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Industry Songs

GUEST 09 Nov 17 - 10:30 AM
GUEST,henryp 16 Nov 17 - 05:32 AM
GUEST,henryp 16 Nov 17 - 07:20 AM
Bobelix 16 Nov 17 - 11:49 AM
Bobelix 16 Nov 17 - 11:52 AM
Bobelix 16 Nov 17 - 11:54 AM
GUEST,Chris Moore 16 Nov 17 - 01:19 PM
Steve Gardham 16 Nov 17 - 02:06 PM
Bobelix 16 Nov 17 - 02:12 PM
Dave Hanson 16 Nov 17 - 03:11 PM
Steve Gardham 16 Nov 17 - 03:16 PM
GUEST,left handed guitar 16 Nov 17 - 03:36 PM
Bobelix 16 Nov 17 - 09:01 PM
r.padgett 17 Nov 17 - 02:18 AM
Bobelix 17 Nov 17 - 10:53 PM
r.padgett 18 Nov 17 - 04:12 AM
Jim Carroll 18 Nov 17 - 04:21 AM
Bobelix 18 Nov 17 - 12:25 PM
Jim Carroll 18 Nov 17 - 12:40 PM
Jim Carroll 18 Nov 17 - 12:46 PM
Brian Peters 18 Nov 17 - 12:52 PM
FreddyHeadey 18 Nov 17 - 02:09 PM
Jim Carroll 18 Nov 17 - 02:33 PM
Bev and Jerry 18 Nov 17 - 09:34 PM
dick.hamlet 19 Nov 17 - 12:08 AM
Brian Peters 19 Nov 17 - 06:13 AM
Andrez 19 Nov 17 - 06:58 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 17 - 07:07 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 17 - 07:15 AM
GUEST 19 Nov 17 - 03:35 PM
Bobelix 19 Nov 17 - 08:05 PM
Bobelix 19 Nov 17 - 08:08 PM
GUEST,banksie 21 Nov 17 - 04:08 AM
David C. Carter 21 Nov 17 - 05:13 AM
Jim Carroll 21 Nov 17 - 05:33 AM
JHW 23 Nov 17 - 04:55 PM
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Subject: Songs about Industry
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Nov 17 - 10:30 AM

I've decided to do a programme for my Transatlantic Conversations show on Celtic Music radio on songs, from both sides of the Big Water, about industry, alive or declining/dead. Suggestions please?

Bob Leslie


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Subject: ADD: Cranedriver (Julie Matthews)
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 05:32 AM

BBC 2006 Radio Ballads; The Song of Steel

CRANEDRIVER
(Julie Matthews)

Me brother said I don't believe it still
They're taking on women at the rolling mill
So I went down and I put in me name
When I turned 18 I was a crane driver
Turned 18 I was a crane driver

With a gentle touch upon the wheel
Make no mistakes with red hot steel
12 hour shifts, me take home pay
£9 a week for a crane driver
£9 pay for a crane driver

In me black battle dress I was as plain as a mouse
So I sewed on buttons to match me blouse
Pink one day and blue the next
It's warm work for a crane driver
Warm work for a crane driver

I'd tap me foot to the drop hammer
Waiting for the whistle to move that steel
Way up here I'm the queen of the foundry
'Til the boys come home I'm a crane driver
The boys come home I'm a crane driver

Publishing: Circuit Music Ltd


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Subject: ADD: Old Hammerhead (Jez Lowe)
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 07:20 AM

OLD HAMMERHEAD
(Jez Lowe - Lowe Life Music © 1990)

Old Hammerhead weeps when the wind blows.
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
High above our houses,
The last Wear Water crane,
And we heard him cry for help
and we denied him in our shame,
And we huddled in the darkness of his shadow.

Who will come and help me,
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
I've watched and I've protected you,
Now who will do the same,
I've kept you from starvation,
Deprivation's burning rain,
And you've flourished and survived here in my shadow.

I've watched these streets surround me,
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
Swarms of tiny children
have gathered round me at their games,
And I've watched them change from playgrounds,
To windy lovers' lanes,
As they fondled and kissed there in my shadow.

You always told me I'd be needed,
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
I stood by you in hundreds
As you fought in freedom's name,
And better ships no other yard
Could ever hope to claim,
Than them that slipped to the river in my shadow.

