singer Bella Hardy to the choir of Truro Cathedral.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gbgt3

I wouldn't normally watch anything entitled 'The truth about..' or 'The secret of...' but this might be interesting.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Stanron
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 01:32 PM

DaveRo wrote: 'The Truth about Chrismas Carols'
BBC4 Tonight 2000
Yes I've got that listed for tonight. Immediately after Only Connect on BBC 2 and followed by James May reassembling stuff on Quest at 9.

After that I have to decide between Death in Paradise on Drama or QI on BBC 2 followed by Newsnight.

There have been worse evenings of TV.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM

Heard one last night on my wife's phone - dunno when it was originally broadcast - about the digitization of the VWML. Featured John Kirkpatrick and Billy Bragg among others.

Odd for what it left out. It's not like there weren't lots of precedents from other countries, like Tobar an Dualchais/Kist o Riches in Scotland, the LoC's Living Memory project in the US, ITMA in Dublin, Bartok's archives in Budapest. Instead the producer pretended the whole idea was English.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 02:00 PM

So if I ran a programme on the National Art Gallery or the Tate I'd have to mention all the other art galleries in the world as well. Interesting concept!


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 02:25 PM

Jack,

The programme you heard was Digital Folk first broadcast in 2013.

Well worth a listen in my opinion. As Steve Gardham notes, it's a little unfair to complain that a broadcast about what's happened in England is actually about what's happened in England...


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 02:43 PM

It's only polite to give credit where it's due, isn't it? The VWML were following in a path laid down by others - just as Cecil Sharp was, and the programme implied he was a pioneer, too.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 05:28 PM

Agreed on Sharp. He could probably be considered a pioneer in collecting Appalachian folk songs, but certainly not English. Baring Gould, Kidson and Broadwood beat him to it by a decade.

Did Kist and ITMA precede Take 6 in digitising? It can't have been by much if they did.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 07:00 PM

The carols programme was good and interesting: missed the rest, wrapping presents and writing cards!


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 07:25 AM

The Folklorist
Seth Lakeman, travels to New York to meet the man regarded as the world's leading expert on folk music, 85-year-old Izzy Young, who opened his first Folklore Center in New York's Greenwich Village in 1957.

The store in MacDougal St became a focal point for the American folk music scene of the time. Bob Dylan writes in his memoirs about spending time at the Center, which he referred to as "The citadel of Americana Folk Music - like an ancient chapel". Dylan met Dave Van Ronk in the store, and Izzy Young produced Dylan's first concert at Carnegie Chapter Hall in 1961. Dylan wrote a song about the store and Young called "Talking Folklore Center".

After developing an interest in Swedish folk music at a festival, Young closed his New York store and in 1973 he moved to Stockholm where he opened the Folklore Centrum, where he still works seven days a week.

Making a rare return to New York, 40 years since he first left, Izzy joins Seth on the steps of 110 MacDougal St in Greenwich Village - the site of his original Folklore Center – to reminisce about the evocative days in the late 50s and early 60s when, as Bob Dylan recalls, "Folk music glittered like a mound of gold".

Wandering up MacDougal Street to Washington Square Park, Izzy describes the events of April 1961, when `Folkies' staged what would later be referred to as `the first protest action of the 60s'. When city officials tried to ban folk musicians from performing in the square, Izzy was the main organiser of a protest that resulted in clashes with local police. The protestors eventually won their legal battle with the city and music has been permitted in the square ever since.

Producer: Des Shaw
A Ten Alps production for BBC Radio 4

first broadcast August 2013

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0381fzj


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 09:36 AM

Somebody here must have known Izzy, surely?


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 10:08 AM

Joe Locker knew him and the late Tom Paley had some good stories about him also from his New York and Swedish days. Somebody once asked Tom how well Izzy was doing in Sweden. Tome replied to the effect that he was doing a great job at losing money just as well as he did in New York.


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Subject: RE: Folk on BBC tonight & this week
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 03:16 PM

till 12 Jan 2019

Digital Folk
England's vast wealth of folk music heritage has finally been put online. Named "The Full English", it includes rare archives found in the basement of London's famous Cecil Sharp House and a dozen other collections. Songs that haven't been heard for a hundred years are now being sung again and are already inspiring a new generation of musical writers and artists.

English Folk Dance and Song Society (Efdss) librarian Malcolm Taylor has gathered together manuscripts of early 20th century songs that were once scattered across the country and placed them on one searchable internet portal. These are songs collected in the early 20th century by the likes of Cecil Sharp, Vaughan Williams and Percy Grainger who set out, notebook in hand, to record the songs sung by ordinary folk up and down the country.

Now a whole new wave of artists is clicking on to the digital archives. Singer Billy Bragg has previously used them for his own musical inspiration and folk musicians Fay Hield, Nancy Kerr and Martin Simpson are now doing it too, as they create new music from old sources.

The programme also hears from playwrights Nell Leyshon and Lee Hall (of Billy Elliott fame) who have been drawn into an exploration of the ethics of how the songs were originally collected and published.

Our guide to the remarkable 'The Full English' collection is John Kirkpatrick, one of the giants of the British folk scene and BBC Radio 2 Folk Musician of 2010.

Producer: Chris Eldon Lee
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4


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