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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Sandra in Sydney 24 Oct 21 - 05:54 AM
Donuel 23 Oct 21 - 07:31 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Oct 21 - 07:20 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Oct 21 - 02:31 AM
Sandra in Sydney 20 Oct 21 - 07:05 PM
Donuel 19 Oct 21 - 04:45 PM
Donuel 19 Oct 21 - 04:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Oct 21 - 10:26 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 21 - 07:00 AM
Steve Shaw 19 Oct 21 - 06:45 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 21 - 05:02 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Oct 21 - 10:07 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 21 - 08:08 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Oct 21 - 11:26 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Oct 21 - 08:18 AM
Donuel 12 Oct 21 - 11:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Oct 21 - 11:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM
Donuel 12 Oct 21 - 11:17 AM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Oct 21 - 10:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 11 Oct 21 - 12:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Sep 21 - 04:52 AM
Sandra in Sydney 26 Sep 21 - 06:36 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM
Sandra in Sydney 16 Sep 21 - 08:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Sep 21 - 11:56 PM
Sandra in Sydney 09 Sep 21 - 01:55 AM
Sandra in Sydney 08 Sep 21 - 10:46 PM
Donuel 08 Sep 21 - 06:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 02:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 08 Sep 21 - 12:59 PM
Rain Dog 22 Aug 21 - 06:18 AM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Aug 21 - 10:42 PM
Sandra in Sydney 02 Aug 21 - 05:06 AM
Rain Dog 02 Aug 21 - 02:27 AM
Sandra in Sydney 01 Aug 21 - 09:46 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jul 21 - 09:20 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jul 21 - 06:46 AM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Jul 21 - 11:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jul 21 - 10:36 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Jul 21 - 09:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Jul 21 - 11:39 AM
Sandra in Sydney 14 Jul 21 - 11:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Oct 21 - 05:54 AM

another treasure! A new National Geographic documentary series - National Geographic TV

Egyptians used advanced embalming methods 1,000 years earlier than thought ... It is among major discoveries to be revealed in National Geographic’s documentary series, Lost Treasures of Egypt, starting on 7 November. It is produced by Windfall Films, and the cameras follow international archaeologists during the excavation season in Egypt. The mummification discovery will feature in episode four – entitled Rise of the Mummies – on 28 November.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 07:31 AM

Sandra posts are a treasure trove of antiquities in themselves.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 07:20 AM

I have a feeling that we all had a connection problem yesterday!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 02:31 AM

Have Sumatran fishing crews found the fabled Island of Gold? It was a fabled kingdom known in ancient times as the Island of Gold, a civilisation with untold wealth that explorers tried in vain to find long after its unexplained disappearance from history around the 14th century. The site of Srivijaya may finally have been found – by local fishing crews carrying out night-time dives on the Musi River near Palembang on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.
Their extraordinary catches are treasures ranging from a lifesize eighth-century Buddhist statue studded with precious gems – worth millions of pounds – to jewels worthy of kings ...

Treasures now retrieved by the fishers are simply being sold before archaeologists can properly study them, ending up with antiquities dealers, while the fishers using dangerous diving equipment and buckets receive a pittance of the true value.
“They are lost to the world,” Kingsley warned. “Vast swathes, including a stunning lifesize Buddhist statue adorned with precious gems, have been lost to the international antiquities market. Newly discovered, the story of the rise and fall of Srivijaya is dying anew without being told.”


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Oct 21 - 07:05 PM

Solar storm confirms Vikings settled in North America exactly 1,000 years ago

I tried to post these 3 references yesterday but had a connection problem
Unfreezing the ice age: the truth about humanity’s deep past
For more than a century, this sacred treasure was hidden in a New Zealand swamp from the podcast series Stuff the British stole


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 04:45 PM

Someday there may be a Google LIDAR Earth for Armchair Archaeologists.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 04:41 PM

My tow truck driver used google earth to find my car today.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 10:26 AM

My daughter returned from Italy about 10 days before the new immunization mandates went into effect - I imagine those who haven't gone to work now because of no vaccination have slowed things throughout the workforce. Good timing for the tourist to have finished the trip before now.

Right now I'm working a puzzle to do with Times Square in NYC. Jigsaw puzzle travel, a subset of armchair travel. :)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 07:00 AM

I hope you get back to travelling to interesting places sometime soon.