But now I stand alone here,
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
You say my use is over
And that progress is to blame
And the pride of these yards,
You say will never rise again,
And no saviour will step out from my shadow

They're coming for to take me now,
Old Hammerhead cried in vain,
With savage blade and cutting tool
Of fearsome burning flame.
They'll cast lots for my engine,
And divide my mighty frame,
And they won't even leave me with my shadow.

NOTE: The original recording of this song, on the 1990 album BRIEFLY ON THE STREET, featured only Jez and violinist Chris Leslie, now of Fairport Convention. The Bad Pennies never performed the song until 2002, in a new arrangement. It was recently recorded in Australia by a good friend of the group, Margaret Walters on her album Power In a Song.


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Subject: RE: North American Locomotive-industry songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 11:49 AM

Bob Leslie here - no longer a guest! I've decided to revise my proposition and do a programme on industry songs both sides of the Atlantic. These two will be great additions to that - I managed what I think is a pretty fair splice job on the Julie Matthews song and now have a version without the talking. If anyone's interested, I can post it somewhere for download.
I'll start a new thread now on "Industry Songs" - please feel free to post suggestions!


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Subject: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 11:52 AM

I've decided to do a programme for my Transatlantic Conversations show on Celtic Music radio on songs, from both sides of the Big Water, about industry, alive or declining/dead. Suggestions please?


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 11:54 AM

They don't need to be in English - Gaelic, Spanish, Welsh, Breton, whatever!


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: GUEST,Chris Moore
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 01:19 PM

Steelmen by Ron Angel of the Teesside fettlers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNJC1-lnIyw


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 02:06 PM

There are lots of collections of industrial songs published on both sides of the pond.

MacColl--Shuttle & Cage
Coal mining song books by the likes of A.L.Lloyd and George Korson
Steel Industry in Teesside by Graham Miles.
There must be plenty in the DT. Try some key words in the search box.

Try on the Bodleian Broadside website by putting key words in to the search box, factory, mining, steel, canals, docks, engineer, navvy etc.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 02:12 PM

Any specific recordings I should be looking for? It's for a radio programme.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 03:11 PM

' 100 Songs of Toil ' edited by Karl Dallas, excellent book of industrial folk songs.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 03:16 PM

Try our website. www.yorkshirefolksong.net There are some industrial song recordings available there. If you decide to use any of them an appropriate donation to the website would be helpful but not compulsory.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: GUEST,left handed guitar
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 03:36 PM

Here s a few suggestions for songs that I think may work, though not all are traditional:

Cotton Mill Girls - I believe Hedy West did thiis

Nine pound hammer

Dark as a dungeon

Schoolday's Over - a poignant mining song by Ewan McCall

Aragon Mill -Si Kahn

Brother can you spare a dime


Calico Silver by Michael Murphy - a beautiful song that tells of the rise and fall of
   a silver mine in the old West. Worth hearing.

All of these can be found on YouTube.
I hope this is helpful.
-


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 16 Nov 17 - 09:01 PM

THAT's what I'm looking for! I'm really pressed for time, so actual tracks by actual people are really helpful. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: r.padgett
Date: 17 Nov 17 - 02:18 AM

Keep that wheel a turning ~ s/b on Yorkshire folk song db (sung by me!)

Ray


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 17 Nov 17 - 10:53 PM

I think I might have found that one already all by myself! It's the one on YouTube with the guy turning what looks like a ship's wheel?


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: r.padgett
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 04:12 AM

Yea Ballad of William Brown aka ~ from the Big Red Book

Ray


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Subject: ADD: Clayton Aniline Song (Pete Smith)
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 04:21 AM

Still brings a lump to the throat after all these years
Jim Carroll

THE CLAYTON ANILINE SONG
(Pete Smith, Mancester mid 1960s)

1 Been working at dyework for nearly five years ,
Been charging the naptha's that give yer the **pap,
They send it from *ICKY for us to shove in
This **vitrol and chloric as makes us all thin.

2 Well I rise up for Clayton at five in the morn,
And for smoke and for fumes, yer can't see the dawn,
I'm relievin' old Albert, he's been here all night,
The poor old bugger looks barely alive.

3   His chest is sunk in and his belly's popped out out,
And believe me, my friends,! t's not bacco or stout -
It's the **napthas and paras have rotted his bowels,
While making bright colours for Whitsuntide clothes.

