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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM
Sandra in Sydney 16 Sep 21 - 08:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Sep 21 - 11:56 PM
Sandra in Sydney 09 Sep 21 - 01:55 AM
Sandra in Sydney 08 Sep 21 - 10:46 PM
Donuel 08 Sep 21 - 06:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 02:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 12:59 PM
Rain Dog 22 Aug 21 - 06:18 AM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Aug 21 - 10:42 PM
Sandra in Sydney 02 Aug 21 - 05:06 AM
Rain Dog 02 Aug 21 - 02:27 AM
Sandra in Sydney 01 Aug 21 - 09:46 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jul 21 - 09:20 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jul 21 - 06:46 AM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Jul 21 - 11:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jul 21 - 10:36 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Jul 21 - 09:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Jul 21 - 11:39 AM
Sandra in Sydney 14 Jul 21 - 11:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM
Donuel 10 Jul 21 - 10:02 AM
Sandra in Sydney 10 Jul 21 - 05:52 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Jul 21 - 02:10 PM
Bill D 08 Jul 21 - 01:58 PM
Donuel 07 Jul 21 - 03:30 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jul 21 - 12:40 PM
Donuel 02 Jul 21 - 12:06 PM
Donuel 30 Jun 21 - 09:39 PM
Sandra in Sydney 29 Jun 21 - 08:07 PM
Raggytash 16 Jun 21 - 07:00 AM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Jun 21 - 05:26 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jun 21 - 11:19 AM
Donuel 14 Jun 21 - 09:41 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Jun 21 - 07:27 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jun 21 - 04:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jun 21 - 12:34 PM
Sandra in Sydney 11 Jun 21 - 07:19 AM
Donuel 09 Jun 21 - 08:16 AM
Sandra in Sydney 08 Jun 21 - 08:54 PM
Donuel 08 Jun 21 - 05:26 PM
Donuel 08 Jun 21 - 12:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Jun 21 - 12:21 PM
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Sandra in Sydney 08 Jun 21 - 07:11 AM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM

Here's a worm you won't want to meet in your travels. (One reason why armchair travel is a safer option.)

"The man was plagued by an unknown species related to the Guinea worm, one that may have recently jumped from reptiles to humans."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM

I found this wonderful story (sorry, it's music in the BS section) down at the bottom of the page: ‘We’re like Mork and Mindy!’ Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, music’s odd couple. :) This makes me happy!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM

and now for something a little bit different - Dinosaur fossil with ‘totally weird’ spikes in skeleton stuns experts


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM

lots of good info around, including in my stash of archaeology magazines. Since lockdowns started last year I've been grabbing magazines when I see them as supplies of any overseas magazines are erratic, when is why I had a stash of 6 unopened magazines! I only have 4 now. Some folk might spend their money on alcohol or shoes, I spend mine on magazines!

When lockdown ends & "unessential" businesses re-open I'll take all my read magazines (at least a dozen) to a charity shop where a retired volunteer used to go on digs (BC, of course, everything is BC in the world now) & eagerly devours them before putting them out for sale.

I also have friend who used to go on digs & is sorely missing them. She was due to go back to Greece last year ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM

Good articles, Sandra!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 21 - 08:50 PM

Scientists find evidence of humans making clothes 120,000 years ago

Study by Yale University Experts Proves Vinland Map is a Hoax

The Posthumous Disgrace of the Dark Master of Archaeological Hoaxes


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Sep 21 - 11:56 PM

Trying again (too many windows open before):

Piles of animal dung reveal the location of an ancient Arabian oasis is a for-profit site that aggregates science articles. So I went looking and found this, with more information, but still not the whole story.

Abstract
Aim
Dryland ecosystems, such as those in southern Arabia, are particularly vulnerable to climate and land-use change. Aridification and human subsistence changes at the end of the Holocene Humid Period at 6–4 ka have been used as an iconic example for evaluating such impacts to resilience of arid systems. Although records of ancient environments can provide critical insight into the biotic and abiotic mechanisms that alter ecosystems, traditional archives, such as lake deposits, are not common in southern Arabia after 6 ka; thus, we must use alternative archives.