I do my archaeological travel via magazines & websites, I have too many sore bits to do "real" travelling (poor me!) I give my old magazines to a charity shop where they are first read by a volunteer who used to volunteer on excavations in his earlier years.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 06:45 AM

I've been to Herculaneum twice. It's a lot more compact than Pompei and you can see the best of it in just a few hours. It's stunning. Unlike at Pompei, a lot of the buildings' roofs didn't collapse in the eruption, so many of the interiors are really well-preserved. The most poignant sight is the skeletons stranded in open-fronted buildings that were once on the sea shore (sea levels have changed significantly, so what was the shoreline is now well back on dry land). There's still plenty of excavating to do there.

See Pompei and Herculaneum before you die if you can. The best way to arrive at both is on the ultra-cheap Circumvesuviana railway that runs from Sorrento to Naples. When you get off at Ercolano Scavi station you do have to walk up the hill through the rather rough little town but it looks scarier than it is (you are in the vicinity of Naples, don't forget!). Pompei is easier. Vesuvius looms menacingly over both towns, though it lost a lot of its height in the eruption.

Give me a week to go wherever I like on the planet and there's nowhere I'd rather be...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 05:02 AM

more about the crusader sword


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Oct 21 - 10:07 PM

Sharp-eyed diver finds crusader’s ancient sword on Israeli seabed Metre-long relic, encrusted with marine organisms, is believed to be about 900 years old


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 08:08 PM

oops, I opened this thread to post this -
Skeleton buried in Vesuvius eruption found at Herculaneum Archaeologists find remains of fugitive during first dig at site near Pompeii in almost three decades


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM

a jigsaw room! with a view!

My 4 windows are full of plants, the north facing bedroom window has a sheer curtain & thin bright yellow curtains so looks lovely when the sun hits for a few hours in the morning. My other 3 windows just look across the courtyard to the neighbours, but the plants & blue wren decals give me a pretty view from my living room thru the sheet curtain, which is bordered with heavier curtains of green & brown ferns.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 11:26 AM

I have a box ready to ship to Mudcatters Jen and Art in New Mexico, it's one in a series they have collected. Good! I donated two others back to the shop. I have a space that I created during the 2020 COVID-19 shutdown when I rearranged two rooms in the house. Now the one that people first walk into is light and airy, my triple window full of plants looks lush and inviting, and my table is set up for puzzles, even rather large puzzles. (Fully extended I think this table can seat 12).

It does seem to offer a form of armchair travel (though I usually stand, not sit, for a few minutes at a time to work on this, then go back to whatever took me past the room to begin with.) The one I've shipped represents Paris during the time of an Exposition. Now I'm working on one from NY City, and the one I set aside for a time I am told by a couple of friends is the famous Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior in Minnesota. (Identified by actual traveller Joe Offer.)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Oct 21 - 08:18 AM

Stilly, I had a large (3 or 4 shelves) collection of old jigsaws, puzzles I'd bought in the 70s + used jigsaws I'd bought in recent years, all gone except for 2 (1942 Gen Macarthur Battle of Midway & 1952 Qoronation) I bought & 2 that belonged to my grandmother, cos I only have one table & online jigsaws are sooo much easier.

Tell yourself you have a house & have no need for on-line jigsaws, besides buying from the thrift shop is for a good cause. Mine all want to charity shops, amany came from charity shops.

sandra (supporting the circular economy)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:13 PM

healthy addictions in a word are 'fun'.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:04 PM

I'm headed to the local thrift store that carries used jigsaw puzzles. I'm finding them a fascinating way to take a close look at various interesting sites and objects. Woe to me if I get hooked on online puzzles.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM

I enjoy reading it, it's a gi-normous rabbit hole ...

If I believed in New Years' Day resolutions (as we all know every day is new year's day) I'd make one to delete bookmarks for my rabbit hole sites - I have soooo much I need to do!

delete bookmarks??? shudder, my tummy feels sick at the thought ...

sandra (off to Jigsaw Explorer which is not a time waster as it only gives me 2 new jigsaws each day, well, it does have archives aka More Puzzles)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:17 AM

Thank you Sandra, Origins.com in its entirety has become one of my virtual time machine guilty pleasures.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 10:05 AM

Medieval Remains of ‘Noble Girl’ Discovered Under Real Alcázar in Spain Archaeologists have unearthed the skeleton of a 5-year-old, blonde-haired girl, buried in the late 13th or early 14th century beneath a chapel floor in the Real Alcázar in the Virgen de la Antigua in Seville, Spain. On analysis of this Alcázar burial , they believe her coffin was moved to an even more sacred spot beside the main altar in the 1930s. This discovery hints at the possible existence of a hidden crypt full of treasure-laden royal burials. (read on)

