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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Raggytash 16 Jun 21 - 07:00 AM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Jun 21 - 05:26 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jun 21 - 11:19 AM
Donuel 14 Jun 21 - 09:41 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Jun 21 - 07:27 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jun 21 - 04:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jun 21 - 12:34 PM
Sandra in Sydney 11 Jun 21 - 07:19 AM
Donuel 09 Jun 21 - 08:16 AM
Sandra in Sydney 08 Jun 21 - 08:54 PM
Donuel 08 Jun 21 - 05:26 PM
Donuel 08 Jun 21 - 12:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Jun 21 - 12:21 PM
Donuel 08 Jun 21 - 12:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 08 Jun 21 - 07:11 AM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jun 21 - 12:03 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jun 21 - 12:00 PM
Sandra in Sydney 07 Jun 21 - 11:47 AM
Stilly River Sage 29 May 21 - 11:43 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 29 May 21 - 11:41 AM
Sandra in Sydney 29 May 21 - 11:33 AM
Stilly River Sage 29 May 21 - 11:18 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 29 May 21 - 08:16 AM
Sandra in Sydney 28 May 21 - 08:01 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 May 21 - 06:45 PM
Donuel 28 May 21 - 08:46 AM
Sandra in Sydney 28 May 21 - 04:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 May 21 - 11:50 AM
Donuel 22 May 21 - 08:29 AM
Sandra in Sydney 22 May 21 - 06:59 AM
Sandra in Sydney 22 May 21 - 06:36 AM
Jack Campin 22 May 21 - 02:58 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 May 21 - 12:10 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 May 21 - 04:57 PM
Sandra in Sydney 19 May 21 - 07:49 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 May 21 - 06:15 PM
Sandra in Sydney 18 May 21 - 10:17 PM
Donuel 18 May 21 - 08:18 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 May 21 - 09:43 AM
Donuel 17 May 21 - 09:22 AM
Donuel 17 May 21 - 07:52 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 May 21 - 02:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 May 21 - 01:00 AM
Sandra in Sydney 16 May 21 - 10:01 PM
Sandra in Sydney 30 Apr 21 - 08:43 PM
Sandra in Sydney 30 Apr 21 - 04:16 AM
Bill D 24 Apr 21 - 05:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Apr 21 - 03:08 PM
Donuel 24 Apr 21 - 12:47 PM
Steve Shaw 22 Apr 21 - 10:32 AM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Jun 21 - 07:00 AM

Brilliant SRS!!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Jun 21 - 05:26 AM

brilliant, I've shared it with some doll-collecting friends.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jun 21 - 11:19 AM

Have you read the lovely piece of fiction about the Smithsonian Barbie? The place I picked up this text thinks it's real, it isn't, but it IS charming. :)

Smithsonian Institute
207 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC 20078

Dear Mr. Williams:

Thank you for your latest submission to the Institute, labeled "93211-D, layer seven, next to the clothesline post... Hominid skull." We have given this specimen a careful and detailed examination, and regret to inform you that we disagree with your theory that it represents conclusive proof of the presence of Early Man in Charleston County two million years ago.

Rather, it appears that what you have found is the head of a Barbie doll, of the variety that one of our staff, who has small children, believes to be "Malibu Barbie." It is evident that you have given a great deal of thought to the analysis of this specimen, and you may be quite certain that those of us who are familiar with your prior work in the field were loathe to come to contradiction with your findings. However, we do feel that there are a number of physical attributes of the specimen which might have tipped you off to its modern origin:

1. The material is molded plastic. Ancient hominid remains are typically fossilized bone.

2. The cranial capacity of the specimen is approximately 9 cubic centimeters, well below the threshold of even the earliest identified proto-homonids.

3. The dentition pattern evident on the skull is more consistent with the common domesticated dog than it is with the ravenous man-eating Pliocene clams you speculate roamed the wetlands during that time.