Location
Yemen.

Taxon
Plants; Rock Hyrax (Procavia capensis).

Methods
We use fossil pollen and stable isotopes (d15N; d13C) of rock hyrax (P. capensis) middens from Wadi Sana, Yemen, to look at changes in ecosystem structure and function across this key transition from 6 ka to the present. A total of 17 middens were radiocarbon-dated and stable isotopes were measured. Of these, pollen was extracted from hyraceum of 14 middens and identified using a light microscope. Fossil pollen assemblages were then compared to existing modern pollen samples from throughout Arabia.

Results
During the mid-Holocene from at least 6 to 4.7 ka, the pollen flora reflects a landscape with abundant tropical trees. These included foundational woody taxa, such as Terminalia and Boswellia sacra (frankincense), which had a strong positive influence on local hydrology and the economy, respectively. Increased charcoal abundances also suggest that wildfire occurred periodically.

Main conclusions
Connections with archaeological evidence suggest a strong link between human management and the presence of Terminalia woodland during the mid-Holocene. These may have promoted increased groundwater storage and ponding as regional rainfall was decreasing. The mid-Holocene expansion of Boswellia sacra (frankincense) may have helped support resin trade that became a critical export from the region. Fires were more common than today, suggesting semi-arid but continuous vegetation cover across what is now bare ground. Finally, after 1 ka, increased sedge abundances at the expense of grasses and trees suggest the development of desert conditions.


It turns out this may be a very old story, because another link I found is this: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281474114_Early_Arabian_Pastoralism_at_Manayzah_in_Wadi_Sana_Hadramawt

I've accidentally deleted this page once, so I'll submit this message and sort it out later. What I find interesting is the archaeological information found in the middens of small desert animals. The same is true of packrat middens in the US desert southwest.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 09 Sep 21 - 01:55 AM

oops, a little typo?

many thankyous


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 10:46 PM

links I sent to a friend recently. For a few years she has spent holidays participating in excavations overseas & had been looking forward to a trip to Greece last year, & no doubt would have found one this year too!

https://dustyoldthing.com/first-pregnant-egyptian-mummy/

https://dustyoldthing.com/5th-century-bohemian-graves/

https://dustyoldthing.com/spanish-stonehenge-uncovered/

https://dustyoldthing.com/processional-chariot-pompeii/

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/aug/05/australian-mathematician-discovers-applied-geometry-engraved-on-3700-year-old-tablet

UC discovers princely tombs near 'Griffin Warrior' Startling find adds to amazing story of powerful Greek figure

New evidence of a Roman road in the Venice Lagoon

Human remains in tomb are best-preserved ever found in Pompeii



Fixed the Guardian/mathematician link. ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 06:25 PM

Australian 'cave ' paintings here compared to elsewhere further down


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 02:18 PM

Lots of these stories are turning up today.

Trove of 239 Rare Gold Coins Discovered in Walls of French Mansion
Renovators discovered a hidden box and pouch stuffed with rare gold coins, minted during the reigns of French Kings Louis XIII and Louis XIV

Beginning in 2016, all treasures discovered in France automatically became property of the state. However, since the mansion owners purchased the property in 2012, they have the rights to sell their finds, reports France 3. Per French law, the proceeds from the sale will be split in half, with half going to the married couple who owns the property and half to be split evenly among the three discoverers.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM

Mysterious Stone Balls Found in Deteriorating Scottish Tomb
Dating back some 5,500 years, the polished stone balls could’ve been used as weapons.

Archaeologists working in the Orkney Islands of Scotland have uncovered two polished stone balls dating back to the Neolithic.

The stone balls were found inside the Tresness stalled cairn, an early Neolithic tomb located on Sanday, one of dozens of islands in Scotland’s Orkney archipelago. It’s a significant discovery, as only a small handful of these prehistoric balls have ever been found in a burial context.