Closer to home - a very famous mystery The Tamam Shud Enigma: Australian Cold Case with Ancient Persian Connection Re-opens. On December 1, 1948, authorities were called to Somerton beach in Adelaide, South Australia. A dead body had been found. Little did police realize they were about to encounter what is now considered one of Australia’s most profound mysteries, with connections to the ancient world.
They found his cold body on the sand, slumped at the base of a seawall. He was a middle-aged man in top physical condition, smartly dressed in a suit and tie, his sophisticated black shoes polished. Despite the hot weather, he wore a knit pullover and suit-jacket. His corpse revealed no obvious cause of death. Nobody knew who he was, or where he had come from. After collecting the body, police examined his possessions and clothes for a hint of who he was, but the tags and labels had been carefully removed, leaving no trail. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Oct 21 - 12:04 PM

Marble of ancient Greek statue traced to its likely origin

One of the great statues of antiquity has been connected to its likely birthplace by analysis of its marble.

The Colossus of the Naxians on the Greek island of Delos once stood about 9 metres tall, but is now in pieces. One is at the British Museum in London, while the rest are in Greece. The statue’s name refers to the island of Naxos, which has been a major source of marble since the Greek archaic era from 800 BC to 480 BC – but it isn’t from either of two known quarries of that period.

Instead, the marble has the chemical signature of a deposit in another part of the island, found by Scott Pike at Willamette University in Oregon. He will present his results at a meeting of the Geological Society of America on 11 October.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Sep 21 - 04:52 AM

Gibraltar cave chamber discovery could shed light on Neanderthals’ culture Researchers find space in Gorham’s Cave complex that has been closed off for at least 40,000 years.
Researchers excavating a cave network on the Rock of Gibraltar have discovered a new chamber, sealed off from the world for at least 40,000 years, that could shed light on the culture and customs of the Neanderthals who occupied the area for a thousand centuries. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Sep 21 - 06:36 AM

Ancient footprints could be oldest traces of humans in the Americas White Sands National Park, in southern New Mexico, is known for chalk-coloured dunes that stretch for hundreds of square kilometres. But at the height of the last Ice Age, the region was wetter and grassier. Mammoths, giant sloths and other animals walked the muddy shores of shallow lakes that grew and shrank with the seasons. And they had company.

In a landmark study published on 23 September in Science1, researchers suggest that human footprints from an ancient lakeshore in the park date to between 21,000 and 23,000 years old. If the dating is accurate — which specialists say is likely — the prints represent the earliest unequivocal evidence of human occupation anywhere in the Americas. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM

Here's a worm you won't want to meet in your travels. (One reason why armchair travel is a safer option.)

"The man was plagued by an unknown species related to the Guinea worm, one that may have recently jumped from reptiles to humans."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM

I found a link to this wonderful story (sorry, it's music in the BS section) down at the bottom of the page with Sandra's story: ‘We’re like Mork and Mindy!’ Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, music’s odd couple. :) This makes me happy!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM

and now for something a little bit different - Dinosaur fossil with ‘totally weird’ spikes in skeleton stuns experts


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM

lots of good info around, including in my stash of archaeology magazines. Since lockdowns started last year I've been grabbing magazines when I see them as supplies of any overseas magazines are erratic, when is why I had a stash of 6 unopened magazines! I only have 4 now. Some folk might spend their money on alcohol or shoes, I spend mine on magazines!

When lockdown ends & "unessential" businesses re-open I'll take all my read magazines (at least a dozen) to a charity shop where a retired volunteer used to go on digs (BC, of course, everything is BC in the world now) & eagerly devours them before putting them out for sale.

I also have friend who used to go on digs & is sorely missing them. She was due to go back to Greece last year ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM

Good articles, Sandra!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 16 Sep 21 - 08:50 PM

Scientists find evidence of humans making clothes 120,000 years ago

Study by Yale University Experts Proves Vinland Map is a Hoax

The Posthumous Disgrace of the Dark Master of Archaeological Hoaxes


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Sep 21 - 11:56 PM

Trying again (too many windows open before):

Piles of animal dung reveal the location of an ancient Arabian oasis is a for-profit site that aggregates science articles. So I went looking and found this, with more information, but still not the whole story.

Abstract
Aim
Dryland ecosystems, such as those in southern Arabia, are particularly vulnerable to climate and land-use change. Aridification and human subsistence changes at the end of the Holocene Humid Period at 6–4 ka have been used as an iconic example for evaluating such impacts to resilience of arid systems. Although records of ancient environments can provide critical insight into the biotic and abiotic mechanisms that alter ecosystems, traditional archives, such as lake deposits, are not common in southern Arabia after 6 ka; thus, we must use alternative archives.

Location
Yemen.

Taxon
Plants; Rock Hyrax (Procavia capensis).