4 I gave him my ****milk ration and packed him off home,
I' ve five tons of this naphtha to charge on me own,
I'm wet through with steam and the sweat of me back
And through wieldin' this shovel, I'm beginning to crack.

5 Well I'm damned if I'll work in this hole any more,
For my belly feels tight and my chest is right sore-
I think of old Albert his face white and drawn,
He'll be back here tonight and just prayin' for dawn.

*       I.C.I.- Imperial Chemical Industries nicknamed "ICKEY'
**      Chemicals for dye-making
**      Paploma of the bowel - cancer caused by fumes from dyestuff manufacture
**** A pint of milk was given to each worker each day to 'ward off' cancer.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 12:25 PM

Re Aniline song: That looks great! But I can't seem to find any recordings or videos of it. Anyone got a spare mp3?


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 12:40 PM

I don't know if abybody sings it other than me or Pete Smith
MacColl was once going to record it.
At a pinch, I can send you my rendition from 1969, but it's nottt my finest hour
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 12:46 PM

Alternatively, I could e-mail you a copy of the music if you PM me an e-mail address
I'd love to be responsible for putting this great song back into circulation
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Brian Peters
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 12:52 PM

The 60s LPs 'Deep Lancashire' and 'Owdham Edge', now available on one CD, have plenty of great industrial songs. So does Harry Boardman's 'Golden Stream', but it's hard to get hold of. Try Youtube or Spotify and search for Harry.

A few people have recorded 'Cropper Lads' including Swan Arcade - great version. 'Handweaver & Factory Maid' by Steeleye Span and others, of course.

MacColl's 'Four Loom Weaver' shouldn't be hard to find.

Tyneside songs by Tommy Armstrong - there seem to be some on Spotify.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 02:09 PM

Transatlantic Conversations
with Bob Leslie
Sundays, 14:00 - 16:00

http://www.celticmusicradio.net/radioplayer/


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 02:33 PM

Another superb song sung to Star of County Down tune (but slower)]
Jim Carroll

HAND LOOM VERSUS THE POWER LOOM
Come all you cotton weavers, your looms you may pull down.
You must get employment in factories, in country or in town.
For our cotton masters have a wonderful new scheme:
These calico goods now wove by hand, they're going to weave by steam.

In comes the gruff o'er looker, or the masters will attend.
It's "You must find another shop or quickly you must mend.
Such work as this will never do, so now I'll tell you plain:
We must have good pincop-spinning or we ne'er can weave by steam."

There's sow-makers and dressers and some are making warps.
These poor pincop-spinners they must mind their flats and sharps.
For if an end slips under, as sometimes perchance it may,
They'll daub you down in black and white and you've a shilling to pay.

In comes the surly winder. Her cops they are all marred.
They are all snarls and soft bad ends, for I've roved off many a yard.
I'm sure I'll tell the master or the joss when he comes in.
They'll daub you down and you must pay, so money comes rolling in.

The weavers' turn will next come on, for they must not escape.
To enlarge the master's fortune, they are fined in every shape.
For thin places or bad edges, a go or else a float,
They'll daub you down and you must pay three pence or else a groat.

If you go into a loom shop where there's three or four pairs of looms,
They all are standing empty, a-cluttering up the rooms.
And if you ask the reason why, t'ould mother will tell you plain:
"My daughters have forsaken them and gone to weave by steam."

So come all you cotton weavers, you must rise up very soon,
For you must work in factories from morning until noon.
You mustn't walk in your garden for two or three hours a day,
For you must stand at their command and keep your shuttles in play.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 18 Nov 17 - 09:34 PM

Here's the set list we use for our "History of the Industrial Revolution" workshop:

1. Ten & Nine (Jute Mill Song)
2. Poverty Knock
3. Doffing Mistress
4. Springhill Disaster
5. Black Waters
6. The L&N Don't Stop Here
7. Peg and Awl
8. Aragon Mill
9. Boss's Lament
10. Soldiers of Industry (we wrote this)

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: North American Locomotive-industry songs
From: dick.hamlet
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 12:08 AM

Harry Robertson: Ship Repairing Men

Chorus:

Don't wait up for me this evening; I'll be out all night again.
Working on the Brisbane River with the ship repairing men.

http://unionsong.com/u488.mp3


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Brian Peters
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 06:13 AM

"Another superb song sung to Star of County Down tune (but slower)]"
HAND LOOM VERSUS THE POWER LOOM

That's interesting, Jim, Harry Boardman sang this to a different tune. Did someone else sing to 'Star of Co. Down'?