“A cracking find from the tomb!,” tweeted team co-leader Hugo Anderson-Whymark, an archaeologist with National Museums Scotland (NMS), on August 18 after his team found the first of the two balls. “Only 20 or so Neolithic polished stone balls have been found in Orkney and few have been recovered from secure contexts,” he added.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 12:59 PM

The nomad guide who decodes the Sahara's secrets

By the 16th Century, more people – 100,000 – lived in Timbuktu than lived in London


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 22 Aug 21 - 06:18 AM

Thanks for the links Sandra.

You have to love archaeologists. From the article itself:

"may be the preserved remains of cheese making"

"the possible remains of a failed attempt of cheese making"

"preliminary guess is that it could be the failed result of cheese making"

And the headline to the article is:

"Burnt cheese casts light on 3,000 year-old family drama"

I watched the last two episodes of

Archaeology: A Secret History. Presented by Dr. Richard Miles.

It was originally broadcast in 2013 but i missed it then.

Archaeology: A Secret History


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Aug 21 - 10:42 PM

prehistoric cheese!


& from the same site - Egtved girl, & lots more


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Aug 21 - 05:06 AM

the exhibition might bring them out, especially as the Museum values them & their finders.

Back in the 70s when I was wandering along a beach, I found a worn piece of glass & a not-so-worn ceramic piece so I thought I might have a look at them. They live on a plastic plate at the end of my bath along with other finds picked up over the decades, including several other bits of glass & ceramics & a little bit of pumice(?) I don't remember where or when I found them, apart from a piece of coral which was in a street planter near a shop that sold mixed bags of pretty shells! Some kid must have tossed it away as it wasn't pretty.

getting back to our topic - another Guardian story Fruit baskets from fourth century BC found in ruins of Thonis-Heracleion


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 02 Aug 21 - 02:27 AM

Saw that link and video yesterday and found it very interesting. I also liked the prominence given to the 'amateurs' who report their finds. Makes you wonder what other artefacts are tucked away in various cupboards and drawers.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 01 Aug 21 - 09:46 PM

Doggerland: Lost ‘Atlantis’ of the North Sea gives up its ancient secrets A virtual tour of the exhibition Doggerland: Lost World in the North Sea, which will be physically available to visit until 31 October, can be viewed on the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden’s YouTube channel

The guided tour is amazing - especially the graphic at the end showing the effect for the Netherlands of the projected 9 metre rise in sea level in 700-800 years!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jul 21 - 09:20 PM

oops, I don't always test links, but I tested this one!

Ancient Roman ship laden with wine jars discovered off Sicily


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jul 21 - 06:46 AM

2,300-year-old solar observatory awarded Unesco world heritage status


Link fixed. ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Jul 21 - 11:08 PM

Who Were These Vikings Buried Sitting Upright?
What Comforting Items Did Vikings Have That Are Still the Height of Luxury Today
Norse Warrior Took Comfy Duvet (and a Beheaded Owl) to the Afterlife

Thanks for posting it, Stilly, I was so busy reading these articles & many other related articles yesterday that altho I saw an article about Tolland man, I didn't read it. I spent a lot of time down that rabbit hole.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jul 21 - 10:36 PM

In the frugal last meal of a man 2,400 years ago, scientists see signs of human sacrifice
A study of the gut of a well-preserved body from a bog in Denmark has offered new details that researchers say hint at dark rituals.

I haven't read it all, but I wanted to pass it along before I lose track of the page.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Jul 21 - 09:14 PM

stilly, I did wonder when I started reading the article if the conclusion (the King slept here!) was pseudoscience, but the final par showed it was a real excavation/archaeological project.

Another article with a link to the survey Anchor Church Caves: Anglo-Saxon Home and Oldest House in Britain? ... Archaeologists from Wessex Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Institute of the Royal Agricultural University (RAU) recently joined forces to survey of the Anchor Church Caves in the English county of Derbyshire, listed as a grade II building. The results of this new study have been published in the Proceedings of the UBSS (University of Bristol Spelaeological Society)

When I started reading this I also wondered if was wish-fulfillment - The Quest to Understand Haliphat’s Speaking Handshapes but Plato in the 5th century BC mentioned sign language used by "dumb" people.

Now when did I start this post? It's definitely time to get back to stuff I need to do, no more browsing on interesting (time wasting???) sites!