Methods
We use fossil pollen and stable isotopes (d15N; d13C) of rock hyrax (P. capensis) middens from Wadi Sana, Yemen, to look at changes in ecosystem structure and function across this key transition from 6 ka to the present. A total of 17 middens were radiocarbon-dated and stable isotopes were measured. Of these, pollen was extracted from hyraceum of 14 middens and identified using a light microscope. Fossil pollen assemblages were then compared to existing modern pollen samples from throughout Arabia.

Results
During the mid-Holocene from at least 6 to 4.7 ka, the pollen flora reflects a landscape with abundant tropical trees. These included foundational woody taxa, such as Terminalia and Boswellia sacra (frankincense), which had a strong positive influence on local hydrology and the economy, respectively. Increased charcoal abundances also suggest that wildfire occurred periodically.

Main conclusions
Connections with archaeological evidence suggest a strong link between human management and the presence of Terminalia woodland during the mid-Holocene. These may have promoted increased groundwater storage and ponding as regional rainfall was decreasing. The mid-Holocene expansion of Boswellia sacra (frankincense) may have helped support resin trade that became a critical export from the region. Fires were more common than today, suggesting semi-arid but continuous vegetation cover across what is now bare ground. Finally, after 1 ka, increased sedge abundances at the expense of grasses and trees suggest the development of desert conditions.


It turns out this may be a very old story, because another link I found is this: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281474114_Early_Arabian_Pastoralism_at_Manayzah_in_Wadi_Sana_Hadramawt

I've accidentally deleted this page once, so I'll submit this message and sort it out later. What I find interesting is the archaeological information found in the middens of small desert animals. The same is true of packrat middens in the US desert southwest.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 09 Sep 21 - 01:55 AM

oops, a little typo?

many thankyous


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 10:46 PM

links I sent to a friend recently. For a few years she has spent holidays participating in excavations overseas & had been looking forward to a trip to Greece last year, & no doubt would have found one this year too!

https://dustyoldthing.com/first-pregnant-egyptian-mummy/

https://dustyoldthing.com/5th-century-bohemian-graves/

https://dustyoldthing.com/spanish-stonehenge-uncovered/

https://dustyoldthing.com/processional-chariot-pompeii/

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/aug/05/australian-mathematician-discovers-applied-geometry-engraved-on-3700-year-old-tablet

UC discovers princely tombs near 'Griffin Warrior' Startling find adds to amazing story of powerful Greek figure

New evidence of a Roman road in the Venice Lagoon

Human remains in tomb are best-preserved ever found in Pompeii



Fixed the Guardian/mathematician link. ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 06:25 PM

Australian 'cave ' paintings here compared to elsewhere further down


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 02:18 PM

Lots of these stories are turning up today.

Trove of 239 Rare Gold Coins Discovered in Walls of French Mansion
Renovators discovered a hidden box and pouch stuffed with rare gold coins, minted during the reigns of French Kings Louis XIII and Louis XIV

Beginning in 2016, all treasures discovered in France automatically became property of the state. However, since the mansion owners purchased the property in 2012, they have the rights to sell their finds, reports France 3. Per French law, the proceeds from the sale will be split in half, with half going to the married couple who owns the property and half to be split evenly among the three discoverers.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM

Mysterious Stone Balls Found in Deteriorating Scottish Tomb
Dating back some 5,500 years, the polished stone balls could’ve been used as weapons.

Archaeologists working in the Orkney Islands of Scotland have uncovered two polished stone balls dating back to the Neolithic.

The stone balls were found inside the Tresness stalled cairn, an early Neolithic tomb located on Sanday, one of dozens of islands in Scotland’s Orkney archipelago. It’s a significant discovery, as only a small handful of these prehistoric balls have ever been found in a burial context.

“A cracking find from the tomb!,” tweeted team co-leader Hugo Anderson-Whymark, an archaeologist with National Museums Scotland (NMS), on August 18 after his team found the first of the two balls. “Only 20 or so Neolithic polished stone balls have been found in Orkney and few have been recovered from secure contexts,” he added.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Sep 21 - 12:59 PM

The nomad guide who decodes the Sahara's secrets

By the 16th Century, more people – 100,000 – lived in Timbuktu than lived in London


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 22 Aug 21 - 06:18 AM

Thanks for the links Sandra.

You have to love archaeologists. From the article itself:

"may be the preserved remains of cheese making"

"the possible remains of a failed attempt of cheese making"

"preliminary guess is that it could be the failed result of cheese making"

And the headline to the article is:

"Burnt cheese casts light on 3,000 year-old family drama"

I watched the last two episodes of

Archaeology: A Secret History. Presented by Dr. Richard Miles.