This latter finding is certainly one of the most intriguing hypotheses you have submitted in your history with this institution, but the evidence seems to weigh rather heavily against it. Without going into too much detail, let us say that:

A. The specimen looks like the head of a Barbie doll that a dog has chewed on.

B. Clams don't have teeth.

It is with feelings tinged with melancholy that we must deny your request to have the specimen carbon-dated. This is partially due to the heavy load our lab must bear in its normal operation, and partly due to carbon-dating's notorious inaccuracy in fossils of recent geologic record. To the best of our knowledge, no Barbie dolls were produced prior to 1956 AD, and carbon-dating is likely to produce wildly inaccurate results.

Sadly, we must also deny your request that we approach the National Science Foundation Phylogeny Department with the concept of assigning your specimen the scientific name Australopithecus spiff-arino. Speaking personally, I, for one, fought tenaciously for the acceptance of your proposed taxonomy, but was ultimately voted down because the species name you selected was hyphenated, and didn't really sound like it might be Latin.

However, we gladly accept your generous donation of this this fascinating specimen to the museum. While it is undoubtedly not a Hominid fossil, it is, nonetheless, yet another riveting example of the great body of work you seem to accumulate here so effortlessly. You should know that our Director has reserved a special shelf in his own office for the display of the specimens you have previously submitted to the Institution, and the entire staff speculates daily on what you will happen upon next in your digs at the site you have discovered in your Newport back yard.

We eagerly anticipate your trip to our nation's capital that you proposed in your last letter, and several of us are pressing the Director to pay for it. We are particularly interested in hearing you expand on your theories surrounding the trans-positating fillifitation of ferrous ions in a structural matrix that makes the excellent juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex femur you recently discovered take on the deceptive appearance of a rusty 9-mm Sears Craftsman automotive crescent wrench.

Yours in Science,

Harvey Rowe
Chief Curator-Antiquities




Here's the Snopes story about how it came about. It's a great piece of epistolarial fiction.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Jun 21 - 09:41 AM

While not archaeology this is worthwhile thead drift.
250 million year old life
This gives panspermia a shot in the arm.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 07:27 PM

one of my friends bought an inner-city house way back in the 90s, it had been an inn, built c.1860 when his suburb was an outlier of Old Sydney Town, & he found horseshoes & giant nails, & a very modern small plastic doll in his dig!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 04:52 PM

Good luck with that, Maggie. Mrs Steve had bunion issues big time about 20 years ago and it was a tough time. She's been wearing nice loose shoes and sandals ever since. I get mixoid cysts on both big toes (and on one thumb). They spoil the look of my otherwise beautiful feet ;-) but they don't hurt. As for archaeology, I dug out a patch of grass yesterday, right next to one side of the house, that's been there (as far as I know) since the house was built 130 years ago. I want to make a bigger car parking area next to the house and am laying down the same gravel that covers the rest of the drive. I was delighted to find that the site was underlaid with the rubble from the construction of the house, so hardcore wasn't needed. But I did unearth several iron objects, pins, nails, rings, that sort of thing, and an ancient pair of scissors. I assume they were all to do with the building of the house. On a more sinister note, there was also a pretty large limb bone, right next to the house wall. I assume it's from a big dog, but I didn't investigate it further. I wondered why you'd bury your dog right under the house wall...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 12:34 PM

I had one bunion and scheduled surgery to fix it before it was so bad that they'd have to break any bones. I'm very careful about the shoes I wear now; no heels, and with plenty of room (not falling off loose, but not so tight as I sometimes wore).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 11 Jun 21 - 07:19 AM

UK - Medieval fashion for pointy shoes linked to rise in bunions


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 09 Jun 21 - 08:16 AM

Sure the Romans made the trip, so did the Egyptians or they traded with the Romans to get things like cocaine. Asians walked there.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 08:54 PM

Shackled adult & child skeletons unearthed in Roman necropolis in France

Roman shipwreck in South America


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 05:26 PM

Slavery has been ubiquitous in most ancient societies. There is an intellectual arguement for slavery in civilization, seperate from race but often not, but even I find it difficult to be a devil's advocate for such a notion. Slavery on an uber scale hasn't been used in over


75 years.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:39 PM

From imagination alone I picture the sides of the pyramid with glass smooth flowing water reflecting the sun with 98% blinding reflectivity.