It's certainly a fine industrial broadside.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Andrez
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 06:58 AM

For consideration. I knew Colin in Melbourne in the early 70's and often heard him sing this. It ticks every box for me.

Factory Lad (Turning Steel) by Colin Dryden ?Colin Dryden 1969. Here a recording at the link below. Cut and paste into a browser. Also a bio by his niece Naomi Dryden Smith.

https://soundcloud.com/nomeshome/factory-lad-turning-steel-by

http://nomeshome.tumblr.com/post/56916558706/colin-dryden-not-your-average-uncle


Factory Lad (Turning Steel)

You wake up in the morning, the sky's as black as night,
Your mother's shouting up the stairs, you know she's winning the fight,
You hurry to the breakfast table and grab a bite to eat,
Then out the door and up the road, and through the factory gate.

Chorus:
Turning steel how do you feel, as in the chuck you spin.
If you felt like me you'd roll right out and never roll back in.

Cold and dark the morning as you squeeze in the gate.
As you clock in, the bell will ring - eight hours is your fate.
Off comes the coat and up go the sleeves and "right lads" is the cry.
With one eye on the clock, the other on your lathe, you wish that time could fly.

But time can't fly as fast as a lathe, and work you must -
The grinding, groaning spinning metal, the hot air and the dust.
And many's the time I'm with me girl and we're walking through the park,
While gazing down at the spinning steel or the welder's blinding spark.

Well, old Tom, he left last week - his final bell did ring.
His hair as white as the face beneath his oily sunken skin.
But he made a speech and he said "good-bye" to a life time working here,
As I shook his hand, I thought of hell - a lathe for forty years.

When my time comes, as come it must, why then I'll leave this place.
I'll walk right out past the chargehand's desk and never turn my face.
Out through the gates, into the sun, and I'll leave it all behind,
With but one regret for the lads I've left, to carry on the grind.


Please let me low if you decide to use it, for interests sake only.

Cheers,

Andrez


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 07:07 AM

"Did someone else sing to 'Star of Co. Down'?"
I've always sung it to that tune, even before I heard Harry sing it
I never liked his tune - too joggy for my interpretation of the text
I got the tune from Denis Turner - I think it was included on the Waterloo Peterloo album.
I always intended to put a tune to Surat Weaver's Lament - an interesting insight into the Cotton Famine at the time of the American Civil War by WEaver poet Samuel Laycock (a fine example of worker songwriting - to make a sly point on another subject)
The tune given is 'Rory O'More' (which I don't know) but it shouldn't be too hard to find another.
Jim Carroll

TH' SHURAT WEAVER'S SONG.
CONFOUND it! aw ne'er wur so woven afore,
Mi back's welly brocken, mi fingers are sore;
Aw've bin starin' an' rootin' among this Shurat,
Till aw'm very near getten as bloint as a bat.

Every toime aw go in wi' mi cuts to owd Joe,
He gies mi a cursin', an' bates mi an' o;
Aw've a warp i' one loom wi' booath selvedges marr'd,
An' th' other's as bad for he's dress'd it to hard.

Aw wish aw wur fur enuff off, eawt o' th' road,
For o' weavin' this rubbitch aw'm gettin' reet stow'd;
Aw've newt i' this world to lie deawn on but straw,
For aw've only eight shillin' this fortni't to draw.

Neaw aw haven't mi family under mi hat,
Aw've a woife an' six childer to keep eawt o' that;
So aw'm rayther among it at present yo see,
Iv ever a fellow wur puzzled, it's me!

Iv one turns eawt to steal, folk'll co me a thief,
An' aw conno' put th' cheek on to ax for relief;
As aw said i' eawr heawse t' other neet to mi woife,
Aw never did nowt o' this sort i' mi loife.

One doesn't like everyone t' know heaw they are,
But we'n suffered so long thro' this 'Merica war,
'At there's lot's o' poor factory folk getten t' fur end,
An' they'll soon be knock'd o'er iv th' toimes don't mend.