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Jul 21 - 11:39 AM

Sandra, I pulled up that location on Google Earth. If you follow the link to the story about the church where Hardulph is buried, you see:      
This has to be one of the most important churches in the two counties if not in the whole of the UK because of its unique Saxon carvings – but more on that later. This church is dramatically sited on a limestone hill being cut-away by the quarry below and can be seen for many miles.

The second sentence is vague with its subjects - which is visible for miles - the church or the hill or the quarry? Google Earth confirms that there is a large and currently active quarry with various levels in view. It's almost wrapped on three sides by that excavation.

Your article says the project is looking at 170 sites - in England? The UK? That's a lot of caves. I've read about caves in China and Tibet (some of them very difficult to reach), in Italy and other parts of Europe. In the Middle East (full of Dead Sea scrolls). Interesting that I never really thought about caves getting much use in the UK (though I've always known about Fingal's Cave, of musical fame).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 14 Jul 21 - 11:07 PM

Derbyshire cave house identified as ninth-century home to exiled king


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM

This was a link from that article about "Faces of the dead" - A Maryland attic hid a priceless trove of Black history. Historians and activists saved it from auction.
Among the artifacts is an account of escape from enslavement that is among the oldest ever found


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 10 Jul 21 - 10:02 AM

The work had to include skimming the molton slag from atop the liquid iron. There are huge mounds of it that now resemble volcanic glass.
The place is now like a mountain park with plaques and tours of the master's house. We kind of avoid that mountainous area along with Fort Dettrich in Frederick that has the level 3 bio warfare labs. The evil in that area that would hatch out if the dead could talk is overwhelming.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 10 Jul 21 - 05:52 AM

Faces of the dead emerge from lost African American graveyard Bones of enslaved furnace workers tell the grim story of their lives.

links to related stories are included - at least 6, I think, I lost count. Then I went to google for more information & pictures.

sandra (overwhelmed)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Jul 21 - 02:10 PM

Something more to love about the Tuareg region.

Years ago I was listening to All Things Considered and they did a story about Ali Farka Toure, who is from that region. I poked around on the map to find out more about it (fascinating history and archeology) and I immediately ordered the CD they talked about (Niafunke).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Jul 21 - 01:58 PM

I don't remember this being posted before. It is fascinating to see evidence of 'art' by people even older than most known civilizations.
Giraffe carvings in the Sahara


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Jul 21 - 03:30 PM

That made me wonder about the credibility of the pre Neanderthal discoveries of Dragon Man and the recent Isreali discovery.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jul 21 - 12:40 PM

There is an inaccurate Facebook meme out there identifying this as a "10,000 year old hidden library." It was walled up, apparently, but the New Yorker had a story about it a number of years ago that is a good antidote to the click bait piece.

A Secret Library, Digitally Excavated

Just over a thousand years ago, someone sealed up a chamber in a cave outside the oasis town of Dunhuang, on the edge of the Gobi Desert in western China. The chamber was filled with more than five hundred cubic feet of bundled manuscripts. They sat there, hidden, for the next nine hundred years. When the room, which came to be known as the Dunhuang Library, was finally opened in 1900, it was hailed as one of the great archaeological discoveries of the twentieth century, on par with Tutankhamun’s tomb and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The library was discovered by accident. In the early Middle Ages, Dunhuang had been a flourishing city-state. It had also long been famous as a center of Buddhist worship; pilgrims travelled great distances to visit its cave shrines, comprised of hundreds of lavishly decorated caverns carved into a cliff on the city’s outskirts. But by the early twentieth century, the town was a backwater, and its caves had fallen into disrepair. Wang Yuanlu, an itinerant Taoist monk, appointed himself their caretaker. One day, he noticed his cigarette smoke wafting toward the back wall of a large cave shrine. Curious, he knocked down the wall, and found a mountain of documents, piled almost ten feet high.


This is the debunking article about the Facebook nonsense.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Jul 21 - 12:06 PM

A month ago I claimed we have a fundamental understanding as to the construction of the great ancient stone structures but no one was contentious enough to scream BS!
As we know the devil is in the details

There are villains to modern archeology and we know who they are.