Much of the work probably was in building the man made waterways to get all the materials to the contruction site.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:21 PM

Back to the remarks about slaves, I got that information from archeologists working at San Juan Island Natl. Historical Park at English Camp, where there was a long gentle slope down to the water where the small fortifications were built. The group was doing a grid of core samples into the area because it was the locations of a pre-European settlement village and there was a huge middens. If in the course of twisting down to get a sample (at least 6-10 feet deep, as I recall) they hit human bone they tented the area off and dug down. They said that people discarded in the middens would have been slaves.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:04 PM

`In our lifetimes the secrets of the great pyramid regarding the transportation and contruction are 99% solved. Even the labor division, food, beer and competition of over 2,000 expert laborers along with their families over 25 years has been worked out from the smallest teams of 40 to larger groups.
The inner rough stone with morter and rubble and the outer carved stone with passages are completly different in the way they were lifted. The next problem of lifting the stone was done with 2 ratcheted sloping galleries that lifted inner stone and the outer spiral ramp, stone was lifted up to 425 feet for the outer structure. Stone came by boats 200 feet away either on their deck or for larger stone slung underneath.
95% of the remains of a hydraulic ram pump for water is also a feature of the great pyramid that is not totally understood as to how and why it was used. One theory is it supplied water for an underground canal ceremony or irrigation. The whole structure is more of a public utility than a tomb.

All but one grand gallery with ratcheted lifting capacity has been directly explored. At this point density data only suggests where it is. Could there be more left undiscovered? Sure but I am satisfied how it was done.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 07:11 AM

wow!

oops I hadn't seen it (blush)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jun 21 - 12:03 PM

This was a link on the side of your last page, Sandra: Roman ruins in Yorkshire are a first of their kind.

And I re-upped in my quarterly donations to the Guardian.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jun 21 - 12:00 PM

One assumes that the evidence is rare, slavery wasn't.

Pacific Northwest coastal tribes enslaved members of other tribes (defeated in battle) from the area; I think slaves could work their way out of the status but if they didn't, chances are that anyone who died a slave ended up buried in the middens, not in some other ceremonial location.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 07 Jun 21 - 11:47 AM

Shackled skeleton identified as rare evidence of slavery in Roman Britain


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 May 21 - 11:43 AM

A mixedblood friend wrote several novels from the point of view of tribal people here in the US. In one he had the Southwestern reservation residents concocting a scheme to move back into some of the historic dwellings, in costume, and charge a lot of money admittance to the white tourists who wanted to see the Indians in their natural habitat. That way they could all put the latest appliances in their nearby modern homes and simply take turns doing their costumed stint at the historic village.

Native/aboriginal people aren't museum pieces. Colonization changed each continent and we all live in the the twenty-first century. Proving a link to art 27,000 years old requires DNA, not simply a few pots of yellow paint stored out in the garage.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 29 May 21 - 11:41 AM

I may have added SOME Aboriginal clans, SRS, but otherwise that was not a daft post at all - I got distinctions at uni for "Pre-Colonial Aboriginal Society" and "Aborigines and the State".

No need to say what you are or even what letter it begins with.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 May 21 - 11:33 AM

Culturally, art can be renewed if it has custodians who have the knowledge to do so. Legally that would be vandalism, but it is all right for Govt regulations to allow big business - miners, etc. to destroy it.

Sometime back I read an article about an Indigenous man being fined for renewing art in his Country, but I can't find the article but found this instead - Why Australia's Aboriginal rock art will disappear

John Meredith - miscellaneous photos and artifacts He was one of our earliest folklore collectors & also researched Aboriginal rock art.
Between 1948 & 1951 John Meredith & Brian Loughlin located & drew Aboriginal rock carvings which led to an article in Walkabout in 1951. Merro's meticulous drawings are held by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. (Keith McKenry's biography of John Meredith, pp.91-94)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 May 21 - 11:18 AM

Aboriginal clans renew theirs regularly.