Oh, dear! iv yon Yankees could only just see
Heaw they're clemmin' an' starvin' poor weavers loike me,
Aw think they'd soon settle their bother, an' strive
To send us some cotton to keep us alive.

There's theawsands o' folk just i' th' best o' their days,
Wi' traces o' want plainly seen i' their face;
An' a future afore 'em as dreary an' dark,
For when th' cotton gets done we shall o be beawt wark.

We'n bin patient an' quiet as long as we con;
Th' bits o' things we had by us are welly o gone;
Aw've bin trampin' so long, mi owd shoon are worn eawt,
An' mi halliday clooas are o on 'em "up th' speawt."

It wur nobbut last Monday aw sowd a good bed?
Nay, very near gan it?to get us some bread;
Afore these bad times cum aw used to be fat,
But neaw, bless yo'r loife, aw'm as thin as a lat!

Mony a toime i' mi loife aw've seen things lookin' feaw,
But never as awk'ard as what they are neaw;
Iv there isn't some help for us factory folk soon,
Aw'm sure we shall o be knocked reet eawt o' tune.

Come give us a lift, yo' 'at han owt to give,
An' help yo're poor brothers an' sisters to live;
Be kind, an' be tender to th' needy an' poor,
An' we'll promise when th' times mend well ax yo no moor.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 07:15 AM

Sorry - meant to include the information about Surat cotton
Jim Carroll

Surat
Sea Island (also known as extra long staple), grown on the islands off the Carolina coast of America, was the best quality cotton; Egyptian; the name given to Sea Island cotton that had been successfully introduced into Egypt, was the second best grade. The most common grades were the short staple American cottons which included Middling Orleans. It was these grades that were used by the majority of Lancashire's calico producers. The Surat cottons from India were the least suitable for machinery and were only ever used as a small percentage of a mixture as the fibres were short and broke easily.
Surat came in smaller bales which contained stones and other impurities. Each town in Lancashire used different mixtures and when the supply of American and Sea Island Cotton dried up, the mill owners moved over to Surat. Some machines could be adjusted to take the Surat, but extra humidity was needed to reduce breakages. Running a loom on Surat could only produce about 40% of the previous throughput and, as workers were paid by the piece, their income was slashed.
Mill owners were also in difficulty as many of the smaller family-owned mills were heavily mortgaged and if they stopped running the owners would fall behind with payments. Shopkeepers had no sales and could not afford the rents. Workers defaulted on their rents, and the landlord who stood the loss was often the millowner.[citation needed] The wealthier mill owners such as Henry Houldsworth, were confident that the famine was only temporary and were planning ahead for the new more efficient larger machinery that was becoming available, it was during the famine (1863?65) that he built Houldsworth Mill, Reddish, the first of the next generation of larger mills, and at the time the world's largest mill with 138,000 spindles.
But with most raw cotton unavailable, mill owners had to either close mills and attempt to help the workers financially, use inferior cotton or bring new cotton into production.


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Subject: RE: North American Locomotive-industry songs
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 03:35 PM

These last few months I've been performing The Erie Canal Song (or Low Bridge, Everybody Down) which laments the decline of Mule Power and the related work and culture as the Steam Engine proved more efficient, and became the dominant technology to move goods along the waterways. I know this is not what you're looking for, Bob, but a bigger picture look at change in what drives an industry. Maybe there's a later song that laments the decline of the RR Steam Engine.

A song that came to mind reading this thread is Brother Can You Spare a Dime? (Gorney/Harburg, 1930)

Once I built a railroad
Made it run
Made it race against time
Once I built a railroad
Now it's done
Brother, can you spare a dime?

Not quite what you're talking about either, but a bit of that sweep of history, of economic change.

I live in a small city with an active freight line running through it. (I'm 64 now and have rarely lived where I couldn't hear the freight trains moving through at night; it's like a lullaby to me. When I was a kid our family lived very close to the RR tracks - on the "wrong side" of the tracks but I didn't figure this till years later.) This city was once a hub in the Upper Midwest for the Northern Pacific Railroad where they built and repaired locomotive engines and other RR cars. There's a nice diagram of the railyards in 1888 near the top of this page to give a sense http://www.crowwinghistory.org/nprr.html The RR has since changed hands multiple times and now by volume mostly moves oil and coal. The railyards still look kinda cool but are greatly diminished physically. Some developers are working with the current RR, Burlington Northern Santa Fe* (BNSF), to develop the site for a mix of retail, service and commercial businesses. The old Roundhouse is long gone, but there's now a Roundhouse Brewery in one of the remaining buildings. They just brought back their very nice Driftbuster Winter Ale in November. Anywho, I do go on. I will poke around for local songs about locomotive and train car production, decline of at least the steam locomotive industry. There are a couple of history buffs I know who might have some ideas.