I came across 'Nigel Guy' who is one of the most affectionate sarcastic speakers I have ever heard...While making no claims but posing good questions, ladies and gentlemen I present
what...wait

where's the audience?

There were several conundrums I was unaware of.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 30 Jun 21 - 09:39 PM

Woof! Virus archeology sounds wicked. Our pandemic is 1 to 3% deadly, 1918 was 5% deadly and the black death was 33% fatal. Earlier plagues are unknown. There is plenty of permafrost that's melting to release some very old bugs.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Jun 21 - 08:07 PM

Discovery of Black Death bacterium in 5,000-year-old body shows ancient roots of medieval plague (The Black Death, bubonic plague 1347 - early 1350s with many reappearances)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Jun 21 - 07:00 AM

Brilliant SRS!!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Jun 21 - 05:26 AM

brilliant, I've shared it with some doll-collecting friends.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jun 21 - 11:19 AM

Have you read the lovely piece of fiction about the Smithsonian Barbie? The place I picked up this text thinks it's real, it isn't, but it IS charming. :)

Smithsonian Institute
207 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC 20078

Dear Mr. Williams:

Thank you for your latest submission to the Institute, labeled "93211-D, layer seven, next to the clothesline post... Hominid skull." We have given this specimen a careful and detailed examination, and regret to inform you that we disagree with your theory that it represents conclusive proof of the presence of Early Man in Charleston County two million years ago.

Rather, it appears that what you have found is the head of a Barbie doll, of the variety that one of our staff, who has small children, believes to be "Malibu Barbie." It is evident that you have given a great deal of thought to the analysis of this specimen, and you may be quite certain that those of us who are familiar with your prior work in the field were loathe to come to contradiction with your findings. However, we do feel that there are a number of physical attributes of the specimen which might have tipped you off to its modern origin:

1. The material is molded plastic. Ancient hominid remains are typically fossilized bone.

2. The cranial capacity of the specimen is approximately 9 cubic centimeters, well below the threshold of even the earliest identified proto-homonids.

3. The dentition pattern evident on the skull is more consistent with the common domesticated dog than it is with the ravenous man-eating Pliocene clams you speculate roamed the wetlands during that time.

This latter finding is certainly one of the most intriguing hypotheses you have submitted in your history with this institution, but the evidence seems to weigh rather heavily against it. Without going into too much detail, let us say that:

A. The specimen looks like the head of a Barbie doll that a dog has chewed on.

B. Clams don't have teeth.

It is with feelings tinged with melancholy that we must deny your request to have the specimen carbon-dated. This is partially due to the heavy load our lab must bear in its normal operation, and partly due to carbon-dating's notorious inaccuracy in fossils of recent geologic record. To the best of our knowledge, no Barbie dolls were produced prior to 1956 AD, and carbon-dating is likely to produce wildly inaccurate results.

Sadly, we must also deny your request that we approach the National Science Foundation Phylogeny Department with the concept of assigning your specimen the scientific name Australopithecus spiff-arino. Speaking personally, I, for one, fought tenaciously for the acceptance of your proposed taxonomy, but was ultimately voted down because the species name you selected was hyphenated, and didn't really sound like it might be Latin.

However, we gladly accept your generous donation of this this fascinating specimen to the museum. While it is undoubtedly not a Hominid fossil, it is, nonetheless, yet another riveting example of the great body of work you seem to accumulate here so effortlessly. You should know that our Director has reserved a special shelf in his own office for the display of the specimens you have previously submitted to the Institution, and the entire staff speculates daily on what you will happen upon next in your digs at the site you have discovered in your Newport back yard.

We eagerly anticipate your trip to our nation's capital that you proposed in your last letter, and several of us are pressing the Director to pay for it. We are particularly interested in hearing you expand on your theories surrounding the trans-positating fillifitation of ferrous ions in a structural matrix that makes the excellent juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex femur you recently discovered take on the deceptive appearance of a rusty 9-mm Sears Craftsman automotive crescent wrench.