I agree with Dave and others. You are daft.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 29 May 21 - 08:16 AM

Not sure about all ochre paintings but gather it depends on the location, however I am sure that Aboriginal clans renew theirs regularly.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 May 21 - 08:01 PM

there are lots of references to the news article/press release, this is the only one I could find with links to further info

Syria, Tell Banat - scholarly references


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 May 21 - 06:45 PM

I haven't been out of North America either. We have a wide-ranging set of similar interests.

They Syrian monument is shown in the article, and the bodies are described - I do wonder how they know how the bodies are placed without taking the monument apart? I'm guessing it wasn't a huge mound of dirt piled, by the basketful, on top of the bodies, but some other burial arrangement.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 28 May 21 - 08:46 AM

In the Amazon we have found only 16 sites with wonderful cliff paintings. Paintings of giant seabirds that have gone extinct in the meantime was on one cliff. Carbon dating of the ochre paint spilled on a stump tested at 27 thousand years old. The most recent was 12 thousand.

Maggie you seem to have had so many mirrored experiences that I can relate to, its surreal. However sadly I have never been outside the north american continent.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 May 21 - 04:05 AM

Site in Syria could be world’s oldest war memorial, study finds


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 May 21 - 11:50 AM

I've poked around the the Herkimer area; that rock is hard to break up to get the clear quartz. I decided to buy a couple of pretty pieces in the gift shop. (I learned about that quartz in a geology class, so when I was working in the New York area for a few years I made plans to go by there.)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 22 May 21 - 08:29 AM

In NYS near Herkimer I found 50 carots of Herkimer diamonds in matrix.
https://www.google.com/search?q=herkimer%20diamonds&oq=herkimer+diamonds&aqs=chrome..69i57j0i457j0l3j46i175i199i395i422i424j0i39


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 22 May 21 - 06:59 AM

3 amazing tombs -
Warrior Burial Is Scythian Amazon Girl No Older Than 13

Examining the Stunning Treasures in the Siberian Valley of the kings reconstructed clothes & lots of gold

Siberian Ice Maiden who died of breast cancer


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 22 May 21 - 06:36 AM

here in the Land oo Oz we are also losing 'unnecessary' university departments & courses but I can't find the article I read recently.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Jack Campin
Date: 22 May 21 - 02:58 AM

Real on-the-ground archaeology news: the University of Sheffield wants to shut down its archaeology department. Which is one of the most important in the UK.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 May 21 - 12:10 AM

Crater of Diamonds State Park

Google search on Crater of Diamonds images.

The thing about this place is that these are diamonds just as much as those found in Africa, but (maybe it's on the site) DeBeers never authenticated or maybe the Arkansas folks refused to join the diamond cartel, but the Arkansas diamonds aren't counted in the same way as the mined ones from Africa.

https://arktimes.com/sponsored/visit-arkansas/2017/04/06/visitor-finds-7-44-carat-diamond-at-arkansass-crater-of-diamonds-state-park


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 May 21 - 04:57 PM

Because glass and all sorts can be cut with them, of course!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 May 21 - 07:49 PM

diamonds!! ooohhh

much better than medieval shoes or pottery shards


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 May 21 - 06:15 PM

I reminds me of reading about the area inside Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas. They go in with a bulldozer after rainstorms and turn the soil so more stuff can come to the top. Park visitors go out in gear for mud and sift through the soil for diamonds.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 May 21 - 10:17 PM

infill from 19th-21st century work on the Thames banks contains very interesting items.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 18 May 21 - 08:18 PM

When waterways get dredged, new gets mixed with old so artifacts can turn up that aren't expected.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 May 21 - 09:43 AM

speaking of riverbeds - Mudlarking on the Thames
Listen to interviews with London's top mudlarks and see their collections

a google search on 'Thames mudlarks' gives zillions of results & lotsa' videos & pictures of their finds


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 May 21 - 09:22 AM

Excellent links Sandra. I only discovered Messy Nessie a month ago while researching Liebensborn. The results have been most satisfying.