It was originally broadcast in 2013 but i missed it then.

Archaeology: A Secret History


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Aug 21 - 10:42 PM

prehistoric cheese!


& from the same site - Egtved girl, & lots more


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Aug 21 - 05:06 AM

the exhibition might bring them out, especially as the Museum values them & their finders.

Back in the 70s when I was wandering along a beach, I found a worn piece of glass & a not-so-worn ceramic piece so I thought I might have a look at them. They live on a plastic plate at the end of my bath along with other finds picked up over the decades, including several other bits of glass & ceramics & a little bit of pumice(?) I don't remember where or when I found them, apart from a piece of coral which was in a street planter near a shop that sold mixed bags of pretty shells! Some kid must have tossed it away as it wasn't pretty.

getting back to our topic - another Guardian story Fruit baskets from fourth century BC found in ruins of Thonis-Heracleion


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 02 Aug 21 - 02:27 AM

Saw that link and video yesterday and found it very interesting. I also liked the prominence given to the 'amateurs' who report their finds. Makes you wonder what other artefacts are tucked away in various cupboards and drawers.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 01 Aug 21 - 09:46 PM

Doggerland: Lost ‘Atlantis’ of the North Sea gives up its ancient secrets A virtual tour of the exhibition Doggerland: Lost World in the North Sea, which will be physically available to visit until 31 October, can be viewed on the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden’s YouTube channel

The guided tour is amazing - especially the graphic at the end showing the effect for the Netherlands of the projected 9 metre rise in sea level in 700-800 years!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jul 21 - 09:20 PM

oops, I don't always test links, but I tested this one!

Ancient Roman ship laden with wine jars discovered off Sicily


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jul 21 - 06:46 AM

2,300-year-old solar observatory awarded Unesco world heritage status


Link fixed. ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Jul 21 - 11:08 PM

Who Were These Vikings Buried Sitting Upright?
What Comforting Items Did Vikings Have That Are Still the Height of Luxury Today
Norse Warrior Took Comfy Duvet (and a Beheaded Owl) to the Afterlife

Thanks for posting it, Stilly, I was so busy reading these articles & many other related articles yesterday that altho I saw an article about Tolland man, I didn't read it. I spent a lot of time down that rabbit hole.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jul 21 - 10:36 PM

In the frugal last meal of a man 2,400 years ago, scientists see signs of human sacrifice
A study of the gut of a well-preserved body from a bog in Denmark has offered new details that researchers say hint at dark rituals.

I haven't read it all, but I wanted to pass it along before I lose track of the page.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Jul 21 - 09:14 PM

stilly, I did wonder when I started reading the article if the conclusion (the King slept here!) was pseudoscience, but the final par showed it was a real excavation/archaeological project.

Another article with a link to the survey Anchor Church Caves: Anglo-Saxon Home and Oldest House in Britain? ... Archaeologists from Wessex Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Institute of the Royal Agricultural University (RAU) recently joined forces to survey of the Anchor Church Caves in the English county of Derbyshire, listed as a grade II building. The results of this new study have been published in the Proceedings of the UBSS (University of Bristol Spelaeological Society)

When I started reading this I also wondered if was wish-fulfillment - The Quest to Understand Haliphat’s Speaking Handshapes but Plato in the 5th century BC mentioned sign language used by "dumb" people.

Now when did I start this post? It's definitely time to get back to stuff I need to do, no more browsing on interesting (time wasting???) sites!

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Jul 21 - 11:39 AM

Sandra, I pulled up that location on Google Earth. If you follow the link to the story about the church where Hardulph is buried, you see:      
This has to be one of the most important churches in the two counties if not in the whole of the UK because of its unique Saxon carvings – but more on that later. This church is dramatically sited on a limestone hill being cut-away by the quarry below and can be seen for many miles.

The second sentence is vague with its subjects - which is visible for miles - the church or the hill or the quarry? Google Earth confirms that there is a large and currently active quarry with various levels in view. It's almost wrapped on three sides by that excavation.

Your article says the project is looking at 170 sites - in England? The UK? That's a lot of caves. I've read about caves in China and Tibet (some of them very difficult to reach), in Italy and other parts of Europe. In the Middle East (full of Dead Sea scrolls). Interesting that I never really thought about caves getting much use in the UK (though I've always known about Fingal's Cave, of musical fame).


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 14 Jul 21 - 11:07 PM

Derbyshire cave house identified as ninth-century home to exiled king


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM

This was a link from that article about "Faces of the dead" - A Maryland attic hid a priceless trove of Black history. Historians and activists saved it from auction.
Among the artifacts is an account of escape from enslavement that is among the oldest ever found


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