Yours in Science,

Harvey Rowe
Chief Curator-Antiquities




Here's the Snopes story about how it came about. It's a great piece of epistolarial fiction.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 14 Jun 21 - 09:41 AM

While not archaeology this is worthwhile thead drift.
250 million year old life
This gives panspermia a shot in the arm.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 07:27 PM

one of my friends bought an inner-city house way back in the 90s, it had been an inn, built c.1860 when his suburb was an outlier of Old Sydney Town, & he found horseshoes & giant nails, & a very modern small plastic doll in his dig!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 04:52 PM

Good luck with that, Maggie. Mrs Steve had bunion issues big time about 20 years ago and it was a tough time. She's been wearing nice loose shoes and sandals ever since. I get mixoid cysts on both big toes (and on one thumb). They spoil the look of my otherwise beautiful feet ;-) but they don't hurt. As for archaeology, I dug out a patch of grass yesterday, right next to one side of the house, that's been there (as far as I know) since the house was built 130 years ago. I want to make a bigger car parking area next to the house and am laying down the same gravel that covers the rest of the drive. I was delighted to find that the site was underlaid with the rubble from the construction of the house, so hardcore wasn't needed. But I did unearth several iron objects, pins, nails, rings, that sort of thing, and an ancient pair of scissors. I assume they were all to do with the building of the house. On a more sinister note, there was also a pretty large limb bone, right next to the house wall. I assume it's from a big dog, but I didn't investigate it further. I wondered why you'd bury your dog right under the house wall...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jun 21 - 12:34 PM

I had one bunion and scheduled surgery to fix it before it was so bad that they'd have to break any bones. I'm very careful about the shoes I wear now; no heels, and with plenty of room (not falling off loose, but not so tight as I sometimes wore).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 11 Jun 21 - 07:19 AM

UK - Medieval fashion for pointy shoes linked to rise in bunions


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 09 Jun 21 - 08:16 AM

Sure the Romans made the trip, so did the Egyptians or they traded with the Romans to get things like cocaine. Asians walked there.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 08:54 PM

Shackled adult & child skeletons unearthed in Roman necropolis in France

Roman shipwreck in South America


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 05:26 PM

Slavery has been ubiquitous in most ancient societies. There is an intellectual arguement for slavery in civilization, seperate from race but often not, but even I find it difficult to be a devil's advocate for such a notion. Slavery on an uber scale hasn't been used in over


75 years.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:39 PM

From imagination alone I picture the sides of the pyramid with glass smooth flowing water reflecting the sun with 98% blinding reflectivity.

Much of the work probably was in building the man made waterways to get all the materials to the contruction site.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:21 PM

Back to the remarks about slaves, I got that information from archeologists working at San Juan Island Natl. Historical Park at English Camp, where there was a long gentle slope down to the water where the small fortifications were built. The group was doing a grid of core samples into the area because it was the locations of a pre-European settlement village and there was a huge middens. If in the course of twisting down to get a sample (at least 6-10 feet deep, as I recall) they hit human bone they tented the area off and dug down. They said that people discarded in the middens would have been slaves.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 12:04 PM

`In our lifetimes the secrets of the great pyramid regarding the transportation and contruction are 99% solved. Even the labor division, food, beer and competition of over 2,000 expert laborers along with their families over 25 years has been worked out from the smallest teams of 40 to larger groups.
The inner rough stone with morter and rubble and the outer carved stone with passages are completly different in the way they were lifted. The next problem of lifting the stone was done with 2 ratcheted sloping galleries that lifted inner stone and the outer spiral ramp, stone was lifted up to 425 feet for the outer structure. Stone came by boats 200 feet away either on their deck or for larger stone slung underneath.
95% of the remains of a hydraulic ram pump for water is also a feature of the great pyramid that is not totally understood as to how and why it was used. One theory is it supplied water for an underground canal ceremony or irrigation. The whole structure is more of a public utility than a tomb.

All but one grand gallery with ratcheted lifting capacity has been directly explored. At this point density data only suggests where it is. Could there be more left undiscovered? Sure but I am satisfied how it was done.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 07:11 AM

wow!

oops I hadn't seen it (blush)


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