*This reminds me that I used to do a decent cover of Johnny Mercer's On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe in open G tuning. Time to revive that song.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 08:05 PM

Thanks, everyone, for all the help - it's been invaluable. When I first expressed an interest in doing a show, it was suggested that I prepare a pilot based on a theme; so I came up with the idea of Transatlantic Conversations, tracing musical links and parallels on both sides of the Big Water.
Little did I realise that the research involved would take up so much of my time.
Juggling that with my playing/writing/rehearsing/recording activities AND trying to have a social life would have been impossible without Mudcat (and Mainly Norfolk, The Library of Congress, Youtube, and Francis Child!).
Once more, many, many thanks!
Bob Leslie


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Bobelix
Date: 19 Nov 17 - 08:08 PM

PS Does anyone know of similar chat groups in other countries with a historically sizable immigrant population in N. America?


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: GUEST,banksie
Date: 21 Nov 17 - 04:08 AM

There is another great Ron Angel song, The Chemical Worker's Song. Try this version by Great Big Sea.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSiRWHXz6Ps


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: David C. Carter
Date: 21 Nov 17 - 05:13 AM

Homestead Steel.....Tom Russel.

You can find it on Youtube.


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 21 Nov 17 - 05:33 AM

This, for me was one of the great new industrial songs
It was written in a hurry for the Festival of Fools show the Critics Group put on each year (an annual show made up of sketches based largely on press cuttings of the years events).
Ewan had written a sketch which the actors/singers had trouble learning, so he scribbled this off as a replacement
Jim Carroll

WE ARE THE ENGINEERS
by Ewan MacColl

Two joined hands was our device when our banner first unfurled,
Hands that knew the feel of tools and helped to build a world.
Two hands became a million hands and fashioned down the years
The machines that make the world go round,
The ships and planes and the diesel trains
The weaving frames and the building cranes,
We are the engineers!

We tamed the fire and harnessed metals, learned a thousand skills,
Our hands have made the tools men use in factories, mines and mills;
Ours the hands that throw the switch that puts the world in gear
That makes the plows that turn the soil,
And the ships and planes and the Diesel trains,
The weaving frames and the building cranes,
We are the engineers !

Jails and transportation hulks faced union pioneers;
Police and spies at every turn, a world of doubt and fear,
Our union sprang from poverty, from hunger, blood and tears,
But we fought the cruel laws
And when we lost, we rose to fight again
For the right to work and live like men,
We are the engineers !

We've stamped our feet in the morning queues, known unemployment's toll;
Known hands go soft in idleness, the slow death on the dole;
The rusty lathe and the silent factory mark the hungry years,
And the grass growing green on the shipyard floor,
And the endless beat of marching feet
And men demanding the right to eat
And work as engineers !

And we, the youngest engineers, now march to claim our rights;
For we have learned that nothing's ever won without a fight.
Every battle fought and won reveals a new frontier,
And a world to be won by those who build
The Ships and planes and the diesel trains,
The weaving frames and the building cranes,
We are the engineers !


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Subject: RE: Industry Songs
From: JHW
Date: 23 Nov 17 - 04:55 PM

Plenty from Graeme Miles.
From memory

We've seen the last of the Cleveland miners
Farewell young William, so long young Tom,
They've stashed their gear away for good now
The age of iron has been and gone

Now there were few smiles upon their faces,
They'd very little or nowt to say
They said that some were nigh in tears
Some shook their heads and turned away

Now the wind'll whine among those workings
And through the rafters the sun'll play
Those spoil tips soon will all grow over
With weed and bramble and crumble away

Those winding sheds will fall in ruin
Those tall stone chimneys will do the same
Those shafts and tunnels will fill with water
Those engine houses will let in rain

So farewell Lingdale and Kilton too
Goodbye North Skelton, you were the last
We've seen an end to the Cleveland mining
An age of iron has come and passed.

                                     Graeme Miles


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