River beds are a treasure trove whether its on Earth or Mars. :^/


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 May 21 - 07:52 AM

I have been watching the series 'First Footprints' about the 50,000 year old rock paintings in Australia. They are more amazing than the French caves imo.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 May 21 - 02:39 AM

Messy Nessy - Blogging on the Off-Beat the Unique and the Chic It's a treasury of interesting articles & sites. I can spend hours there looking at articles, then the articles mentioned below, then ....


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 May 21 - 01:00 AM

The Amsterdam one was interesting, but those outhouses were certainly worth a look. And that model of the Mississippi - quite an idea in it's day. Too bad it's such a mess now, you'd think they'd figure out a way to bring new life to a project like that.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 May 21 - 10:01 PM

scroll to no. 8- What was found from an archeology dig in Amsterdam

Below the surface - Amsterdam Metro dig finds approximately 700,000 objects found from 119,000 BC to 2005 when the dig started. Click on each pic for a description - from 119000 BC seashells to a 2005 spinning top!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 30 Apr 21 - 08:43 PM

Trove of Bronze Age jewellery discovered

Sculpture of mystery king dating back 3,000 years found in Israel (2018 story)

Discovery of ancient Aboriginal burial ground (2018 story) last par - Despite the community's concerns, global miner Rio Tinto has assured Mapoon residents a clear process is already in place to ensure the mine works with traditional owners to identify and manage cultural heritage. Last year Rio Tinto legally destroyed 46,000yo rock shelters in another state


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 30 Apr 21 - 04:16 AM

Pregnant Egyptian mummy I checked out a lot of articles trying to find best pics - here are a few others

https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1429740/archaeology-news-pregnant-ancient

Archaeology & history articles

and a bonus not about Egyptian mummies - Nazi gold (almost) found


URL fixed in Nazi gold article. ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 05:58 PM

I lived in St. Louis one Fall semester at college, but had never heard of it not far on the other side of the river. I guess in 1959, not many others had.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 03:08 PM

I think the ancient city of Cahokia has largely gone unconsidered, when compared to the large stone edifices built in the south of Mexico, in Central America, and in the northern reaches of South America. But it was impressive and large in contrast to just about anything around (though there were some large communities with mounds down along the southern Mississippi River also).

What Doomed the Great City of Cahokia? Not Ecological Hubris, Study Says

Excavations at the city, famous for its pre-Columbian mounds, challenge the idea that residents destroyed the city through wood clearing.

A thousand years ago, a city rose on the banks of the Mississippi River, near what eventually became the city of St. Louis. Sprawling over miles of rich farms, public plazas and earthen mounds, the city — known today as Cahokia — was a thriving hub of immigrants, lavish feasting and religious ceremony. At its peak in the 1100s, Cahokia housed 20,000 people, greater than contemporaneous Paris.

By 1350, Cahokia had largely been abandoned, and why people left the city is one of the greatest mysteries of North American archaeology.

Now, some scientists are arguing that one popular explanation — Cahokia had committed ecocide by destroying its environment, and thus destroyed itself — can be rejected out of hand. Recent excavations at Cahokia led by Caitlin Rankin, an archaeologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, show that there is no evidence at the site of human-caused erosion or flooding in the city.


The story is a lot longer, find the rest at the link.

There isn't a lot to be seen from above on Google Earth but if you search Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site you'll see a 360o photo from the tallest mound.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 12:47 PM

Over here paleontologist heaven is in Nebraska for the millions of easy to recover mamallian fossils. (with help from native Americans).
Dino fossils are further west washed up in amalgams of multiple animals from when glacial dams broke and flooded what we now call the bad lands.

Ask Rap about the beautiful places among the badlands.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Apr 21 - 10:32 AM

The Campanian Ignimbrite, a super-eruption in the Bay of Naples 39000 years ago, probably played a part. Most of the caldera is submerged under the sea, but there are still fumaroles, boiling mud pools and bradyseism in the area. It's an entertainingly dangerous place of the Yellowstone ilk. If it goes off again it won't be a few thousand Neanderthals, but the three million people in and around Naples who may be doomed.


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